Composting

Provincial living: homesteading, farming, gardening, self-efficiency and animal husbandry.
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giblet
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Re: Composting

Postby giblet » Sat Oct 11, 2014 7:53 pm

Username Taken wrote:Good of you to come back with the update.

Read the book!
I'll admit that I had you in mind. I'll work on getting through the book; today I looked at the pictures. I also got a book about soil. At least if I come down with insomnia I'll have a backup plan.
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Re: Composting

Postby Username Taken » Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:22 pm

giblet wrote:
Username Taken wrote:Good of you to come back with the update.

Read the book!
I'll admit that I had you in mind. I'll work on getting through the book; today I looked at the pictures. I also got a book about soil. At least if I come down with insomnia I'll have a backup plan.
Stop it, you're making me blush :oops:
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

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StroppyChops
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Re: Composting

Postby StroppyChops » Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:54 pm

giblet wrote:I got a book on composting which I don't expect to read...
Shred it in a blender and add it to the pile.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
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bolueeleh
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Re: Composting

Postby bolueeleh » Sun Aug 28, 2016 10:52 am

thanks UT for bringing me to this thread, recently i bot a small plot of and near SHV, i started composting n maggot farming, but to no success, the compost got too wet due to raining season, and my chickens died after eating maggots from fish scraps i took from the market,

so now i am looking to build a proper maggot farm, that i can harvest the maggots daily, cook it, dry it, maybe ground it up into powder and feed to my chickens or pigs

now i only have a small plot of land 40 by 50m, i hope to do all my experimentations on this small plot of land and move to a bigger plot of land later, hopefully i can hv a fully self sustainable farm with methane digesters, solar panels, waste water management system, small bio diesel plant, water distillation.

if anyone have any ideas or experience please contact me, we can work something out, thanks
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frank lee bent
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Re: Composting

Postby frank lee bent » Sun Aug 28, 2016 3:32 pm

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Mr Curious
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Re: Composting

Postby Mr Curious » Thu Sep 01, 2016 2:32 pm

believe it or not pigs will happily eat banana tree trunks. Friend in Thailand does this, has a motorized chopper/shredder and then mixes some rock salt and brown sugar into the mush and puts it in a barrel with cover for a week or so. Oinkers chow down on the stuff. Ducks also peck away at a trunk just tossed on the ground. Also they love that floating vegetation from the other ponds. They ate any that was in theirs :)
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bolueeleh
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Re: Composting

Postby bolueeleh » Thu Sep 01, 2016 11:21 pm

so it became fermented banana tree trunk :thumb:
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TristranandIsolde
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Re: Composting

Postby TristranandIsolde » Fri Sep 02, 2016 3:10 pm

So do you have the contact for the $15/kg. work seller? What kind of worms are they?

Canadian Nightcrawler: Lumbricus Terrestris
Red Wiggler: Eisenia Fetida
European Nightcrawler: Eisenia Hortensis
African Nightcrawler: Eudrilus Eugeniae
Red Tiger: Eisenia Andrei
Lubricus Rubellus

Worms are an excellent addition, they are almost like "the bees of the earth" - they don't pollinate, but they aerate the soil to enable deeper and more branched root structures - hence a healthier plant.

Also provide an excellent natural fertilizer. Great for fishing, too.


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