Little gas stoves are dangerous

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General Mackevili
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by General Mackevili » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:21 pm


StroppyChops wrote:
General Mackevili wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:15 pm
Yet another reason I hate cooking.
But ... bacon.
Knowing that someone else risked their life to cook it makes it taste that much better. :)
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by Kuroneko » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:31 pm

SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:47 am
RickyBobby wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:11 am
Is it because they re-fill the containers and their subsequent re-use is dangerous?
These small cans are meant to be refilled - you swap your empties when you re-stock.
No they are not! It states on the cylinder they are not refillable although we know people do that here.
read the safety note on a canister here: https://www.webstaurantstore.com/butane ... U1000.html Click on the third small pic under the main one to read what is on the back of the canister.

In Philippines it is illegal.
THE Department of Energy (DOE) in Central Visayas has warned the public of its continued campaign against the use of butane canisters being refilled with Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) because it is unsafe and illegal. Engineer Rey Malleza, DOE-Central Visayas director, issued the warning during his weekend visit to Dumaguete City. Citing provisions of the law, Malleza warned butane canister refillers in Negros Oriental and in other areas that they will be prosecuted and face the possibility of business closure for operating without permits.

At the news conference, the DOE officials presented samples of refilled canisters that were confiscated by Cebu city traffic enforcers from a delivery boy last week.

The canisters looked worn out and stained with rust. They didn’t have safety caps or any cover. The canisters were labeled “for one time use, disposable and should never be refilled”.
Citom has pledged to help in the campaign within Cebu City. https://cebudailynews.inquirer.net/3250 ... ire-hazard
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:24 pm

Kuroneko wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:31 pm
SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:47 am
RickyBobby wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:11 am
Is it because they re-fill the containers and their subsequent re-use is dangerous?
These small cans are meant to be refilled - you swap your empties when you re-stock.
No they are not! It states on the cylinder they are not refillable although we know people do that here....
...In Philippines it is illegal.
...The canisters looked worn out and stained with rust. They didn’t have safety caps or any cover. The canisters were labeled “for one time use, disposable and should never be refilled”.
Citom has pledged to help in the campaign within Cebu City...
Hey Kuroneko - You, the can, and the Philippino cops are all correct.
Strictly speaking they should not be refilled, nor should the be used inside.

But I am talking about everyday reality in Cambodia.
The people that use these cans do not have kitchens like the one photographed in that link.
Different world.
Hopefully, one day, first world safety standards will be feasible and affordable here too.
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by Kuroneko » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:54 pm

SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:24 pm
Kuroneko wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:31 pm
SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:47 am
RickyBobby wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:11 am
Is it because they re-fill the containers and their subsequent re-use is dangerous?
These small cans are meant to be refilled - you swap your empties when you re-stock.
No they are not! It states on the cylinder they are not refillable although we know people do that here....
...In Philippines it is illegal.
...The canisters looked worn out and stained with rust. They didn’t have safety caps or any cover. The canisters were labeled “for one time use, disposable and should never be refilled”.
Citom has pledged to help in the campaign within Cebu City...
Hey Kuroneko - You, the can, and the Philippino cops are all correct.
Strictly speaking they should not be refilled, nor should the be used inside.

But I am talking about everyday reality in Cambodia.
The people that use these cans do not have kitchens like the one photographed in that link.
Different world.
Hopefully, one day, first world safety standards will be feasible and affordable here too.
I am aware of that, i was just correcting the statement that "cans are meant to be refilled" my answer was that they are not, although I said that I know that people do that. Its a brief intervention to let people reading this thread that arn't aware don't go and condone refilling of cartridges. I acknowledged that local people without much money do this.

The government here are aware of the problem and launched safety protocols around this issue. In March 2015, the Ministry of Mines and Energy launched a new safety initiative requiring petrol shop owners to have certificates acknowledging that their shops follow proper safety protocols. The directive was issued in part because of a series of fires that damaged property and claimed lives.

Note: Liquid petrol refers to as propane or butane – is a flammable mixture of hydrocarbon gases popularly used in Cambodia as fuel in heating and cooking equipment.

Small shops must submit to inspections from the ministry to assess potential risks. Vendors may be required to implement safety measures, such as building dividers to isolate the petrol. The ministry may use its discretion to close a business operating unsafely.

The above directive was issued in part because of a series of fires that damaged property and claimed lives.

Eg. In February 2013, nine women in Phnom Penh’s Por Sen Chey district were badly injured when a petrol canister they were cooking with exploded and ignited five nearby canisters also used for cooking. https://www.khmertimeskh.com/57434/gas- ... usinesses/

Gas explosion in Phnom Penh injures nine Feb 2013
Residents jumped from second-storey windows yesterday to escape a gas explosion that badly burned nine female factory workers as they were preparing a meal on their day off in Choam Chao commune in the capital’s Por Sen Chey district.

Commune chief Soth Sat said that six small, corroded canisters of cooking fuel exploded, burning the faces and bodies of the women, who were making rice on their one-day Meak Bochea holiday.

“During their holiday from the factory, they were having a rest in their rental house, and then they cooked a meal with gas,” he said.

Eighteen-year-old Srey Vy, one of the victims who was sent to Calmette, said the scene after the explosion was chaotic, with workers who lived nearby running out of their rooms, and others taking desperate measures to escape the building where the explosion occurred.

“Two female workers jumped from the second storey of the rental house, and were injured,” she said.
“I saw this; they were shocked and ran out.”
Vy said that the burns to the women’s faces were especially hard to bear.
“We were proud of our looks,” she said.
“We did not expect this to happen.”
https://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/ ... jures-nine
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by cptrelentless » Tue Apr 16, 2019 12:17 am

It's fucking 50c more to buy an unused one, do I look like Rockefeller?
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by RickyBobby » Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:51 am

I have one of these little cookers in my western life; its made in Japan. It has shut down before, and when I checked, the canister is hot. Therefore, it seems to me there's some kind of sensor or build in safety.

I also do not sit with it in front of me and cook while I eat. I am not in front of it much, and not for any length of time. I have warned my lady to strategically position herself and the stove to mitigate against this kind of disaster.

I like the barbecue places which use charcoal fire stoves at the table.

Be safe everyone.
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by GMJS-CEO » Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:59 am

Switched over to the countertops and large gas containers. Those little refillable ones blew out on us before.
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by TOG » Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:31 am

RickyBobby wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:51 am

Be safe everyone.
You want to be careful with charcoal BBQs. They have proven to be carcinogenic.

https://nutritiouslife.com/live-conscio ... cinogenic/
http://www.foodreference.com/html/a-chargrl-warn.html
https://www.medicinenet.com/does_bbq_me ... er/ask.htm
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by RickyBobby » Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:42 am

TOG wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:31 am
RickyBobby wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:51 am

Be safe everyone.
You want to be careful with charcoal BBQs. They have proven to be carcinogenic.

https://nutritiouslife.com/live-conscio ... cinogenic/
http://www.foodreference.com/html/a-chargrl-warn.html
https://www.medicinenet.com/does_bbq_me ... er/ask.htm
Well, thanks, I will look, but I cannot remember them even smoking or it affecting the air I breathe.
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Re: Little gas stoves are dangerous

Post by AndyKK » Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:12 am

The government here are aware of the problem and launched safety protocols around this issue. In March 2015, the Ministry of Mines and Energy launched a new safety initiative requiring petrol shop owners to have certificates acknowledging that their shops follow proper safety protocols.

This above posted by Kuroneko.

Safety protocols around this issue are not followed in the first instance by the one's who make the protocols, so the safety issues what are put forward have little chance of being followed. Firstly the government should be protecting it's supporting people, making the price and availability of new bottles cheaper to the general public, knowing the manufacturer's guide and warning that the bottles should not be refilled, and carry risk if done so. I don't know the company that are the suppliers of the gas bottles, but there should be some strong negotiations with them, or alternative suplier/manufacturers, possibly for a used once bottle, on a return basics. It may also be possible that the manufacturer could refill a
once used bottle, again it would certainly be a controled safety environment, with the issue of refills but with expertise. One would think if a Japanese company was the supplier it would be a possibility.
Or there could be even be a chance of an alternative sort, at least for the less fortunate, whom even find refilled one's expensive. Such as a discount price to low income families.
I don't see the country, piping in mains gas at any time in the near future.
Also It may have other advantageous in reducing the amount of plastic bottles being used as fuel.
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