Help translating an idiom

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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by taabarang » Fri Jan 13, 2017 6:46 pm

Yep, you nailed it thelost. Her father was Chinese. However it's a small village and I have no desire to alienate her. Plus she treats my kids just as well as she treats her "pure" grandkids of my wife's younger sister. She's basically a good woman paying lip service to a dead tradition that hasn't heard of globalization.
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by thelost » Sat Jan 14, 2017 6:01 am

i just figured it out that maiyeh means grandmother? me yeay? as in she's the mother of your wife?

honestly, in thailand as birthplace your children would have been accepted as thai more easier than being in cambodia as khmer. even the thais know your children is look krueng / mixed child.

i went to thailand and i'm treated as a thai, they even spoke to me in thai and i am not even born in thailand. when i go to cambodia, they'll think i am taiwanese, thai, chinese, japanese, vietnamese, whatever?

your children have every right to be khmer. i dont know, it's the society and khmers are kind of...wow, is it like a special exclusive club or what?
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by LeesaJohnson » Wed Mar 22, 2017 4:38 pm

Translation for the sentence. "look at me right/directly in the face."
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by Username Taken » Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:59 pm

^^ Nice cut n paste from Jamies post > > > https://cambodiaexpatsonline.com/cambodi ... ml#p157703
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by juansweetpotato » Wed Mar 22, 2017 11:22 pm

thelost wrote:
Sat Jan 14, 2017 6:01 am
i just figured it out that maiyeh means grandmother? me yeay? as in she's the mother of your wife?

honestly, in thailand as birthplace your children would have been accepted as thai more easier than being in cambodia as khmer. even the thais know your children is look krueng / mixed child.

i went to thailand and i'm treated as a thai, they even spoke to me in thai and i am not even born in thailand. when i go to cambodia, they'll think i am taiwanese, thai, chinese, japanese, vietnamese, whatever?

your children have every right to be khmer. i dont know, it's the society and khmers are kind of...wow, is it like a special exclusive club or what?
Good chat between you two. I was going to mention the sino-Khmer thing just before you did. On closer inspection, quite a lot of people here believe that only the Khmer are Cambodians. They believe it's to do with a direct bloodline to Angkor. The other tribes aren't recognized as being Cambodian even though some of them have been here longer than the Khmer.
My ex was Basque, and I see a lot of similarities as far as being pure this or that.
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:09 pm

Username Taken wrote:
Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:59 pm
^^ Nice cut n paste from Jamies post > > > https://cambodiaexpatsonline.com/cambodi ... ml#p157703
:roll: :wink:
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by taabarang » Sat Mar 25, 2017 4:41 pm

Guys, thanks for the great replies. Translating idioms is somewhat of a crapshoot. It's generally difficult or very very easy. An example of the latter would be the Khmer expression,"to look at someone or something like a water buffalo looking at television." which compares rather nicely with the French, " regarder quequechose ou quelqu'un comme le vache regarde passer le train." Both capture the slack jawed expression of total stupefaction.

The idiom under discussion however is of the first kind. I've no quarrel with the translations on a one to one basis. However since we come from countries of democratic origins those renderings such as, "Do you know who I am?" while not unheard-of strike me as extremely crude, perhaps something that a buffoon like Donald Trump would ejaculate. So, I think a reversal is in order to wit, "Who the. Hell do you think you are?". True the nuances get lost but the social context is more to form. Works for me anyway. Feedback please.
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by timmydownawell » Sun Apr 16, 2017 3:20 pm

My friend in Australia has posed this question, maybe you guys can help. She writes:

"There's an expression in Khmer pronounced PlerPlern (I think). It literally translates as flickering lights but it described the excitement of people from the province when they see modern things they've never seen before. Can you see if you can kind out more about it and get the correct pronunciation and it written in Khmer?"


I'm guessing from my useless EN-KH dictionary it might be "Pleu Plerng" - but I could be completely wrong.

I assume it might be like the way we'd say in English that someone's face "lights up" when they are excited or delighted?

Any idea what the actual term is and how it's written in Khmer? Thanks.

EDIT: just to add she now tells me the term is used in a negative sense, as a put-down.
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by taabarang » Sun Apr 16, 2017 7:04 pm

TDAW wrote, "My friend in Australia has posed this question, maybe you guys can help. She writes:

"There's an expression in Khmer pronounced PlerPlern (I think). It literally translates as flickering lights but it described the excitement of people from the province when they see modern things they've never seen before. Can you see if you can kind out more about it and get the correct pronunciation and it written in Khmer?"

First things first. No I can't write it in Khmer because I am illiterate in that language. Secondly, after conferring with my wife about this supposed idiom there are other possibilities. My wife, who is pretty astute in Khmer language matters, said that no such idiom is in use. So the other possibilities are 1) that it is an overseas neologism from the Khmer diaspora or your friend heard wrong. Assuming the latter my wife suggested it might be " stoeu pleung" which in cooking means not enough flame or idiomatically
" insufficient experience". The latter could apply handily to the situation you described. In which case I would render the idiom as "overwhelmed", or "dazzled by the big city lights".

I may of course be wrong but until your friend conveys the Khmer script first, it's anybody's guess.

EDIT: So, even if my best guess sucks hind tit
, you've got a new valid idiom at your disposal.
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Re: Help translating an idiom

Post by timmydownawell » Sun Apr 16, 2017 7:18 pm

taabarang wrote:
Sun Apr 16, 2017 7:04 pm
Assuming the latter my wife suggested it might be " stoeu pleung" which in cooking means not enough flame or idiomatically
" insufficient experience". The latter could apply handily to the situation you described. In which case I would render the idiom as "overwhelmed", or "dazzled by the big city lights".
Not enough flame could translate as "not very bright", perhaps?
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