Language love

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taabarang
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Language love

Post by taabarang » Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:10 pm

When I notice language similarities in words that come from disparate countries in the world, I become intrigued in their history and their protolanguage.

For example the following serves my purpose well. Consider the English "cow" with the German "Kuh" and the Khmer "koh.". While the English word in all probability finds its roots in the German, the Khmer is obviously not a loan word from the French " vache." Also in English we talk about so many head of cattle while the Khmer similarly talk about "koh" so many "khbaal" which indicates a similar psychology while the words are unrelated.

Granted, interest in this will not help you to acquire a
new language even though you pursue it out of love for language. So, does anyone share this interest or have further examples?


hhttps://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/24/science/new- ... glish.html
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that genius
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Re: Language loveless

Post by that genius » Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:19 pm

Huh?

https://www.newstatesman.com/martha-gil ... y-language

fwiw I'm also interested in this

Noam Chomsky has written several good books on linguistics, mostly during the 70s, but still relevant

More recently Steven Pinker

Another thing that interests me is what effect latitude and climate play on accent
taabarang
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Re: Language love

Post by taabarang » Fri Sep 07, 2018 5:48 pm

"Another thing that interests me is what effect latitude and climate play on accent."

Curious. What existing evidence can you point to?
As my old Cajun bait seller used to say, "I opes you luck.
taabarang
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Re: Language love

Post by taabarang » Fri Sep 07, 2018 6:50 pm

taabarang wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 5:48 pm
"Another thing that interests me is what effect latitude and climate play on accent."

Curious. What existing evidence can you point to?
C'mon TG cough up.
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Jamie_Lambo
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Re: Language love

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:04 pm

taabarang wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:10 pm
When I notice language similarities in words that come from disparate countries in the world, I become intrigued in their history and their protolanguage.

For example the following serves my purpose well. Consider the English "cow" with the German "Kuh" and the Khmer "koh.". While the English word in all probability finds its roots in the German, the Khmer is obviously not a loan word from the French " vache." Also in English we talk about so many head of cattle while the Khmer similarly talk about "koh" so many "khbaal" which indicates a similar psychology while the words are unrelated.
yeah this is always something i love noticing, as i love history,
Modern English is such a bastard language that has evolved over the past 2000 years, and is why England has so many different dialects/accents in such a small country,
British English is a mixture of Celtic, Latin, Germanic, Anglo Saxon, Old Norse and French languages all mixed together, while Standard English is the evolved form that is taught globally, in England its still a mixture of regional dialects using many adopted words depending on what area of the country you come from, Northern/East Midland English still uses words from/influenced by Celtic and Old Norse/Scandinavian languages from Pre-Roman and the Viking takeover of Northern/Eastern England,

eg. where im from we still use a lot of the old Norse adopted from the Vikings,
we dont really say "Hello", we greet each other with " Ey'up Mi Duck"...
"Ey'up" comes from the Old Norse "Se upp" meaning "look up"
"Mi" comes from the Old Norse "Min" meaning "My"
and "Duck" comes from "Duka" meaning "Duke" (which was a respectful form of address to Anglo Saxons)

another example is we sometimes use the word "scraight" meaning to cry/scream (eg. scraight like a baby) which comes from the Old Norse "skrike" meaning the same
So, does anyone share this interest or have further examples?
yeah this has to be one of my favourites...
Image
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
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Re: Language love

Post by taabarang » Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:38 pm

Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:04 pm
taabarang wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:10 pm
When I notice language similarities in words that come from disparate countries in the world, I become intrigued in their history and their protolanguage.

For example the following serves my purpose well. Consider the English "cow" with the German "Kuh" and the Khmer "koh.". While the English word in all probability finds its roots in the German, the Khmer is obviously not a loan word from the French " vache." Also in English we talk about so many head of cattle while the Khmer similarly talk about "koh" so many "khbaal" which indicates a similar psychology while the words are unrelated.
yeah this is always something i love noticing, as i love history,
Modern English is such a bastard language that has evolved over the past 2000 years, and is why England has so many different dialects/accents in such a small country,
British English is a mixture of Celtic, Latin, Germanic, Anglo Saxon, Old Norse and French languages all mixed together, while Standard English is the evolved form that is taught globally, in England its still a mixture of regional dialects using many adopted words depending on what area of the country you come from, Northern/East Midland English still uses words from/influenced by Celtic and Old Norse/Scandinavian languages from Pre-Roman and the Viking takeover of Northern/Eastern England,

eg. where im from we still use a lot of the old Norse adopted from the Vikings,
we dont really say "Hello", we greet each other with " Ey'up Mi Duck"...
"Ey'up" comes from the Old Norse "Se upp" meaning "look up"
"Mi" comes from the Old Norse "Min" meaning "My"
and "Duck" comes from "Duka" meaning "Duke" (which was a respectful form of address to Anglo Saxons)

another example is we sometimes use the word "scraight" meaning to cry/scream (eg. scraight like a baby) which comes from the Old Norse "skrike" meaning the same
So, does anyone share this interest or have further examples?
yeah this has to be one of my favourites...
Image
Hi Father punchy always nice to hear from you. Fully agree with your observations which are well documented and indisputable. When I was backpacking in Norway I heard the word "barn" used for child and immediately thought of the Scottish Gaelic "bairn", probably from Robert Burn's poetry. However I am looking for related antecedents from ancient from Indo European languages thousands of years older.

"another example is we sometimes use the word "scraight" meaning to cry/scream (eg. scraight like a baby) which comes from the Old Norse "skrike" meaning the same."

So for example(farfetched tho it may be) does this seem related to Khmer "sraik"/meaning to yell!
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Re: Language love

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Fri Sep 07, 2018 9:04 pm

taabarang wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:38 pm
Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:04 pm
taabarang wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:10 pm
When I notice language similarities in words that come from disparate countries in the world, I become intrigued in their history and their protolanguage.

For example the following serves my purpose well. Consider the English "cow" with the German "Kuh" and the Khmer "koh.". While the English word in all probability finds its roots in the German, the Khmer is obviously not a loan word from the French " vache." Also in English we talk about so many head of cattle while the Khmer similarly talk about "koh" so many "khbaal" which indicates a similar psychology while the words are unrelated.
yeah this is always something i love noticing, as i love history,
Modern English is such a bastard language that has evolved over the past 2000 years, and is why England has so many different dialects/accents in such a small country,
British English is a mixture of Celtic, Latin, Germanic, Anglo Saxon, Old Norse and French languages all mixed together, while Standard English is the evolved form that is taught globally, in England its still a mixture of regional dialects using many adopted words depending on what area of the country you come from, Northern/East Midland English still uses words from/influenced by Celtic and Old Norse/Scandinavian languages from Pre-Roman and the Viking takeover of Northern/Eastern England,

eg. where im from we still use a lot of the old Norse adopted from the Vikings,
we dont really say "Hello", we greet each other with " Ey'up Mi Duck"...
"Ey'up" comes from the Old Norse "Se upp" meaning "look up"
"Mi" comes from the Old Norse "Min" meaning "My"
and "Duck" comes from "Duka" meaning "Duke" (which was a respectful form of address to Anglo Saxons)

another example is we sometimes use the word "scraight" meaning to cry/scream (eg. scraight like a baby) which comes from the Old Norse "skrike" meaning the same
So, does anyone share this interest or have further examples?
yeah this has to be one of my favourites...
Image
Hi Father punchy always nice to hear from you. Fully agree with your observations which are well documented and indisputable. When I was backpacking in Norway I heard the word "barn" used for child and immediately thought of the Scottish Gaelic "bairn", probably from Robert Burn's poetry. However I am looking for related antecedents from ancient from Indo European languages thousands of years older.

"another example is we sometimes use the word "scraight" meaning to cry/scream (eg. scraight like a baby) which comes from the Old Norse "skrike" meaning the same."

So for example(farfetched tho it may be) does this seem related to Khmer "sraik"/meaning to yell!
yeah you are totally right and its not just in Scottish but "Bairn" is used all the way down to South Yorkshire, and another good example :thumb:

yeah this is something i noticed and made me curious when i first learned the word ស្រែក "Sraek/Sraik" - To shout/yell/cry out, as it means and is used in exactly the same way as the "Scraight/Skrike" that i mentioned :thumb:
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
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Re: Language love

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sun Sep 09, 2018 9:43 pm

@taabarang i was thinking yesterday morning about more modern western words that are now quite common in Khmer, i did write a post yesterday but i ended up accidentally deleting the tab and losing it all, so this is a 2nd attempt done through boredom, some at the end ive not yet seen a commonly used Khmer script for yet and just the English is used, even in Khmer music videos (ill give examples of those at the bottom)

ប៉ូលីស - Bolis/Bolih - Police
កុំព្យូទរ័ - Kompyutaer - Computer
វិទ្យុ - Widyu - Radio
ម៉ូតូ - Moto - Motorbike
គីឡូ - Kilo - Kilos
ក្រាម - Kram - Grams
ម៉ែត្រ - Maet - Meter
គីឡូក្រាម - Kilokram - Kilograms
គីឡូម៉ែត្រ - Kilomaet - Kilometer
បាស - Bas/Bah - Bass (as in Music bass, but not pronounced bace, used with the word ធុង - Tung - Speaker, ធុងបាស - Tung Bass (the big black boombox speakers Khmers use everywhere) and បុកបាស meaning music with a pounding bass)
សិចស៊ី - Sech Sii - Sexy
អាយដុល - Aai Dol - Idol (someone you admire/idolise) (maybe became more popular use because of the Cambodian Idol TV show)
Call - To Call (as in to call someone on the telephone, not by shouting out to them, they have words for that)
Crush - Crush (as in someone you admire/fancy, not meaning to crush something) (you may also see this written as 4141)
Single - Single (as in not being in a relationship single)
Fan - Fan (as in the admirer of someone or an Idol/being a fan of someone)
Cute - Cute

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
Barang chgout
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Re: Language love

Post by Barang chgout » Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:45 pm

You forget
Moh ney and han sum.


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Re: Language love

Post by Chandra8 » Thu Jul 11, 2019 1:58 pm

Edited to add that meeting others is easy. People will even hand hold you to make it easier via FB groups


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