Maduro vs. Guaido

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Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by DrRawBlueGreen » Fri Feb 22, 2019 12:05 am

Who should be in charge? Would be interesting to hear Latin American or even better Venezuelan opinions.

I suggest,respect other people’s opinion if you want to be respected.
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by kaputt » Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:20 am

I support Maduro as the legitimate PM of Venezuela. You may like him or not, he is the elected President and Guaido is NOT ! What scares me is the speed in which the US (in my opinion the main reason why Venezuela is in the current miserable state) and the EU aswell as Brazil accept Guaido as the new "legit" President. Why not support Bernie Sanders instead of Donald the Trump ? The meddeling in Venezuela's internal affairs remind me of how much the US in particular tried every trick in the book to trigger a Regime Change in Cambodia. If it wasn't for the Chinese to step in we would probably have a US Naval Base in Ream already. The good thing about "the Trump" is that he actually pulls US troops out of many countries. Germany does not have this luxury yet. 33000 US Troops are still occupying the Country while all Russian, British, French and even Canadian Troops have long returned to their Home Countries.
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by DrRawBlueGreen » Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:47 am

I agree. You forgot Colombia, which is a real threat too,as this would be the country from which the “allies” want to enter if a military occupation would be necessary, in their view. It becomes obvious if we look at the recent past, when they tried to disempower Chavez but he was defended by the people. The economy may be weak atm in Venezuela, I actually don’t know as I wasn’t there, but if so this is through the sanctions. A country with such huge quantity in natural resources would never struggle the way the medias are presenting it. Even if they were corrupt.
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by Anthony's Weiner » Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:16 am

DrRawBlueGreen wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:47 am
I agree. You forgot Colombia, which is a real threat too,as this would be the country from which the “allies” want to enter if a military occupation would be necessary, in their view. It becomes obvious if we look at the recent past, when they tried to disempower Chavez but he was defended by the people. The economy may be weak atm in Venezuela, I actually don’t know as I wasn’t there, but if so this is through the sanctions. A country with such huge quantity in natural resources would never struggle the way the medias are presenting it. Even if they were corrupt.
The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_curse

Oil-rich Angola is a case in point. Despite having one of the world's highest growth rates from 2005 to 2010, averaging some 17 percent annually, its score on the human development index remained a miserable 0.49, and its infant mortality rate was lower than the sub-Saharan African average.
Finally, the very presence of oil and gas resources within developing countries exacerbates the risk of violent conflict. The list of civil conflicts fought at least in part for control of oil and gas resources is long. A partial list would include Nigeria, Angola, Burma, Papua New Guinea (Bougainville), Chad, Pakistan (Balochistan), and of course Sudan
https://www.theatlantic.com/internation ... it/256508/


https://resourcegovernance.org/sites/de ... -Curse.pdf


IMF projects Venezuela inflation will hit 1,000,000 percent in 2018
. (Reuters) - Venezuela's inflation rate is likely to top 1,000,000 percent in 2018, an International Monetary Fund official wrote on Monday, putting it on track to become one of the worst hyperinflationary crises in modern history. Jul 23, 2018.

Respectfully I disagree with your statements. I would think that it is difficult for the media to put a negative spin on 1.000.000% inflation.
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by frank lee bent » Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:19 am

Border with Brasil now closed by Maduro
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by pczz » Fri Feb 22, 2019 9:39 am

And the winner will be .......
Russia and china. i dont think Trump has the balls for a re-run of the Cuba crisis but it will be intersting to see what comes in the russian aid convoy :-)
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by DrRawBlueGreen » Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:41 pm

Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:16 am
DrRawBlueGreen wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:47 am
I agree. You forgot Colombia, which is a real threat too,as this would be the country from which the “allies” want to enter if a military occupation would be necessary, in their view. It becomes obvious if we look at the recent past, when they tried to disempower Chavez but he was defended by the people. The economy may be weak atm in Venezuela, I actually don’t know as I wasn’t there, but if so this is through the sanctions. A country with such huge quantity in natural resources would never struggle the way the medias are presenting it. Even if they were corrupt.
The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_curse

Oil-rich Angola is a case in point. Despite having one of the world's highest growth rates from 2005 to 2010, averaging some 17 percent annually, its score on the human development index remained a miserable 0.49, and its infant mortality rate was lower than the sub-Saharan African average.
Finally, the very presence of oil and gas resources within developing countries exacerbates the risk of violent conflict. The list of civil conflicts fought at least in part for control of oil and gas resources is long. A partial list would include Nigeria, Angola, Burma, Papua New Guinea (Bougainville), Chad, Pakistan (Balochistan), and of course Sudan
https://www.theatlantic.com/internation ... it/256508/


https://resourcegovernance.org/sites/de ... -Curse.pdf


IMF projects Venezuela inflation will hit 1,000,000 percent in 2018
. (Reuters) - Venezuela's inflation rate is likely to top 1,000,000 percent in 2018, an International Monetary Fund official wrote on Monday, putting it on track to become one of the worst hyperinflationary crises in modern history. Jul 23, 2018.

Respectfully I disagree with your statements. I would think that it is difficult for the media to put a negative spin on 1.000.000% inflation.
Being a Kurd living in Iraq, I know too well what the curse of oil means.
You haven’t mentioned countries with the biggest oil reserves after Venezuela. Which are Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq, my lovely neighbors. The curse of oil is Caused by foreign forces who all want a share of the oil and if the government doesn’t follow the big powers then they get sanctioned or military and invaded. God knows I hate Saddam Hussein,he was brutal, corrupt and called officially for the genocide of the Kurds (Anfal, still not recognized by the international community, but that’s another topic) but his country didn’t struggle economically until the sanctions where put on him. Libya with another Diktator, is/ was not as rich as Iraq or Iran still his people were living comfortably until he decided not to not give a fuck about western politics but wanted to lift up the African economy in general. Iran, hell of a regime, still the people weren’t living poorly until the sanctions. Saudi, probably the son of the devil himself, the people are living in wealth—> no sanctions.

I read the IMF webpage and it says even 10.000.000,00 % inflation in oct 2018. What a number. It’s just not plausible
“If the world was a girl, I’d stick my d..k in the ground. F..k the World.”

“Borders do not make us safe rather they keep us as slaves”
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by DrRawBlueGreen » Fri Feb 22, 2019 5:20 pm

pczz wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 9:39 am
And the winner will be .......
Russia and china. i dont think Trump has the balls for a re-run of the Cuba crisis but it will be intersting to see what comes in the russian aid convoy :-)
Hope so, for the world balance sake.

IMO almost all governments are the same, just some are more powerful. I don’t know if it’s the power that makes the people evil or is it that evil people are more motivated to get into power?
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by Anthony's Weiner » Fri Feb 22, 2019 8:30 pm

DrRawBlueGreen wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:41 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:16 am
DrRawBlueGreen wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:47 am
I agree. You forgot Colombia, which is a real threat too,as this would be the country from which the “allies” want to enter if a military occupation would be necessary, in their view. It becomes obvious if we look at the recent past, when they tried to disempower Chavez but he was defended by the people. The economy may be weak atm in Venezuela, I actually don’t know as I wasn’t there, but if so this is through the sanctions. A country with such huge quantity in natural resources would never struggle the way the medias are presenting it. Even if they were corrupt.
The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_curse

Oil-rich Angola is a case in point. Despite having one of the world's highest growth rates from 2005 to 2010, averaging some 17 percent annually, its score on the human development index remained a miserable 0.49, and its infant mortality rate was lower than the sub-Saharan African average.
Finally, the very presence of oil and gas resources within developing countries exacerbates the risk of violent conflict. The list of civil conflicts fought at least in part for control of oil and gas resources is long. A partial list would include Nigeria, Angola, Burma, Papua New Guinea (Bougainville), Chad, Pakistan (Balochistan), and of course Sudan
https://www.theatlantic.com/internation ... it/256508/


https://resourcegovernance.org/sites/de ... -Curse.pdf


IMF projects Venezuela inflation will hit 1,000,000 percent in 2018
. (Reuters) - Venezuela's inflation rate is likely to top 1,000,000 percent in 2018, an International Monetary Fund official wrote on Monday, putting it on track to become one of the worst hyperinflationary crises in modern history. Jul 23, 2018.

Respectfully I disagree with your statements. I would think that it is difficult for the media to put a negative spin on 1.000.000% inflation.



Being a Kurd living in Iraq, I know too well what the curse of oil means.
You haven’t mentioned countries with the biggest oil reserves after Venezuela. Which are Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq, my lovely neighbors. The curse of oil is Caused by foreign forces who all want a share of the oil and if the government doesn’t follow the big powers then they get sanctioned or military and invaded. God knows I hate Saddam Hussein,he was brutal, corrupt and called officially for the genocide of the Kurds (Anfal, still not recognized by the international community, but that’s another topic) but his country didn’t struggle economically until the sanctions where put on him. Libya with another Diktator, is/ was not as rich as Iraq or Iran still his people were living comfortably until he decided not to not give a fuck about western politics but wanted to lift up the African economy in general. Iran, hell of a regime, still the people weren’t living poorly until the sanctions. Saudi, probably the son of the devil himself, the people are living in wealth—> no sanctions.

I read the IMF webpage and it says even 10.000.000,00 % inflation in oct 2018. What a number. It’s just not plausible
/quote]
During the height of inflation from 2008 to 2009, it was difficult to measure Zimbabwe's hyperinflation because the government of Zimbabwe stopped filing official inflation statistics. However, Zimbabwe's peak month of inflation is estimated at 79.6 billion percent in mid-November 2008. I don 't speak three languages but I don't have a closed mind.
I guess being trilingual just allows you to ignore facts in three languages.
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Re: Maduro vs. Guaido

Post by DrRawBlueGreen » Fri Feb 22, 2019 9:42 pm

Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 8:30 pm
DrRawBlueGreen wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:41 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:16 am
DrRawBlueGreen wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:47 am
I agree. You forgot Colombia, which is a real threat too,as this would be the country from which the “allies” want to enter if a military occupation would be necessary, in their view. It becomes obvious if we look at the recent past, when they tried to disempower Chavez but he was defended by the people. The economy may be weak atm in Venezuela, I actually don’t know as I wasn’t there, but if so this is through the sanctions. A country with such huge quantity in natural resources would never struggle the way the medias are presenting it. Even if they were corrupt.
The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_curse

Oil-rich Angola is a case in point. Despite having one of the world's highest growth rates from 2005 to 2010, averaging some 17 percent annually, its score on the human development index remained a miserable 0.49, and its infant mortality rate was lower than the sub-Saharan African average.
Finally, the very presence of oil and gas resources within developing countries exacerbates the risk of violent conflict. The list of civil conflicts fought at least in part for control of oil and gas resources is long. A partial list would include Nigeria, Angola, Burma, Papua New Guinea (Bougainville), Chad, Pakistan (Balochistan), and of course Sudan
https://www.theatlantic.com/internation ... it/256508/


https://resourcegovernance.org/sites/de ... -Curse.pdf


IMF projects Venezuela inflation will hit 1,000,000 percent in 2018
. (Reuters) - Venezuela's inflation rate is likely to top 1,000,000 percent in 2018, an International Monetary Fund official wrote on Monday, putting it on track to become one of the worst hyperinflationary crises in modern history. Jul 23, 2018.

Respectfully I disagree with your statements. I would think that it is difficult for the media to put a negative spin on 1.000.000% inflation.



Being a Kurd living in Iraq, I know too well what the curse of oil means.
You haven’t mentioned countries with the biggest oil reserves after Venezuela. Which are Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq, my lovely neighbors. The curse of oil is Caused by foreign forces who all want a share of the oil and if the government doesn’t follow the big powers then they get sanctioned or military and invaded. God knows I hate Saddam Hussein,he was brutal, corrupt and called officially for the genocide of the Kurds (Anfal, still not recognized by the international community, but that’s another topic) but his country didn’t struggle economically until the sanctions where put on him. Libya with another Diktator, is/ was not as rich as Iraq or Iran still his people were living comfortably until he decided not to not give a fuck about western politics but wanted to lift up the African economy in general. Iran, hell of a regime, still the people weren’t living poorly until the sanctions. Saudi, probably the son of the devil himself, the people are living in wealth—> no sanctions.

I read the IMF webpage and it says even 10.000.000,00 % inflation in oct 2018. What a number. It’s just not plausible
/quote]
During the height of inflation from 2008 to 2009, it was difficult to measure Zimbabwe's hyperinflation because the government of Zimbabwe stopped filing official inflation statistics. However, Zimbabwe's peak month of inflation is estimated at 79.6 billion percent in mid-November 2008. I don 't speak three languages but I don't have a closed mind.
I guess being trilingual just allows you to ignore facts in three languages.
Facts :ROFL: your level of argumentation deserves only one answer: go back in your cage and wait for your master’s order
“If the world was a girl, I’d stick my d..k in the ground. F..k the World.”

“Borders do not make us safe rather they keep us as slaves”
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