77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

This is a part of our Cambodia forums to chat about anything Cambodia-related. This discussion forum is at the top of our site because it's usually the busiest part of the expat community chatter with random topics on just about everything, including expat life, Khmer politics, Cambodian blogs we have or have come across, or whatever else our members want to discuss. Whether you're an expatriate, tourist, Cambodian or random traveler just passing through South East Asia, you are welcome to talk about anything or start new topics yourselves.
User avatar
Username Taken
Raven
Posts: 10530
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 6:53 pm
Reputation: 1958
Contact:
Cambodia

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by Username Taken » Sun Jun 11, 2017 9:27 pm

Luigi wrote:
Sun Jun 11, 2017 8:11 pm
Kuroneko wrote,
'' When wearing a hat, it would be suitable etiquette to take it off when going indoors, into a shop or when talking to a lady on the street.

Wondering why this is. Any ideas where it originated.
I'm not as old as Kuroneko, but when I was in Primary school we had to wear the school cap. My mother told us that when we passed a woman on the street, we had to tip/touch our cap. Unfortunately, she also told the neighborhood women who would purposely walk out of their homes when they saw us coming just so we had to tip our cap.
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

https://BooksAboutCambodia.com
User avatar
John Bingham
Expatriate
Posts: 6699
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:26 pm
Reputation: 2547
Yemen

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by John Bingham » Sun Jun 11, 2017 10:29 pm

My parent's weren't too strict, but I remember getting thrashed by them a few times too (usually for good reasons, like throwing rocks at passing cars etc). Teachers used to be fairly nasty when I was in school. After corporal punishment got banned around 1984 they didn't even acknowledge it and they beat the shit out of us worse than before. In this period I had both eardrums perforated, one time by a lay teacher and the next by a fucking monk.
So anyway I don't generally hit my kid, unless he does something really dangerous. His mom is one of those 77%, which wouldn't bother me except that the punishments always seem very arbitrary, and I can't see what the point is except just perpetuating obedience to idiocy.
AE86
Expatriate
Posts: 852
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2014 8:36 am
Reputation: 80
Japan

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by AE86 » Sun Jun 11, 2017 10:46 pm

John Bingham wrote:
Sun Jun 11, 2017 10:29 pm
His mom is one of those 77%, which wouldn't bother me except that the punishments always seem very arbitrary, and I can't see what the point is except just perpetuating obedience to idiocy.
One of things that gets my blood boiling is arbitrary punishments. I honestly think idiotic tyrants are what leads to blowback from the rebellious kids who wont have any of it, which in turn starts a nasty cycle of behaviour getting worse and punishments getting harsher, which might explain why "unruly" kids often are abused.

Personally I believe most children that are abused come from similar situations at home.
Reckless driving cucumber - 成
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10598
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1016
Australia

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by StroppyChops » Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:05 pm

AE86 wrote:
Sun Jun 11, 2017 6:41 pm
I'm expecting pushback on this, but I see nothing wrong with hitting out of line children. Just my opinion, but there are some lessons I really didn't learn until I got my ass handed to me in a fight after shooting my mouth off, so I don't buy into this zero aggression parenting.

When I say hit though, I don't mean hitting to cause harm as some parent do when they're overly frustrated with their children. I think there is a big difference between spanking, rulers on the hand or a smack upside the head vs. punches, hard slaps, kicking, choking, etc. Clearly there are limits, but some wild unruly kids (like myself) really needed a good hit to knock some sense into.

For me it has nothing to do with culture as I never had parents around and my mother never disciplined me for anything. Could be inherent in my East Asian brain though.
Unless there have been changes in the last five years, the laws in each state of Australia (as it's a state-level jurisdictional matter) were variations on - corporal punishment is only illegal if it happens above the shoulders, or leaves a lasting mark. A lasting mark is defined as any mark that can still be seen by the naked eye after 24 hours.

This was drilled into us at foster training, but then made redundant as it is unlawful for foster parents to use any corporal punishment. Weird - or maybe not.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10598
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1016
Australia

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by StroppyChops » Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:09 pm

Kuroneko wrote:
Sun Jun 11, 2017 7:54 pm
Consequences of Discipline in the '50s

Today, many look back at the '50s and see the corporal punishments that adults inflicted on children as unnecessary and unfair. However, elders who look back at what life was like in the '50s see a lack of morals in today's society that affects how children grow up. Negative influences on children that did not exist in the '50s, such as violent video games and movies, are of continued concern. It logically follows that we can choose to pick out the "good" parts about what it was like to be a child in the 1950s and avoid the "bad" parts and integrate them into what it means to be a child today. A healthy dose of discipline and structure and a general respect toward society are all important lessons we can take from the discipline of the 1950s.

Discipline at Home in the '50s

Children had to stand up on any occasion when an adult would enter the room, even if that adult was the child's parent. On the bus, it was expected that boys would give up their seat for a woman or anyone senior in age and also give up their places in line for the bus. You could never leave the table at dinner time without asking permission first. Children had to say "please" and "thank you," and if they didn't use these words correctly, they would be informed by adults that they were being rude. When wearing a hat, it would be suitable etiquette to take it off when going indoors, into a shop or when talking to a lady on the street. A child would be taught to say, "I would like," and was taught never to say the words, "I want." Opening the door for someone, especially a woman or an adult, was necessary, as was letting her exit before the child did so.
http://peopleof.oureverydaylife.com/dis ... -9201.html
I understand you're quoting an article, but I think the closer truth would be if you replace "children had to.." or "boys would..." with "men and children were expected to..." for most examples. I was raised to always stand when a woman entered the room or later stood (although the last part decreased over time), to ALWAYS offer my chair to a lady or more senior man, and to always remove my hat before entering a building. Having a hat on indicates you're not prepared to stay, putting it on indicates you're about to leave.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
User avatar
Hotdigr
Expatriate
Posts: 1182
Joined: Tue May 13, 2014 12:22 pm
Reputation: 179

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by Hotdigr » Mon Jun 12, 2017 3:16 pm

I was strapped by my old man occasionally as a kid and mum was legendary with her wooden spoon skills. But NEVER without good reason and it was only a very occasional thing. The old man never strapped my younger sisters, although mum would occasionally crack them on the arse with the wooden spoon. School was different. I went to private Catholic schools from year 7 on. The Jesuits were bastards, but the Christian brothers were quite simply sadistic cunts. Yes, I was a rebellious little shit and deserved it sometimes, but with the Christian Brothers it became almost a daily occurrence. It ultimately drove me away from both school and Christianity. Oh well, no great loss. And in the long run, no lasting harm done.
I occasionally strapped my son, but being that he was into the outdoor life, grounding him from surfing used to work better with him.
TL;DR - I see no problem with occasionally physically disciplining kids,in fact sometimes it is necessary, PROVIDED you don't lose control and as long as it is a last resort, not the primary way you discipline them. :whip:
User avatar
rozzieoz
Expatriate
Posts: 2781
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2014 3:51 pm
Reputation: 866
Australia

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by rozzieoz » Mon Jun 12, 2017 3:22 pm

I know some expats who need a damn good thrashing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Once you've read the dictionary, every other book is just a remix.
willyhilly
Expatriate
Posts: 1432
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2016 7:11 am
Reputation: 244
Location: Australia
Albania

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by willyhilly » Mon Jun 12, 2017 4:57 pm

The floggings will continue until morale improves.
Jerry Atrick
Expatriate
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 4:19 pm
Reputation: 330
Central African Republic

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by Jerry Atrick » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:06 pm

I wish my other half would hit our kids a bit more, TBH.

They get away with murder.

I got the wooden spoon from mum quite often, but outgrew it by 9, so it was superseded by a length of 2x4 and/or a steel rulers edge.

Don't recall my dad ever lifting a hand though.
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13806
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1997
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: 77% of Cambodian parents use physical punishment against children.

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:55 pm

i see nothing wrong with a kid getting a spanked bottom as a line of discipline
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Anchor Moy, Bing [Bot], BrazilBoy, Google Adsense [Bot], Whatsupdoc and 466 guests