Please help identify the snake

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haiway85
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Please help identify the snake

Post by haiway85 » Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:47 pm

Hi there~! My friend stay in Prey Vor province & he send me this snake photo. He found the snake inside his room today & quickly ask someone to capture it. We both wanted to know whether the snake is venomous or harmless so that we will know what to do in future encounter. Thank you so much!!

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JUDGEDREDD
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Re: Please help identify the snake

Post by JUDGEDREDD » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:59 pm

The one behind is a trouser snake!

Perhaps it's this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homalopsis_buccata aka puff-faced water snake or masked water snake

Non-Venomus

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SternAAlbifrons
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Re: Please help identify the snake

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:20 pm

Allowing for light, photography and colour variation, I reckon it is most probably ?? a
Speckle-bellied Keelback Rhabdophis chrysargos

This wide-ranging keelback inhabits lowland and lower montane forests to around 1700 metres elevation. It is typically found near watercourses, but probably explores well beyond the confines of such habitats.
Maximum Size : 98 cm
Eats mainly frogs. Widespread in the region

Warning. These snakes are hesitant to strike, but they have a potent venom. In the 1970s they were considered being harmless and traded as pets, but a few severe and lethal bites later, they were reclassified as dangerous venomous snakes.
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timmydownawell
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Re: Please help identify the snake

Post by timmydownawell » Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:25 pm

Let it bite you on the finger and report back.
No matter how much it rains, the dirt never washes away.
dontbeasourlemon
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Re: Please help identify the snake

Post by dontbeasourlemon » Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:36 pm

Honestly, I would need a better picture to have any chance to identify it myself as I'm not an expert. You may want to reach out to a Herpetology department or two at a college. Usually lots of undergrads so someone can possibly answer with a firmer answerer (I did that once with a weird bug and got an answer in two days). Often signs of a venomous snake would be slitted pupil, triangle head, bright colors. However, none of those is a guaranteed sign as a lot of species will mimic another to be safe.
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John Bingham
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Re: Please help identify the snake

Post by John Bingham » Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:16 am

There are Facebook groups which deal specifically with Cambodian wildlife and there are many experts on them who are very good at identifying animals.
SternAAlbifrons
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Re: Please help identify the snake

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Sun Jun 02, 2019 3:35 am

https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/did-y ... nous-snake

Hey H85, The above link show the fallacy of the commonly held belief about the shape of a snake's head/eyes being a reliable indicator of its venomousness.

The two previous posts are quite correct - professional help is available.
Alternatively, if you are not a snake expert, a fab way to increase your knowledge is to do the research yourself. I spent an engrossing couple of hours looking for your snake all around the google world, and now both my knowledge and my interest have been sharpened. This kind of exercise is a great entry point into the wonderful world of natural science.

After spending many years in Australia i was pretty relaxed about snakes. In australia all venomous snakes are terrestrial, and if you walk with even a softish footfall, they will pick up the vibration and slither away before you realise they are there.

However after a few years here i realised Cambodians generally have an extremely heightened fear of snakes.
Then, i read a book by a former north vietnamese soldier who said they were much more scared of snakes than of B52 bombers. Neither my wife nor the vietcong are stupid, so i trained myself to develop a bit more fear.

In cambodia many venomous snakes are arboreal, so they aint gonna slither away at the vibration from your walking, and you can easily brush one on overhanging branches.
There are also a number of rock dwelling viper species, so you can easily disturb one hiding under any rock you dislodge - or when you sit down on for a rest.
Cobras are terrestrial, but are highly territorial and often will choose to attack rather than retreat.

Thanks for your photograph, please send any similar queries you have in future. We need a bit more natural science on CEO.
(I reckon)
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