I had a really cool great great uncle;

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phuketrichard
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I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by phuketrichard » Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:44 am

Looking at my past;

Ben Reitman and the hobo college of Chicago.
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
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Re: I had a really cool great uncle;

Post by Kung-fu Hillbilly » Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:51 am

Apparently, I had a seven foot tall great uncle who used to roller skate around Cardiff wearing a three piece suit while carrying an open umbrella, a stuffed parrot sat on his shoulder completing his outfit.
The idea that seeing the world is going from place to place to look at obvious things is an illusion natural to dull minds.
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by explorer » Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:38 pm

If you go back hundreds of years, some of us are actually related to the British royal family. Of course we have no connections with them in modern times.
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by Anthony's Weiner » Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:54 pm

explorer wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:38 pm
If you go back hundreds of years, some of us are actually related to the British royal family. Of course we have no connections with them in modern times.
Kungfu Hillbilly already told us he had an uncle that was a clown. He didn t have to go back hundreds of years. Actually we are all related. All homo sapiens alive today share a fraction of Mitochondrial Eve's DNA. You are likely somewhere between my 1/16th cousin and my 1/20th cousin. I will be expecting a Christmas Card from you now even though I am from the Jewish side of the family.
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by Freightdog » Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:19 pm

Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:54 pm
Actually we are all related. All homo sapiens alive today share a fraction of Mitochondrial Eve's DNA. You are likely somewhere between my 1/16th cousin and my 1/20th cousin. I will be expecting a Christmas Card from you now even though I am from the Jewish side of the family.
There you go- spoil my day. I don't like at least half the people that I know I am directly related too. :facepalm:
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by explorer » Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:23 pm

Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:54 pm
explorer wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:38 pm
If you go back hundreds of years, some of us are actually related to the British royal family. Of course we have no connections with them in modern times.
Kungfu Hillbilly already told us he had an uncle that was a clown. He didn t have to go back hundreds of years. Actually we are all related. All homo sapiens alive today share a fraction of Mitochondrial Eve's DNA. You are likely somewhere between my 1/16th cousin and my 1/20th cousin. I will be expecting a Christmas Card from you now even though I am from the Jewish side of the family.
Probably a large proportion of the world's population is genetically a descendant of Abraham. Isolated races such as the American Indians may not be. While my ancestors were British, probably people of Jewish descent went to Britain a long time ago.

I have spent time recently in a place in Cambodia where there are a lot of Cambodians with brown hair. There are even some with blond hair. It is interesting that this occurs in both the Buddhist and Cham populations. You may think of them as genetically different, but if only a few of them intermarried in each of the last 20 generations, they are actually genetically related.

Image

Beautiful hair. Don't you think?
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by Anthony's Weiner » Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:39 pm

explorer wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:23 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:54 pm
explorer wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 12:38 pm
If you go back hundreds of years, some of us are actually related to the British royal family. Of course we have no connections with them in modern times.
Kungfu Hillbilly already told us he had an uncle that was a clown. He didn t have to go back hundreds of years. Actually we are all related. All homo sapiens alive today share a fraction of Mitochondrial Eve's DNA. You are likely somewhere between my 1/16th cousin and my 1/20th cousin. I will be expecting a Christmas Card from you now even though I am from the Jewish side of the family.
Probably a large proportion of the world's population is genetically a descendant of Abraham. Isolated races such as the American Indians may not be. While my ancestors were British, probably people of Jewish descent went to Britain a long time ago.

I have spent time recently in a place in Cambodia where there are a lot of Cambodians with brown hair. There are even some with blond hair. It is interesting that this occurs in both the Buddhist and Cham populations. You may think of them as genetically different, but if only a few of them intermarried in each of the last 20 generations, they are actually genetically related.

Image
what where your ancestors before they were "British", the 1st "British" ones must have had a mother and father? Don t confuse science and religion, Abraham is a biblical figure. Google Mitochondrial Eve, you will get a better understanding. American Indians did not magically appear on earth one day , Homo Sapiens have evolved.
British Isles: Humans probably first arrived in Britain around 800,000 BC. These early inhabitants had to cope with extreme environmental changes and they left Britain at least seven times when conditions became too bad. if they first arrived in 800,000 BC they didn t fall out of the sky. Your ancestors come from somewhere along the nile my friend as do mine and my Thai wifes.
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by explorer » Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:50 pm

Anthony's Weiner wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:39 pm
what where your ancestors before they were "British", the 1st "British" ones must have had a mother and father? Don t confuse science and religion, Abraham is a biblical figure. Google Mitochondrial Eve, you will get a better understanding. American Indians did not magically appear on earth one day , Homo Sapiens have evolved.
British Isles: Humans probably first arrived in Britain around 800,000 BC. These early inhabitants had to cope with extreme environmental changes and they left Britain at least seven times when conditions became too bad. if they first arrived in 800,000 BC they didn t fall out of the sky. Your ancestors come from somewhere along the nile my friend as do mine and my Thai wifes.
Even in the last few thousand years, there have been so many people moving around and intermarrying, I think most of use are relatively closely related. And that has been happening ever since the beginning, but maybe they travelled less in ancient times.
## I thought I knew all the answers, but they changed all the questions. ##
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phuketrichard
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Re: I had a really cool great great uncle;

Post by phuketrichard » Wed Dec 18, 2019 2:49 pm

back on track
all in all now i know were some of my traits,characteristics come from

https://www-tc.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexp ... pscale.jpg

Ben Lewis Reitman, an anarchist doctor who served and consorted with hobos, prostitutes, the poor, and other outcasts in Chicago, died on this date in 1942. Reitman provided abortions, under risk of prosecution, and served six months in prison for advocating birth control — the longest sentence handed out under the Comstock Laws. He suffered tar and feathering and other forms of torture for his beliefs. In 1908,Reitman became Emma Goldman’s lover

(Born in Kovno, Russian Empire (now Kaunas, Lithuania) to a Jewish family, Goldman emigrated to the United States in 1885.[2] Attracted to anarchism after the Haymarket affair, Goldman became a writer and a renowned lecturer on anarchist philosophy, women's rights, and social issues, attracting crowds of thousands.[2] She and anarchist writer Alexander Berkman, her lover and lifelong friend, planned to assassinate industrialist and financier Henry Clay Frick as an act of propaganda of the deed. Frick survived the attempt on his life in 1892, and Berkman was sentenced to 22 years in prison. Goldman was imprisoned several times in the years that followed, for "inciting to riot" and illegally distributing information about birth control. In 1906, Goldman founded the anarchist journal Mother Earth. )

and “manager” (she called the relationship the “Great Grand Passion” of her life). In the 1930s, he established the Chicago Society for the Prevention of Venereal Disease.

“When Ben was handing out grub, he wasn’t arrogant. It was as if you were doing Doc a favor by sitting down beside him to eat.” — a fellow hobo
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
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Re: I had a really cool great uncle;

Post by AndyKK » Wed Dec 18, 2019 2:57 pm

Kung-fu Hillbilly wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:51 am
Apparently, I had a seven foot tall great uncle who used to roller skate around Cardiff wearing a three piece suit while carrying an open umbrella, a stuffed parrot sat on his shoulder completing his outfit.
He was not related to this guy was he. I also think he once passed me on a 3 pitch climb in the same area, he was solo but did stop to say good morning.

Roller skates and boxing gloves worn for 80th birthday climb
Date: Friday 7th April 2017

KESWICK climber Paul Ross has celebrated his 80th birthday by following in the footsteps — and hand holds — of the late great rock climber Ray McHaffie.
He ascended the last pitch of the classic route called Little Chamonix, on Shepherd’s Crag, Bor-rowdale, wearing boxing gloves and roller skates.
Paul decided to emulate Ray McHaffie’s celebrated climb as a tribute to the former Keswick climber and fell footpath builder, who died at the age of 69 in December, 2005, and to celebrate his 80th birthday in style.
He used full-blown boxing gloves for the climb, while it is thought that his predecessor slit the palms of his gloves to make the ascent marginally less problematic, and both used roller skates with fixed wheels.
Not surprisingly, Paul found the climb challenging, and, at times, managed to use the gloves as a wedge in cracks as he hauled himself to the top of the 230ft climb.
Paul said: “I did it for a bit of fun, to mark my birthday and because the sun was out. If anyone would now like to buy a pair of 14oz boxing gloves and roller skates I can assure them they have only been used once.”
At the top of the rope was Paul’s son, Andrew, from Salt Lake City, Utah, who travelled to the UK especially for the birthday celebrations.
Little Chamonix is a climb Paul first achieved at the age of 12. He has a black and white box Brownie image of himself wearing short trousers and grinning from ear to ear as he clings precariously to the exposed final part of the well-known route.
“I thought this was real fun because it was easier than climbing trees,” Paul said of his boyhood climb.
He went on to become one of the leading lights of rock climbing in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1953 he soloed climbs on Shepherd’s Crag and a year later led his first new route, Troutdale Pinnacle Super Direct (graded hard very severe) on Black Crag, also in Borrowdale.
He accomplished 138 first ascents, mostly in the Lake District, but including some in Morocco.
Paul Ross is a man of many professions. He ran the popular Lamplighter Cafe, in Lake Road, and has also been a mountain guide, climbing tackle store owner, games teacher in an American school in France, dog breeder — a Crufts best of breed winner — and, in America, was a politician and deputy sheriff, the latter for a day.
After leaving the UK to live and work in America he climbed El Capitan, in Yosemite, and achieved many new routes in the virgin climbing territory of the States, achieving more than 400 first ascents.
He also climbed in the Alps with legendary figures such as Chris Bonington and Don Whillans, and is the founder member of an organisation known as the “Coffin Dodgers Club”.
Although retired, he is extremely active for his age and enjoys walking, mountain biking, walking the dog and rock climbing.
“I was probably climbing as well as I ever did up to when I was 74,” he said. “I climb to a certain grade, but I never climb much above that. I was what you would call an off-the-couch climber. I exercised, obviously, walking and such like, but I never did weight training or went on climbing walls. I would bike, then hike, then climb.
“My exercise was doing stuff. Now the young climbers do specific exercises — pull-ups and all that nasty sort of stuff. I started out when rock climbing was extremely primitive, to say the least. You had a rope and a few slings and it has been great to climb right through the various stages of the sport’s development to the modern day.
“Achieving new climbs has always been my main interest. I only used to like doing first ascents and when I went to America I was in paradise because there was so much unclimbed rock.
“Father Time has caught up with my body, to some extent, but it hasn’t caught up with my mind. I get as much enjoyment now just being on rock.
“I found in my middle years that I used to get a bit more nervous about climbing. But as I got older it didn’t seem to bother me. Maybe I had it in the back of my head ‘what have I got to lose?’. If I get frightened it’s rare because I try and keep it under control.”

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