China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by bolueeleh » Tue May 08, 2018 12:12 pm

why do najib cares? he already has his own personal bank account (1MDB) top up by the saudis
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by that genius » Tue May 08, 2018 12:52 pm

xxxxxxx wrote:
that genius wrote:
Sun Apr 22, 2018 4:53 pm
xxxxxxx wrote:
Sun Apr 22, 2018 8:46 am
When one country has a $500 billion trade deficit with another country, it is ridiculous to say "they need each other" in anything resembling equal amounts.
Who said that?

You have a habit of selectively quoting people and them putting words in their mouths.
Image
Wheee...I can post a picture! You implied I said X amd based your whole post on that ? Stupid or deceitful? Both?
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by CEOCambodiaNews » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:22 am

China’s ‘Belt and Road Initiative’: after five years, is the bloom off the rose?
A strategic environment much changed since Xi Jinping unveiled the massive infrastructure plan in 2013 has the country’s top leaders wondering how far this grand enterprise can go
PUBLISHED : Sunday, 07 October, 2018, 8:32pm
UPDATED : Monday, 08 October, 2018, 4:41pm
China credits President Xi Jinping’s massive infrastructure plan, the “Belt and Road Initiative”, with sparking a surge in the construction of railways, roads, bridges and ports across more than 65 countries and regions.

Five years after its launch, however, a litany of risks and criticism and a changing strategic environment have the country’s top leaders wondering just how far this grand and ambitious enterprise can go.

A new sense of urgency was palpable when Xi asked belt and road officials for their reports on the risks facing various projects, a source with knowledge of the gathering early this year told the South China Morning Post...
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diploma ... bloom-rose
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by TOG » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:32 am

Why do we bother listening to all of those "experts" rambling on about global warning and how we must stop using cars when China and even Germany are just plowing on building coal fired power stations that make a mockery of any discussions.

If they don't care, why should we?

https://www.chinadialogue.net/blog/1076 ... r-again/en

http://www.airclim.org/acidnews/germany ... r-stations
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by newkidontheblock » Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:11 am

TOG wrote:Why do we bother listening to all of those "experts" rambling on about global warning and how we must stop using cars when China and even Germany are just plowing on building coal fired power stations that make a mockery of any discussions.

If they don't care, why should we?

https://www.chinadialogue.net/blog/1076 ... r-again/en

http://www.airclim.org/acidnews/germany ... r-stations
Exactly the analysis of the Trump administration.
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by TOG » Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:31 am

newkidontheblock wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:11 am
Exactly the analysis of the Trump administration.
Ever heard of pissing into the wind?

That is exactly what the experts would have us do.

Until China and other countries like them agree to cut back on emissions, our feeble attempts mean diddly squat.

Tell you what, you get China to alter their position and I will give up my gas guzzling cars.......Can't be done. Be a realist.
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by CEOCambodiaNews » Sat Nov 17, 2018 6:41 pm

Are China's cheap loans to poor nations a development boost or a debt trap?
By Sean Mantesso
Updated Fri at 7:53am
China is in the midst of a rapid push to gain economic and political ascendancy across the globe — and it is splashing out billions of dollars in concessional loans to developing countries in the process.

This money is used to construct much-needed major infrastructure projects, but what happens when these poorer countries cannot pay China back?

Experts warn Beijing is using bad loans as a form of entrapment, allowing the nation to gain influence and power across the world.

Here's how they say it works.
'Debt-trap diplomacy'
Poorer nations are lured by China's offers of cheap loans for transformative infrastructure projects.

Then, when these countries are unable to keep up with their repayments, Beijing can demand concessions or other advantages in exchange for debt relief.

This process is known as debt-trap diplomacy.

Sri Lanka's Hambantota Port development project serves as a cautionary tale to anyone who thinks China's loans come without conditions.

Protests erupted last year when Sri Lanka was forced to hand control of the port over to China — on a 99-year lease — in order to wipe off about $US1 billion ($1.4 billion) worth of its debt to Beijing.

China now has control of a key port on the doorstep of regional rival India, and a strategic foothold along a key commercial and military waterway.

Australia's debt-saddled neighbours
A little closer to home, Australia has been a bit sluggish to respond to China's spreading influence in the Pacific.

Chinese loans and aid have gone from almost zero to $1.8 billion in the space of a decade, and some of our neighbours are already heavily-laden with debt to Beijing.

However, China has also pledged to spend $US5.8 billion ($8 billion) in total across the Pacific region.

For instance, Beijing has promised Papua New Guinea an incredible $US3.5 billion ($4.8 billion) for a new road network, which would stem from its capital Port Moresby.

Fiji owes China half a billion dollars, and Tonga now owes more than $160 million, or one-third of its GDP.

The Tongan Government will soon begin making repayments on controversial Chinese loans that critics have said saddled the small Pacific nation with unsustainable debt.

Tonga has been forced to admit it may fail to repay its debts, stoking fears other small Pacific nations could fall into debt distress and become vulnerable to diplomatic pressure from Beijing.

In fact Tonga's Prime Minister this year even went as far as calling on the Pacific Islands to band together against China — before backtracking on that call days later, for reasons that remain unclear.

Earlier this year, reports that China was moving to create a military base in Vanuatu sparked a panic in Australia, and served as a catalyst for a renewed pivot to reclaim regional influence.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has now announced the creation of a new infrastructure bank for projects across the region, seen largely as a pushback against Chinese influence.

China's President Xi Jinping is currently in Port Moresby for this year's APEC summit, where he will hold a special meeting with Pacific Island leaders.

Mr Xi is expected to put even more concessional loans on the table at that side meeting — so watch this space.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-16/ ... 02446085=1
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by frank lee bent » Sat Nov 17, 2018 6:45 pm

The Chinese navy port in Koh Kong has now been addressed as fake news.
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by Arget » Sat Nov 17, 2018 8:08 pm

https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-u ... 031eb58098

China ‘weaponises’ tourism: How Palau may be the model of things to come

CLOSED restaurants. Empty hotel rooms. Idle tour buses. This is what happened when one nation upset China. Could a similar fate befall Australia?

Jamie Seidel, Reuters
News Corp Australia NetworkAUGUST 21, 20185:50PM

Is Communist China taking over Australia?

IT’S just a tiny cluster of islands in the western Pacific. But Palau has become the epicentre of a growing international storm between China and Taiwan.

It could be a sign of things to come.

In recent years, Beijing has lavished the tropical island paradise with financial aid, investment and state-backed tourism campaigns.

That’s all ended.

Palau, despite its tiny size, has stood up to the Chinese behemoth.

It refused to bow to pressure to end its diplomatic ties with Taiwan.

For decades Beijing has been spearheading all its international activities behind its ‘One China’ demand. Taiwan is China, Beijing insists — so other nations should not recognise their independence.

The most recent consequence of much of the West’s acceptance of this policy was the capitulation by many of the world’s airlines to Beijing’s demand that they stop referring to Taiwan as Taiwan on their flight and destination schedules.

It’s China. Even though it’s not.


Unlike Qantas and Australia, Palau stood firm.

Taiwan is an independent democratic state, it says. And Palau’s proud to share those ideals.

Now Beijing is making Palau pay the price.


HEART OF THE MATTER

Communist China insists the island of Taiwan falls under its governance. That’s it. No discussion. It’s an ‘iron-clad’ certainty.

“The One China principle is the precondition and political foundation for China to maintain and develop friendly cooperative relations with all countries around the world,” China’s Foreign Ministry says.

Taiwan feels differently.

The former Japanese protectorate was occupied by China at the end of World War II. Then the defeated Republic of China’s government, among many others, fled there when defeated by the Communist uprising on the mainland in 1949.

Ever since, it’s been a tenuous democratic state.

“While Taiwan faces serious diplomatic challenges, the government will not bow down to pressure from Beijing,” its Ministry of Foreign Affairs says.

“The Taiwan issue is a peculiar one, in that countries are now expected to make a binary choice,” says Australian National University Department of Pacific Affairs research fellow Dr Graeme Smith. “While the ‘diplomatic truce’ with Taiwan’s Kuomintang party lasted (until the Democratic Progressive Party won the 2016 election), Pacific nations felt no pressure to switch, the only thing they missed out on was PRC aid.”


Enter Palau.

It’s a country of 340 islands and attols bounded by the Philippines and Indonesia.

It’s also part of what China deems to be the ‘Second Island Chain’, a rough radius of islands including Japan and the US protectorate of Guam. It says these fall within its ‘sphere of influence’.

China has already seized control of much of its ‘first island chain’ — the disputed coral reefs and rocky outcrops of the South and East China Seas.

In recent years Palau had been the target of a Beijing charm offensive: sold to the Chinese people as an idyllic island holiday paradise — with the nessecary investment in infrastructure to support it.

But no more.

A Chinese tourist walking on a beach on the Rock Islands in Palau. Visitors to the tiny Pacific nation of Palau were made to sign a promise to respect the environment. Picture: AFP
A Chinese tourist walking on a beach on the Rock Islands in Palau. Visitors to the tiny Pacific nation of Palau were made to sign a promise to respect the environment. Picture: AFPSource:AFP


PALAU WON’T BE PUSHED

Palau’s commercial hub of Krodor is all but abandoned. Travel agencies and tour operators have boarded up their windows. Restaurants and hotels stand empty. Boats and buses sit idle.

Palau’s President Tommy Remengesau Jr says it’s all because he refused to cede to pressure from Beijing to drop diplomatic relations with Taiwan. Instead, he chose to recognise Taipei’s independence.

“It is not a secret that China would like us and the diplomatic friends of Taiwan to switch to them, but for Palau it is not our choosing to decide the One China policy,” he said in an interview with Reuters.

While Palau had welcomed Beijing’s investment and tourism, he said his nation’s democratic ideals were a closer fit with Taiwan. And he wasn’t prepared to compromise those ideals in exchange for cash.

Not all agree. Palau’s former president Johnson Toribiong says economics should trump political consequences.

And consequences there are.


Just last year, 122,000 visitors brought much needed cash into the remote islands.

Some 55,000 were from China.

Beijing went on a buying spree: it bought up prime coastal land. It built hotels. It co-ordinated tourism groups. It also organised aid packages.

Now, Beijing has branded Palau an ‘illegal destination’.

The number of Chinese tourists flying in has collapsed. Chinese investment projects sit idle.

“The implied trade-off of the pain caused to China’s investors in Palau’s tourism sector is that there will be greater opportunities for them down the line, presumably when the next Palau administration comes in,” Dr Smith says.

It’s not the first time China has ‘weaponised’ tourism.

It also banned its citizens from visiting South Korea last year after the US stationed an anti-ballistic missile defence system there in the face of North Korea’s growing aggression.

El Salvador's Foreign Minister Carlos Castaneda, left, stands next to China's Foreign Minister after the Central American nation ditched diplomatic ties with Taiwan in yet another victory for Beijing in its campaign to isolate the island. Picture: AFP
El Salvador's Foreign Minister Carlos Castaneda, left, stands next to China's Foreign Minister after the Central American nation ditched diplomatic ties with Taiwan in yet another victory for Beijing in its campaign to isolate the island.

INCREASING INTRANSIGENCE

China won’t budge on the issue of Taiwan.

Nor will it do so over its illegal island fortresses that have cemented its assertions of control over the ‘First Island Chain’ in the South and East China seas.

Is the ‘Second Island Chain’ next?

The Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands and Palau are currently supported by funding agreements with the United States. It’s a legacy from World War Two.

These agreements expire between 2023 and 24.

The US appears reluctant to renew its financial support.

China sees an opportunity.
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Re: China aims to 'Make China Great' with world's largest development plan

Post by Rogue » Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:17 pm

CEOCambodiaNews wrote:
Sat Nov 17, 2018 6:41 pm
Are China's cheap loans to poor nations a development boost or a debt trap?
By Sean Mantesso
Updated Fri at 7:53am
China is in the midst of a rapid push to gain economic and political ascendancy across the globe — and it is splashing out billions of dollars in concessional loans to developing countries in the process.

This money is used to construct much-needed major infrastructure projects, but what happens when these poorer countries cannot pay China back?

Experts warn Beijing is using bad loans as a form of entrapment, allowing the nation to gain influence and power across the world.

Here's how they say it works.
'Debt-trap diplomacy'
Poorer nations are lured by China's offers of cheap loans for transformative infrastructure projects.

Then, when these countries are unable to keep up with their repayments, Beijing can demand concessions or other advantages in exchange for debt relief.

This process is known as debt-trap diplomacy.

Sri Lanka's Hambantota Port development project serves as a cautionary tale to anyone who thinks China's loans come without conditions.

Protests erupted last year when Sri Lanka was forced to hand control of the port over to China — on a 99-year lease — in order to wipe off about $US1 billion ($1.4 billion) worth of its debt to Beijing.

China now has control of a key port on the doorstep of regional rival India, and a strategic foothold along a key commercial and military waterway.

Australia's debt-saddled neighbours
A little closer to home, Australia has been a bit sluggish to respond to China's spreading influence in the Pacific.

Chinese loans and aid have gone from almost zero to $1.8 billion in the space of a decade, and some of our neighbours are already heavily-laden with debt to Beijing.

However, China has also pledged to spend $US5.8 billion ($8 billion) in total across the Pacific region.

For instance, Beijing has promised Papua New Guinea an incredible $US3.5 billion ($4.8 billion) for a new road network, which would stem from its capital Port Moresby.

Fiji owes China half a billion dollars, and Tonga now owes more than $160 million, or one-third of its GDP.

The Tongan Government will soon begin making repayments on controversial Chinese loans that critics have said saddled the small Pacific nation with unsustainable debt.

Tonga has been forced to admit it may fail to repay its debts, stoking fears other small Pacific nations could fall into debt distress and become vulnerable to diplomatic pressure from Beijing.

In fact Tonga's Prime Minister this year even went as far as calling on the Pacific Islands to band together against China — before backtracking on that call days later, for reasons that remain unclear.

Earlier this year, reports that China was moving to create a military base in Vanuatu sparked a panic in Australia, and served as a catalyst for a renewed pivot to reclaim regional influence.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has now announced the creation of a new infrastructure bank for projects across the region, seen largely as a pushback against Chinese influence.

China's President Xi Jinping is currently in Port Moresby for this year's APEC summit, where he will hold a special meeting with Pacific Island leaders.

Mr Xi is expected to put even more concessional loans on the table at that side meeting — so watch this space.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-16/ ... 02446085=1
In regards to this, the chinese are just taking a play from the US playbook. They can't come up with anything creative at all. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessio ... ic_Hit_Man

I do not think the world, or even Chinese people, will tolerate China being the sole world power. You're going to see a fight!
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