Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

This is a part of our Cambodia forums to chat about anything Cambodia-related. This discussion forum is at the top of our site because it's usually the busiest part of the expat community chatter with random topics on just about everything, including expat life, Khmer politics, Cambodian blogs we have or have come across, or whatever else our members want to discuss. Whether you're an expatriate, tourist, Cambodian or random traveler just passing through South East Asia, you are welcome to talk about anything or start new topics yourselves.
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John Bingham
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by John Bingham »

Cruisemonkey wrote: Wed Jul 17, 2019 12:07 pm The article mentions morphine and heroin... but not what is probably the biggest killer drug of all - alcohol. I've seen A LOT of expats in SE Asia slowly killing themselves with cheap booze.
The article mentions alcohol and booze quite a few times. It's a dumb article anyway, it concentrates on the sort of people the author may have encountered in whatever flea-holes he visited. Bringing in Graham Cleghorn as well, that creep was about as innocent as Fred West.
Silence, exile, and cunning.
pczz
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

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tireswang wrote: Wed Jan 01, 2020 5:43 pm :beer1: Fat Sammy's restaurant seems to be alive and well in Koh Kong...and not to mention the Many successful foreign businesses in Siem Reap. I probably would be classified in your category as a dead/deathpat,...but I am not trying to kill myself...I JUST plan on dying over here somewhere, sooner or laters. Hopefully Laters. If I was an European with universal healthcare...I would go die there!
Who told you that there was universal healthcare in Europe? Only certain countries and within certain limits
Anthony's Weiner
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by Anthony's Weiner »

pczz wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 12:57 am
tireswang wrote: Wed Jan 01, 2020 5:43 pm :beer1: Fat Sammy's restaurant seems to be alive and well in Koh Kong...and not to mention the Many successful foreign businesses in Siem Reap. I probably would be classified in your category as a dead/deathpat,...but I am not trying to kill myself...I JUST plan on dying over here somewhere, sooner or laters. Hopefully Laters. If I was an European with universal healthcare...I would go die there!
Who told you that there was universal healthcare in Europe? Only certain countries and within certain limits
Almost all European countries have healthcare available for all citizens. Most European countries have systems of competing private health insurance companies, along with government regulation and subsidies for citizens who cannot afford health insurance premiums. Countries with universal healthcare include Austria, Belarus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and the United Kingdom.
pczz
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by pczz »

Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:13 am
pczz wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 12:57 am
tireswang wrote: Wed Jan 01, 2020 5:43 pm :beer1: Fat Sammy's restaurant seems to be alive and well in Koh Kong...and not to mention the Many successful foreign businesses in Siem Reap. I probably would be classified in your category as a dead/deathpat,...but I am not trying to kill myself...I JUST plan on dying over here somewhere, sooner or laters. Hopefully Laters. If I was an European with universal healthcare...I would go die there!
Who told you that there was universal healthcare in Europe? Only certain countries and within certain limits
Almost all European countries have healthcare available for all citizens. Most European countries have systems of competing private health insurance companies, along with government regulation and subsidies for citizens who cannot afford health insurance premiums. Countries with universal healthcare include Austria, Belarus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and the United Kingdom.
Almost right. Most of those systems require you to have paid into the NI system of the country for a specified time. Health service of a kind are available to most citizens but there are exclusions which is why I do not consider it to be universal. Everyone seems to believe you get ebveryhting but you do not. For example in UK you do not get dental or glasses. Some srugs are not permitted becasue they are too expensive, some service are not free in all circumstances like physio. You are charged for sports Injuries and prescription medicines are not free for most people. Many medicines are cheaper over the counter.State pensions are the same. if you havent paid enough in, you get bugger all out. In France you have to pay when you go to hospital. Used to be 20 euros a day. you can pay higher national Insurance to aboid this.In ireland my irish friend tells me it is now 100 euros to see a doctor, but emergency care is free. The point is that many people who do not live in Europe assume that it is all the same and that everythign is free. it is not
Anthony's Weiner
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by Anthony's Weiner »

pczz wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:41 am
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:13 am
pczz wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 12:57 am
tireswang wrote: Wed Jan 01, 2020 5:43 pm :beer1: Fat Sammy's restaurant seems to be alive and well in Koh Kong...and not to mention the Many successful foreign businesses in Siem Reap. I probably would be classified in your category as a dead/deathpat,...but I am not trying to kill myself...I JUST plan on dying over here somewhere, sooner or laters. Hopefully Laters. If I was an European with universal healthcare...I would go die there!
Who told you that there was universal healthcare in Europe? Only certain countries and within certain limits
Almost all European countries have healthcare available for all citizens. Most European countries have systems of competing private health insurance companies, along with government regulation and subsidies for citizens who cannot afford health insurance premiums. Countries with universal healthcare include Austria, Belarus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and the United Kingdom.
Almost right. Most of those systems require you to have paid into the NI system of the country for a specified time. Health service of a kind are available to most citizens but there are exclusions which is why I do not consider it to be universal. Everyone seems to believe you get ebveryhting but you do not. For example in UK you do not get dental or glasses. Some srugs are not permitted becasue they are too expensive, some service are not free in all circumstances like physio. You are charged for sports Injuries and prescription medicines are not free for most people. Many medicines are cheaper over the counter.State pensions are the same. if you havent paid enough in, you get bugger all out. In France you have to pay when you go to hospital. Used to be 20 euros a day. you can pay higher national Insurance to aboid this.In ireland my irish friend tells me it is now 100 euros to see a doctor, but emergency care is free. The point is that many people who do not live in Europe assume that it is all the same and that everythign is free. it is not
With all due respect, I believe your definition of universal healthcare is unique. You believe it must include no required pay in, free dental, free eye care, all drugs and physio free, free sports medicine and free hospital. You are correct though, no nation in Europe meets your definition of universal health care. I know of no country that offers what you require to meet your standards. Of the top ten publically funded health care systems in the world 7 are in Europe, Australia, Canada and New Zealand make the other three.
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clutchcargo
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by clutchcargo »

No more off topic discussion on universal health care in Europe please. Let's stick to Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats. Thanks
shnoukieBRO
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by shnoukieBRO »

I would say this article isn't specific to Cambodia but to all other 3rd world /low GDP Countries, that attract expats.

The bottom line is that Expats need to take care in lesser controlled environments.
BR549
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by BR549 »

How do you pronounce MANCUNIAN?
MAN COON IAN?
that would be a very dangerous word to utter in SE USA and most of the rest of the country.
I would not recommend it.
I think the cheap smokes, easy to get hard drugs, over the counter sleeping pills, cheap liquor, lack of decent roads, wild driving, open range roads where buffalo and cows cross anytime all add up to a recipe for danger.
I know people who could not afford 1 pack of smokes a day in their home countries.
In the US I would have to get a prescription for most of the meds I buy..I don't take sleeping pills..but, sure could see a guy taking too many.
Toss in the heartbreak of losing a fine bar girl you thought was true..especially, when you were running out of cash or made the mistake of marrying her and sinking your life's savings into something in her name.
The lady who was just killed with 3 kids on her moto in Siem Reap could of been an expat.
Remember those gals on motos when the LPG place blew up?
In Koh Samui there is a waterfall I went to that people love to climb up and fall off of.
People get too relaxed on vacation and go for a swim.
My Thai lady told me I needed to wear my helmet in Koh Samui during the day because of the police..bit, don't worry at night.
I told her..'everyone is fucking wasted at night'.
I wore my helmet.
Toss in crummy hospitals..traffic that doesn't heed to emergency vehicles and you have a plethora of ways to put yourself in danger.
That poor guy who lost his leg and is trying to get $40,000us.
He was just a few hundred meters from work.
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Yerg
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by Yerg »

BR549 wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 5:05 pm How do you pronounce MANCUNIAN?
MAN COON IAN?
that would be a very dangerous word to utter in SE USA and most of the rest of the country.
I would not recommend it.
It's more like "MAN-KEW-NIAN", and would be safe as houses! :hattip:
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Re: Dangerous Realities in Southeast Asia for Expats

Post by BR549 »

Thanks..
KEW..
I think mancuntian would be a good joke from a rival football city.
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