Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

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Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by CEOCambodiaNews » Fri Sep 09, 2016 1:02 pm

Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Fri, 9 September 2016
Yesenia Amaro
When the Ministry of Education in 2014 introduced its strict “no cheating” policy for school leavers, many of those who had cheated their way through in previous years surely breathed a sigh of relief.

That’s because anyone wishing to enter university must pass their Grade 12 exit exam. The 2013 pass rate was nearly 90 per cent, another year of seemingly stellar results. But with measures in place to prevent rampant cheating in 2014, just 25 per cent of the 90,000-odd school-leavers passed (though that number increased to about 37 per cent after students were permitted to retake the exam).

Clearly, many of those accepted to a tertiary education course in 2013 wouldn’t have been admitted had they been born a year later.

The ministry has been applauded for its tough stance; after all, there’s little point in an education system in which you can cheat your way to top grades.

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full-story.......http://www.phnompenhpost.com/post-weeke ... t-cheating
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by Anchor Moy » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:01 pm

Wow, that's quite an article on Cambodia's university system by the Phnom Penh Post.
The problem is that, although getting into university is harder, getting through university hasn’t changed much at all. Once you’re in – depending on the institution – the chances to cheat are as widespread as ever. And that means at least some of the 250,000 students in higher education don’t have to learn in order to graduate.
It's not surprising that there is so little faith in doctors and dentists. I hate to even think about the architecture and engineering students.
A recent UHS dental graduate, who asked to remain anonymous because he doesn’t want to jeopardise his new job, says cheating was “rampant” throughout his courses and during tests. And even though examinations were computerised two years ago to help prevent cheating, some lecturers still provided students with a list of questions they knew would be asked.

And, he adds, some students who didn’t speak English – one of the three languages of instruction at the dental school – still managed to pass, as did others who rarely showed up to class.
But, students cheat because they can get away with it, and sometimes they are assisted by certain lecturers - the cheating starts there. Also, the lack of accountability of private institutions means that degrees are often sold, not earned. If you pay enough money then you are considered to have "earned" your degree. The student is happy, the school is happy, so why are people complaining ? :facepalm:
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus » Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:20 pm

I was actually having a conversation about this the other day with two Khmers over some BBQ. They were angry because apparently Zaman University had posted a job opening but requested that the candidate had MA from a foreign university. This had been doing the rounds on Facebook. Now I understand how this was a faux pas on Zaman's part, and maybe even be illegal in several western countries. They should have kept it to themselves and simply gone through applicants until they found some who had foreign MAs and selected the best candidate for the job. However, what's funny is that the two Khmers were angry because it meant that a Khmer MA wasn't good enough. They were somehow offended by it, saying: "What?! A Khmer degree isn't good enough?!" and stuff like that, completely missing the point and the bigger picture it reveals regarding Cambodia's lackluster education system. I tried to politely explain that employers seek out the best, and as such, wanted to weed out capable employees. I know it's easy to brand someone who "looks down on Khmers", so I asked them why employers might post job openings like that? What did it say about the trust they had in the education system? If an institution is known to pass anyone going through it's doors with a bit of money, then will people take the degree seriously? Now what if it's not just one or two institutions, but the vast majority of them, or the entire education system? his article is yet another perfect example of this. It's no secret: everyone knows people cheat their way through highschool and even in universities, it's rampant. I've seen university material myself and in many cases, it's the equivalent of high school stuff. As an employer, would you want to take the risk and hire someone who knows absolutely nothing? Or who knows 10% of what they're supposed to know? I know I wouldn't, I'd be willing to pay a bit extra for someone who I know for sure actually earned their degree. Maybe you didn't cheat, but the degree is seen as worthless if 80% of the graduates do cheat, or are allowed to cheat. This inconvenient truth is slowly dawning on most Cambodians. What happens when ASEAN integrates further? Who will get the top jobs? The Globe did an interesting article regarding Education Funding in ASEAN, and unsurprisingly, Cambodia was at the very bottom, even lower than Laos! Luckily, things are slowly changing and a number of good private schools have emerged and the public sector is also reforming.
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Re: RE: Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by General Mackevili » Sat Sep 10, 2016 8:20 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:Maybe you didn't cheat, but the degree is seen as worthless if 80% of the graduates do cheat, or are allowed to cheat. This inconvenient truth is slowly dawning on most Cambodians. What happens when ASEAN integrates further? Who will get the top jobs? The Globe did an interesting article regarding Education Funding in ASEAN, and unsurprisingly, Cambodia was at the very bottom, even lower than Laos! Luckily, things are slowly changing and a number of good private schools have emerged and the public sector is also reforming.
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by Duncan » Sat Sep 10, 2016 8:24 pm

I've never heard of a Tuk-Tuk Diploma .
Cambodia,,,, Don't fall in love with her.
Like the spoilt child she is, she will not be happy till she destroys herself from within and breaks your heart.
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by Anchor Moy » Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:03 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:I was actually having a conversation about this the other day with two Khmers over some BBQ. They were angry because apparently Zaman University had posted a job opening but requested that the candidate had MA from a foreign university. This had been doing the rounds on Facebook. Now I understand how this was a faux pas on Zaman's part, and maybe even be illegal in several western countries. They should have kept it to themselves and simply gone through applicants until they found some who had foreign MAs and selected the best candidate for the job. However, what's funny is that the two Khmers were angry because it meant that a Khmer MA wasn't good enough. They were somehow offended by it, saying: "What?! A Khmer degree isn't good enough?!" and stuff like that, completely missing the point and the bigger picture it reveals regarding Cambodia's lackluster education system. I tried to politely explain that employers seek out the best, and as such, wanted to weed out capable employees. I know it's easy to brand someone who "looks down on Khmers", so I asked them why employers might post job openings like that? What did it say about the trust they had in the education system? If an institution is known to pass anyone going through it's doors with a bit of money, then will people take the degree seriously? Now what if it's not just one or two institutions, but the vast majority of them, or the entire education system? his article is yet another perfect example of this. It's no secret: everyone knows people cheat their way through highschool and even in universities, it's rampant. I've seen university material myself and in many cases, it's the equivalent of high school stuff. As an employer, would you want to take the risk and hire someone who knows absolutely nothing? Or who knows 10% of what they're supposed to know? I know I wouldn't, I'd be willing to pay a bit extra for someone who I know for sure actually earned their degree. Maybe you didn't cheat, but the degree is seen as worthless if 80% of the graduates do cheat, or are allowed to cheat. This inconvenient truth is slowly dawning on most Cambodians. What happens when ASEAN integrates further? Who will get the top jobs? The Globe did an interesting article regarding Education Funding in ASEAN, and unsurprisingly, Cambodia was at the very bottom, even lower than Laos! Luckily, things are slowly changing and a number of good private schools have emerged and the public sector is also reforming.
Yes,yes and yes, about missing the point that a degree is a validation of knowledge. In Cambodia a degree is often seen as no more than a step up the social ladder, and who cares if you worked or just paid for it. :facepalm:
I've had these conversations: Why do you think you want to go to university ? To get a degree. Why do you think you need a degree for your present work ? I will be more intelligent if I have a degree.
Note that it is the degree itself which is expected to confer knowledge.
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by Samouth » Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:54 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:I was actually having a conversation about this the other day with two Khmers over some BBQ. They were angry because apparently Zaman University had posted a job opening but requested that the candidate had MA from a foreign university. This had been doing the rounds on Facebook. Now I understand how this was a faux pas on Zaman's part, and maybe even be illegal in several western countries. They should have kept it to themselves and simply gone through applicants until they found some who had foreign MAs and selected the best candidate for the job. However, what's funny is that the two Khmers were angry because it meant that a Khmer MA wasn't good enough. They were somehow offended by it, saying: "What?! A Khmer degree isn't good enough?!" and stuff like that, completely missing the point and the bigger picture it reveals regarding Cambodia's lackluster education system. I tried to politely explain that employers seek out the best, and as such, wanted to weed out capable employees. I know it's easy to brand someone who "looks down on Khmers", so I asked them why employers might post job openings like that? What did it say about the trust they had in the education system? If an institution is known to pass anyone going through it's doors with a bit of money, then will people take the degree seriously? Now what if it's not just one or two institutions, but the vast majority of them, or the entire education system? his article is yet another perfect example of this. It's no secret: everyone knows people cheat their way through highschool and even in universities, it's rampant. I've seen university material myself and in many cases, it's the equivalent of high school stuff. As an employer, would you want to take the risk and hire someone who knows absolutely nothing? Or who knows 10% of what they're supposed to know? I know I wouldn't, I'd be willing to pay a bit extra for someone who I know for sure actually earned their degree. Maybe you didn't cheat, but the degree is seen as worthless if 80% of the graduates do cheat, or are allowed to cheat. This inconvenient truth is slowly dawning on most Cambodians. What happens when ASEAN integrates further? Who will get the top jobs? The Globe did an interesting article regarding Education Funding in ASEAN, and unsurprisingly, Cambodia was at the very bottom, even lower than Laos! Luckily, things are slowly changing and a number of good private schools have emerged and the public sector is also reforming.
Wow it is great that you managed to discuss with Cambodians over this issue. I think everyone know that the education system in Cambodia is not good that's why it is not even regionally recognized.

Actually I have read the job announcement that posted by Zaman School. I am kinda agree with the point, however I feel that the announcement was discriminated to everyone who got their education or degree in Cambodia. As you said, the school shouldn't have put this part in its job requirement. Just don't take any applicants who got their master degree in Cambodia and wait until someone is qualified apply for the job.

I think the school itself was making a mistake that could be negatively resulted or influenced on its students as well. Even though the one who has master degree from Zaman still can't apply for the job there, because they are not different from other Cambodians considering that fact that Zaman is also located in Cambodia.

Some English schools in Cambodia have their own school preferences. I have seen some English teacher job announcement that the school clearly stated that they prefer applicants who graduated from such as IFL, Norton University, Human Resources University, University of Cambodia and PUC. This doesn't seem a big deal for me compare to the one from Zaman.
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by bolueeleh » Sat Sep 10, 2016 10:46 pm

like i said before i have resume thats says fluent in english, degree in accounting

i asked them what is earning before tax and interest? they answer : me no understand, why awning must sex?
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by willyhilly » Sun Sep 11, 2016 11:36 am

Engineers are well taught by people who were trained in the eastern bloc. But they are not wanted because they interfere with cutting corners and making profits.
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Re: Degrees of difficulty – the cost of cheating

Post by Anchor Moy » Sun Sep 11, 2016 3:01 pm

Phnom Penh Post: Quote of the Day.
" You don’t want to employ an engineering graduate who will design and build a building that can fall down."
UNESCO higher education section chief Peter Wells, on the societal implications of widespread cheating in Cambodia's universities
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/


Give this man a cookie. :salut:
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