Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

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Anty
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by Anty »

ExPenhMan wrote: Fri Apr 17, 2020 1:45 pm ^^^ Apparently, making an effective vaccine for COVID19 will not be an easy task. It's not just about harnessing antibodies, it's about harnessing the right kind of antibodies, called neutralizing antibodies.

Good shortish story in the Scientific American last week, What Immunity to COVID-19 Really Means.
Immunity to seasonal coronaviruses (such as those that cause common colds), for example, starts declining a couple of weeks after infection. And within a year, some people are vulnerable to reinfection. That observation is disconcerting when experts say it is unlikely we will have a vaccine for COVID-19 within 18 months. But studies of SARS-CoV—the virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, which shares a considerable amount of its genetic material with SARS-CoV-2—are more promising. Antibody testing shows SARS-CoV immunity peaks at around four months and offers protection for roughly two to three years. As Preeti Malani, chief health officer and a professor of medicine at the University of Michigan, said in a video interview with JAMA Editor in Chief Howard Bauchner,this period presents “a pretty good time line for thinking about vaccines and therapeutics” for COVID-19.

Even if the antibodies stick around in the body, however, it is not yet certain that they will prevent future infection. What we want, says [Dawn Bowdish, a professor of pathology and molecular medicine and Canada Research Chair in Aging and Immunity at McMaster University in Ontario] are neutralizing antibodies. These are the proteins that reduce and prevent infection by binding to the part of a virus that connects to and “unlocks” host cells. They are relatively easy to detect, and they are far easier for vaccine developers to generate than the alternative: the immune system’s T cells. In contrast, nonneutralizing antibodies still recognize parts of the pathogen, but they do not bind effectively and so do not prevent it from invading cells.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... lly-means/
There are vaccines for canine and feline corona viruses. I wonder how a human variant is different? I mean they are different viruses yes but all Corona virus.
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phuketrichard
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by phuketrichard »

Just spoke with my daughter who works as a vet tech in a veterinarian hospital in Northern Ca.
we spoke about this today
so far NO domestic pet has gotten the virus and no person who has come in contact with animals has caught the virus


Even last month the were saying a vaccine would take 12-18 months to be developed
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by John Bingham »

Anty wrote: Fri Apr 17, 2020 4:47 pm
There are vaccines for canine and feline corona viruses. I wonder how a human variant is different? I mean they are different viruses yes but all Corona virus.
Likely very different. For example Aspirin or chocolate can kill cats.
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by siliconlife »

The #nnevvy war - Chinese nationalists/bots have attacked Thai society on Twitter, lost the fight, and drawn the ire of the whole online community of the Asia-Pacific region.

Moved to Thai subforum: thailand-news-and-discussion/the-nnevy- ... 37518.html
Last edited by siliconlife on Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by Electric Earth »

^ That's funny. I'm not quite sure about it being in the covid thread, but it's funny. It would fit well in the Thailand subforum too.
Do you think the parents of baby boomers whined so much when the boomers started changing society? And yet the whiney ones like to call young people "snowflakes." Hmm...
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by siliconlife »

Electric Earth wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:53 am ^ That's funny. I'm not quite sure about it being in the covid thread, but it's funny. It would fit well in the Thailand subforum too.
True, I just kind of put it here because of all this coronavirus related xenophobia/racism going on, but it's probably better off in the Thai subf, as the virus isn't actually mentioned.
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

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Latest figures from Germany - 30mns ago.
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Germany’s confirmed coronavirus cases have risen by 3,609 to 137,439, data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases showed on Saturday, marking a fourth straight day of a spike in new infections.

The death toll has risen by 242 to 4,110, the tally showed.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-heal ... 2008J?il=0
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

Post by Clemen »

"There's little sign of herd immunity, WHO says

Research suggests herd immunity in the broader population is not occurring on a large scale.(Reuters: Kim Kyung-Hoon)
The World Health Organisation is not sure whether the presence of antibodies in blood gives full protection against reinfection with the new coronavirus, the group's top emergencies expert Mike Ryan has said.

Dr Ryan also said that even if antibodies were effective there was little sign that large numbers of people had developed them and were beginning to offer so-called "herd immunity" to the broader population.

"A lot of preliminary information coming to us right now would suggest quite a low percentage of population have seroconverted (to produce antibodies)," he said.

"The expectation that … the majority in society may have developed antibodies, the general evidence is pointing against that, so it may not solve the problem of governments."
TL;dr don't get your hopes up
up to you...
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Re: Following the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak - News and Discussion

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Clemen wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 4:02 pm "There's little sign of herd immunity, WHO says

Research suggests herd immunity in the broader population is not occurring on a large scale.(Reuters: Kim Kyung-Hoon)
The World Health Organisation is not sure whether the presence of antibodies in blood gives full protection against reinfection with the new coronavirus, the group's top emergencies expert Mike Ryan has said.

Dr Ryan also said that even if antibodies were effective there was little sign that large numbers of people had developed them and were beginning to offer so-called "herd immunity" to the broader population.

"A lot of preliminary information coming to us right now would suggest quite a low percentage of population have seroconverted (to produce antibodies)," he said.

"The expectation that … the majority in society may have developed antibodies, the general evidence is pointing against that, so it may not solve the problem of governments."
TL;dr don't get your hopes up
Can anyone here explain to me why so many experts seem to believe that catching this virus, and recovering, will not necessarily create immunity, or that it could be very short lived, while at the same time assuming that a vaccine should be an effective, sustainable solution?
Doesn’t a vaccine essentially mimic a light infection of the disease, so that the body naturally builds immunity?
We have vaccines for the seasonal flu. They are not particularly effective (I’ve read around 60%), and need to be modified continuously as the target virus mutates. Tens of thousands die every year, despite flu shots being cheap, and readily available in developed countries.

What happens if, after we’ve hid inside our houses for 6, 12, 18 months, or whatever it takes to develop a vaccine, we realize that it only works 60% of the time, and only lasts for a few months before needing to be administered again?

If 60% effectiveness could be enough to build an effective level of herd immunity, then why is allowing herd immunity to build naturally among young, healthy people, while keeping those at high risk isolated, criticized as such a dangerous strategy?

Is it realistic to think that the world can afford the development, manufacture, and distribution of a necessary number of doses, while the rest of the economy sits on hold, or possibly crashes into the ground?
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