Cambodian Food

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explorer
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by explorer » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:18 pm

John Bingham wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 8:30 am
explorer wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:53 am
It is common in Cambodia to meet people in their 30s who have had a stroke.
It is? How can you tell they've had a stroke?
1. They have been to the doctor, and the doctor has told them they had a stroke.

2. When someone has a stroke, part of the brain dies, and the part of the body controlled by that part of the brain no longer functions. Different strokes can affect different parts of the brain and different parts of the body. One example is, a person cannot use their left arm or left leg.
## I thought I knew all the answers, but they changed all the questions. ##
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by davegorman » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:48 pm

[Admin Edit: Be a bit nicer to fellow members. Thank you very much.]
Chamboy
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by Chamboy » Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:15 pm

Spigzy wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:45 pm
Image

Seems legit, 54% combined in agriculture & industry, whisk off some for management levels & you're probably around 50%. :-)
Yep, that's how explorer arrives at his non varifiable "facts.". We'll "whisk some off here" and add some there and presto-point proven.
Last edited by Chamboy on Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kammekor
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by Kammekor » Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:24 pm

Chamboy wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:15 pm
Spigzy wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:45 pm
Image

Seems legit, 54% combined in agriculture & industry, whisk off some for management levels & you're probably around 50%. :-)
Yep, that's how explorer arrives at his non variafiable "facts.". We'll "whisk some off here" and add some there and presto-point proven.
Aren't facts just the opinions published on wikipedia these days?

:stir:
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:33 am

Kammekor wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:24 pm
Chamboy wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 3:15 pm
Spigzy wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:45 pm
Image

Seems legit, 54% combined in agriculture & industry, whisk off some for management levels & you're probably around 50%. :-)
Yep, that's how explorer arrives at his non variafiable "facts.". We'll "whisk some off here" and add some there and presto-point proven.
Aren't facts just the opinions published on wikipedia these days?

:stir:
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newkidontheblock
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by newkidontheblock » Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:58 am

Chamboy wrote:You are talking about a few good meals, I am talking about nearly 20 years of prison food.
Sorry, I’ve never have prison food. I’ve never been to prison. What’s it like? What food do they serve in prison? Is it like western public school cafeteria food?

I joking describe a prisoner diet - ie, bread and water only, as a way to lose weight fast and be absolutely miserable while doing so.
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by bittermelon » Tue May 28, 2019 2:36 pm

Agree with the prevailing sentiment re the food in Cambodia BUT then on the other hand...
I get the impression that when people are as poor as many in Cambodia are food is just a matter of survival and isn't really expected to be enjoyable.
I remember the first time I visited the K.O.W, crossing the Koh Kong border. Wasn't sure where my next meal would be so had a lunch of Thai grilled chicken, sticky rice and somtam- Thai street food. The first Cambodian street food I saw was one of those glass carts selling baguettes with tinned mackerel. I might be wrong but I can't imagine anyone getting excited bout a cardboard "baguette" filled with tomato sauce and mackerel-its survival food.
However after a few weeks in Thailand there are things that I miss that I haven't come across there. I generally eat at those 1$ a dish places with a bunch of pots with soup and trays with stir-fried type stuff. Ginger chicken, bittermelon soup, Vietnamese sour fish soup, pork with pineapple and tomato. Similar places in Thailand I guess but a lot of the time the stuff is so spicy that if I can handle it on the intake well- enough said. Both countries seem to suffer from putting sugar in "savoury" dishes, maybe the sugar gives a short term appetite satisfaction more cheaply than meat??
I also miss the pork, egg, pickled veges and rice breakfast, haven't really come across that next door. And then the Khmer chicken, they're scrawny but more than make up for it in flavour.
A couple of things I find curious about the diet that someone might know more about- beans, they don't use them much do they? I think I've only encountered beans in the bamboo sticky rice. In other poor countries such as India and in South American countries where animal protein is expensive they use these a lot as a protein source.
Also coconut cream, when I was a poor student we used the canned stuff often as it was a way of making vegetarian food satisfying. Considering they seem to have coconuts "for Africa" they don't seem to use it much. Or is this just in the cheap urban restaurants away from the source. Or are the local coconuts less suitable for extracting cream?
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by Username Taken » Tue May 28, 2019 3:50 pm

To make coconut cream, you need old mature coconuts.
I think Cambodians don't want to wait that long to make money. Harvest them while they're green (for drinking) before someone else comes along and pinches them.
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

https://BooksAboutCambodia.com
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Kuroneko
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by Kuroneko » Tue May 28, 2019 5:25 pm

FYI According to the latest WHO data published in 2017 Stroke Deaths in Cambodia reached 10,318 or 12.24% of total deaths. The age adjusted Death Rate is 119.57 per 100,000 of population ranks Cambodia #43 in the world.

Here's a list of all countries ranked in order of "stroke prevalence", Indonesia is the highest, with an age adjusted Death Rate of 186.29 per 100,000 of population, which accounts for 332,663 or 19.79% of total deaths.
https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cau ... y-country/

I realise that stroke related death figures have varied somewhat from about 4% in 2013. (CDC Global Health - Cambodia)

From a 2012 report Burden of stroke in Cambodia. Loo KW1, Gan SH,Int J Stroke. 2013 Aug;8(6):475-8.

In Cambodia, stroke is not ranked among the top 10 leading causes of death, but infectious disease are among the top three leading causes of death. This finding could be attributed to a lack of awareness among Cambodians of the signs and symptoms of stroke or to poor reporting, incomplete data, lack of neurologists and neurosurgeons, or low accessibility to the hospitals. The only study of stroke in Cambodia is the Prevalence of Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Cambodia survey, which identified several stroke-related risk factors in the population. Tobacco chewing or smoking is the main risk factor for stroke in Cambodia.
explorer
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Re: Cambodian Food

Post by explorer » Tue May 28, 2019 7:00 pm

How often are strokes fatal?

Stroke can be fatal. In fact, stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Strokes result in death 17 percent of the time. So one-in-six strokes are fatal. The remaining five-in-six strokes are nonfatal but can cause permanent weakness, visual loss, language and other cognitive deficits, and other impairments.

https://www.sharecare.com/health/stroke/is-stroke-fatal

According to this, five-in-six strokes are nonfatal, but many of the people who have them live with a disability after having the stroke.

All over the world people have strokes. In Cambodia, many people have them at a younger age than places where people have a better diet.
## I thought I knew all the answers, but they changed all the questions. ##
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