The Curry Club

Discussions about restaurants, cafes, coffee shops or bars in Cambodia. Feel free to write any reviews you have, whether its the best burger you've had in Phnom Penh or the worse pizza in sihanoukville, we want to read it! Discussions about Khmer dishes are also in here, or you can leave your own. If you own a restaurant, feel free to let the expat community know about it here so that we can come check it out. Found a favorite cafe or have a place we should avoid? Tell us about it. Asian recipes & questions are always welcome.
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AndyKK
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The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK »

The Curry Club

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Wow, I do love a good curry. I thought this may interest one or two members. A simple thread on the subject of “curry”.

Curries started to establish far away from their origins –

Vasco da Gama, was a Portuguese explorer and the first European to reach India by sea. His initial voyage to India (1497–1499) was the first to link Europe and Asia by an ocean route, connecting the Atlantic and the Indian oceans and therefore, the West and the Orient.

Portuguese explorers swiftly started trading curry spices in the 15th century, after they established the first marine trade routes from Europe to India. Fast forward to the 1700s when the British were incorporating “curry powder” into their cooking back home. Over the years, curry’s contrasting notes of sweet, spicy, sour, and heat have adapted to the ingredients and cultural preferences of various regions.

The famous hot Vindaloo curry I had actually had years ago in Goa, the dish was served with pork meat and owes its origins, to the Portuguese controlled Goa in the fifteenth century. The dish was the highlight of my visit, being that time of the rainy season.

We all may have once, or still like a curry on a Friday night after last orders called and swilling the last dregs of that pint of bitter, time for you and your mates to call at the local curry house. You could not buy a beer, but most welcomed you to take in your own tinny or two. Jugs of water and glasses were placed on the table with free Poppadum’s and dips, while the waiter took your order. Veg or Meat dishes.

Starters - Onion Bhaji, Samosa, Sheek and Shami Kebab, Tikka and Tandoori.

Mains - Madras, Korma, Rogan Josh, Masala.

Rice or breads to accompany. Yogurts and sweet or plain Lassi to help take away the heat spicy explosions in the mouth.
There are plenty more too, that’s what I like about Indian food, there are lots of dishes for choice and many combination of tastes, believe it or not, coriander helps make the dish for me.

But, “The Curry Club” can be that, of any type of curry and restaurants throughout Cambodia, or that of any country if you wish, or even that of home cooking.

Khmer - Fish Amok is that of a signature Khmer dish and can be found easily throughout the country.
Khmer curry noodles (Nom Banh Chok) is the most popular dish. Traditional Khmer curries don’t follow any strict recipe.

Did you have bones in yours? I don’t practically like to nibble on small bone with very little meat, at times it feels pointless. Jaan Bai Battambang has been my best experience of dinning.

Thai - Curry means paste. Pressed aromatic chilies, garlic, coriander root, ginger, lemongrass, kaffir lime rind, and shrimp paste add punch to dishes in a snap, meat or vegetable. I love the taste of mango, coconut and fresh basil. Red Curry, Green Curry, Yellow Curry and the mildest of all with its Persian influence, the Massaman.

I also find Thai curry can be the hottest of all needing a cool bottle of Chang near at hand.

Ceylon curry - Curry spices are roasted nearly burnt before they are ground, sweet tropical fruits and nuts, meat and seafood dishes, made with coconut milk and lime.

I had a few good varieties here with staying a little longer then expected, the airline resold my seat to one of their countrymen, when the civil war conflict between the Sri Lankan government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam once again, at the time became an issue.

Jamaican Curry - Scotch bonnet hot peppers, mixtures of cumin, anise, and whole mustard seeds, thin type curries with splashes of vinegar, Worcestershire, and hot sauce, a slightly sour dish overall.

I like these dishes, but like most curry, it can be hit or miss. Manchester was my first ever taste of such curry, and it was gooood, next while working, Tottenham London. We ended up in a place eating a dish based around a stew of cow’s hooves.

Indonesian and Malaysian – Dry beef curry is slow cooked and reduced until the coconut milk has nearly evaporated. The sweet, sour, spicy, savoury notes of curry come through chunks of meat coated with the thick, spicy paste.

This sounds good and really want to try.


Restaurant reviews (where to get a good curry) tell us about your experiences. And show us your curry dish. :hattip:
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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AndyKK
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK »

Last night I headed into the city to get a late evening meal. I fancied a curry from IDLI DOSA Indian Restaurant on Rue Pasteur No. 51 street. These days too I tend to get takeaway mostly spending most time in the apartment and not eating out that often due to the issue of Covid-19. It was a good call anyway being first of the year I have been soaked to the bone, being caught out in the heavy downpour on Preah Norodom Blvd (41). After sheltering under a shop canopy for a little while I was wondering if I would make it to the restaurant before they closed.

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I did just make it in time to place my order of Poppadum’s, Rice and 2 Roti, and a main dish of Mutton Keema.
While I was waiting on my order, I popped over the road to buy a rain mac being so cold. Soon I had my order and settled the bill of $8 and called at Super Duper on the way home.

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Pity the rice was not Basmati, also the keema was not that of mince, but more like pulled-pork style, never the less, the curry was good, mutton cooked with capsicum tomato and onion, not too spicy and full of flavour, the coconut chutney was a nice touch too. Over all it was very good. Next visit I will pay closer attention has curries start from $3.50

Curry can be very addictive so please take care.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/989256.stm
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by Freightdog »

Sadly, no photos or detail of the dish of my own; but from a trip to Sri Lanka a couple of years ago-

Black pork curry.

The hotel that I stayed at in Trincomalee frequently served this fantastic curry at breakfast. I like to get out and about and try all sorts of stuff when travelling, so it was a difficult choice not to fill up at breakfast.
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Doc67
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by Doc67 »

When I'm in PP my go-to place if Sher-al-Punjab on street 130. They do a very nice lamb curry there plus mutton Samosas, you get 4 of them for about $5. Excellent chicken tikka too, good generous portions so always a doggy bag to take home. Well worth the money.

Now I'm stuck in London and everything is shut, but I can get hold of cheap cuts of lamb and excellent lamb mince, so kebabs or keema curry can be made at home for very little money. Can't do the breads though, no tandoor.

Missing PP now...
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by hanno »

The only Indian restaurant here closed weeks ago; I sure miss my curry. Though I rarely get a curry as good as I used to have when I was a kid in Kenya. Limitless Chapatis, a huge selection of chutneys and condiments, and chip as chip. Never mind the Sikh owner sitting on the bar counter and cutting his toenails......
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by tightenupvolume1 »

This is the standard Goa "fish curry rice", cost 90 rupees thats under a £1
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by angsta »

Doc67 wrote: Mon Apr 27, 2020 2:49 pm When I'm in PP my go-to place if Sher-al-Punjab on street 130. They do a very nice lamb curry there plus mutton Samosas, you get 4 of them for about $5. Excellent chicken tikka too, good generous portions so always a doggy bag to take home. Well worth the money.


Missing PP now...
I can second this place. Does a very decent Chicken Jalfrazi. Always seems to be busy with deliveries, It has been around for a long time.
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Doc67
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by Doc67 »

tightenupvolume1 wrote: Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:19 pm This is the standard Goa "fish curry rice", cost 90 rupees thats under a £1
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Hmmm, Goa, that's a place I need to visit.
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by atst »

Enjoyed a curry on 172 next to Sinans but the Khmer girls with me wouldn't even eat the rice,
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AndyKK
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK »

Doc67 wrote: Mon Apr 27, 2020 6:17 pm
tightenupvolume1 wrote: Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:19 pm This is the standard Goa "fish curry rice", cost 90 rupees thats under a £1
Image
Hmmm, Goa, that's a place I need to visit.
I have visited Goa twice in 92 and 93 both times has an independent traveller with no plans, apart from climbing in the norths lower Himalaya. both time having lots of journey time, but, Goa I hit both times in the rainy season, but still the food was very good, pork and potato vindaloo being my favoured dish. But then again I had, and still remember the special dishes from many locations around India, they are the masters of gravy, that what we call curry.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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