Rural speak

Have questions or resources regarding Khmer Culture? This forum is all about the Kingdom of Cambodia's culture. Khmer language, Cambodian weddings, French influence, Cambodian architecture, Cambodian politics, Khmer customs, etc? This is the place. Living in Cambodia can cause you to experience a whole new level of culture shock, so feel free to talk about all things related to the Khmer people, and their traditions. And if you want something in Khmer script translated into English, you will probably find what you need.
taabarang
Expatriate
Posts: 3727
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 7:49 am
Reputation: 886
Location: Outside of Kampong Cham city
United States of America

Re: Rural speak

Post by taabarang » Sat May 13, 2017 12:15 pm

"BKL, I doubt it would be necessary to say 'somto' when addressing a kid."

I can't make a definite call on this. Under the circumstances it would be acceptable but it doesn't sound like"real" Cambodian to me. But it is certainly understandable and causes no harm.

However it is certainly not wrong to use it with kids under other circumstances.
As my old Cajun bait seller used to say, "I opes you luck.
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13715
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1911
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: Rural speak

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sat May 13, 2017 12:22 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 10:47 am

The key word here is junghaan (ចង្ហាន់) which means food or money. It's specifically for monks, I assume kind of like the word "chaan" for eating, so they understand. I don't have a dictionary near me, so asked her if the word means "food" (and then was extended to money as well), or if it's the Khmer equivalent of the English word "alms". She said food and money. I'm a bit curious about this so maybe Jamie can check his dictionary for us.

Anyways, that's the correct thing to say. Like I said, we can usually get the message across in a sometimes crude way which isn't always appropriate, haha. I took years before some people corrected things I'd been saying since I learned Khmer. Anyways, ask your wife, I would be curious to know what she thinks.
been looking around online to try answer this for you, ចង្ហាន់ from what i can gather its the food offerings given specifically to monks, the meals that get prepared for the monks, im not sure if it includes like the offering of food like rice, bananas and fruit etc you might give when visiting a Wat, but like it could mean both though,
but i not see any connection for it meaning money though, not in dictionaries or google searches anwyay
ImageImageImage


haha yeah i know that, sometimes i get so used to talking with my friends etc that when i start talking to someone new or in certain situations i can come across as being a bit too informal, and sometimes have to apologise lol
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13715
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1911
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: Rural speak

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sat May 13, 2017 12:26 pm

Username Taken wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 11:58 am
BKL, I doubt it would be necessary to say 'somto' when addressing a kid.

Taa, your thoughts?
i think it might be a little different when addressing a "little monk" than when addressing just your average kid, more out of politeness than the social age hierarchy of respect
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
Barang chgout
Expatriate
Posts: 3065
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:36 am
Reputation: 677

Re: Rural speak

Post by Barang chgout » Sat May 13, 2017 1:59 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Barang chgout wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 9:03 pm
You have monks come past your house? Not meaning to be rude but just how rural is rural?

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
We live in Boeung Tompun and we get monks past the house - don't you?
No mate, small town here and although I have NEVER seen the monks asking for alms, it seems most people just take stuff up to the wat.
StroppyChops wrote:
Barang chgout wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 9:03 pm
You have monks come past your house? Not meaning to be rude but just how rural is rural?

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
We live in Boeung Tompun and we get monks past the house - don't you?

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk

Bitte_Kein_Lexus
Expatriate
Posts: 2821
Joined: Sun May 18, 2014 7:32 pm
Reputation: 261

Re: Rural speak

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus » Sat May 13, 2017 2:39 pm

Thanks Jamie. Yeah, I was told it's for food, but implicitly includes money as well as that's what many give now.

Barang chgout, perhaps you live a bit far from the local wat? I don't know of any pagodas where the monks don't do alms. They cover the whole country pretty extensively. Sometimes in the countryside they walk quite a way (except in the rainy season of course). Usually though, the immediate village is enough to sustain the monks. Other people who live further out will go to the pagoda on thngai bun to give food and so on.
Ex Bitteeinbit/LexusSchmexus
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13715
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1911
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: Rural speak

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sat May 13, 2017 3:02 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 2:39 pm
Thanks Jamie. Yeah, I was told it's for food, but implicitly includes money as well as that's what many give now.

Barang chgout, perhaps you live a bit far from the local wat? I don't know of any pagodas where the monks don't do alms. They cover the whole country pretty extensively. Sometimes in the countryside they walk quite a way (except in the rainy season of course). Usually though, the immediate village is enough to sustain the monks. Other people who live further out will go to the pagoda on thngai bun to give food and so on.
yeah i go to Wat Otres often and the offerings to the monks often include a mixture of fruits, tea, milk, sugar, rice etc, incense and candles, plus a small/medium money donation all placed onto a tray, im guessing this is also classed as a ចង្ហាន់ offering, but not everyone includes money, i used to mainly give money, but now im more inclined to buy all the stuff
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10598
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1015
Australia

Re: Rural speak

Post by StroppyChops » Sat May 13, 2017 3:04 pm

Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 12:26 pm
Username Taken wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 11:58 am
BKL, I doubt it would be necessary to say 'somto' when addressing a kid.

Taa, your thoughts?
i think it might be a little different when addressing a "little monk" than when addressing just your average kid, more out of politeness than the social age hierarchy of respect
A short story...

Our previous business manager was driving us in the country for a daytrip with his family, and pointed out some junior monks doing the rounds. He said, "Look, little monks."

I immediately responded with, "yeah, monklings." He looked at me blankly and asked me to repeat myself, which I did, and then he lapsed into silent thought.

A little later he asked, "Why you say like that? Monklings?"

I said, "Well, you know how baby ducks are ducklings? So, little monks are monklings." He agreed, and for the next 15 minutes I heard him practicing "monklings" under his breath.

I couldn't stick with it and eventually told him I was joking, but he didn't see the humour.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13715
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1911
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: Rural speak

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sat May 13, 2017 4:08 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 3:04 pm
Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 12:26 pm
Username Taken wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 11:58 am
BKL, I doubt it would be necessary to say 'somto' when addressing a kid.

Taa, your thoughts?
i think it might be a little different when addressing a "little monk" than when addressing just your average kid, more out of politeness than the social age hierarchy of respect
A short story...

Our previous business manager was driving us in the country for a daytrip with his family, and pointed out some junior monks doing the rounds. He said, "Look, little monks."

I immediately responded with, "yeah, monklings." He looked at me blankly and asked me to repeat myself, which I did, and then he lapsed into silent thought.

A little later he asked, "Why you say like that? Monklings?"

I said, "Well, you know how baby ducks are ducklings? So, little monks are monklings." He agreed, and for the next 15 minutes I heard him practicing "monklings" under his breath.

I couldn't stick with it and eventually told him I was joking, but he didn't see the humour.
haha i love the term "little monks"
i first heard it on this story... https://cambodiaexpatsonline.com/newswor ... t6946.html
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
Barang chgout
Expatriate
Posts: 3065
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:36 am
Reputation: 677

Re: Rural speak

Post by Barang chgout » Sun May 14, 2017 9:05 am

100 m to the wat. OSom.

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk

Barang chgout
Expatriate
Posts: 3065
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:36 am
Reputation: 677

Re: Rural speak

Post by Barang chgout » Sun May 14, 2017 9:06 am

OSaom (Damn auto correct)

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 39 guests