Mushrooms

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Stravaiger
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Stravaiger »

Doc67 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 1:20 pm
Stravaiger wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 11:43 am If it's purely decorative I'd suggest the small brown capped ones with the long stalks (optionally discard) available in most supermarkets, $1 a punnet.

I've never seen mushrooms in bolognese but it could work. For extra flavour a little minced chicken liver or bacon can be good.
That what I have used, I found some at Kandal market. They'll do the job, they are not intrinsic.

As for authenticity, it is probably a long way from the basic thin sauce for covering pasta. It does start with a slowly sweated soffritto (but with garlic), browned beef mince with a few slices of chopped fatty bacon, beef stock, red wine, tinned toms and tom paste, and a few mushrooms. Salt, pepper, a good splash of Lea & Perrins, mixed herbs and patience.

The remaining half bottle of red wine helps pass the time...

Edit: For another twist, add a can of Cannellini beans at the end - they can catch on the bottom of the pan very easily. They soak up the sauce and add body. Probably would make Italians weep.
I rarely aim for authentic. Most of my cooking is stripped and simplified.

The addition of beans would make a hearty dish, maybe use short pasta. I think we tend to make heavier pasta sauces when serving them as a main course, hence 'inauthentic'. I suspect the first waves of Italian immigrants who opened restaurants were responsible for this, focusing on pasta as something quintessentially Italian and also a cheap filler, e.g. spaghetti and meatballs in the US.

A mix of pork and beef can be good too.
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Doc67
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Doc67 »

Spigzy wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 2:11 pm
WildAlaskaKen wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 1:42 pm
Doc67 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 1:20 pm
Stravaiger wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 11:43 am bada bing
Weep ?The boys in the Social Clubs back in the old days in the states would murder you over that recipe
and in Sicily he'd be joining a 'retirement community'..

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Doc67
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Doc67 »

Stravaiger wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 8:57 am
Doc67 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 1:20 pm
Stravaiger wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 11:43 am If it's purely decorative I'd suggest the small brown capped ones with the long stalks (optionally discard) available in most supermarkets, $1 a punnet.

I've never seen mushrooms in bolognese but it could work. For extra flavour a little minced chicken liver or bacon can be good.
That what I have used, I found some at Kandal market. They'll do the job, they are not intrinsic.

As for authenticity, it is probably a long way from the basic thin sauce for covering pasta. It does start with a slowly sweated soffritto (but with garlic), browned beef mince with a few slices of chopped fatty bacon, beef stock, red wine, tinned toms and tom paste, and a few mushrooms. Salt, pepper, a good splash of Lea & Perrins, mixed herbs and patience.

The remaining half bottle of red wine helps pass the time...

Edit: For another twist, add a can of Cannellini beans at the end - they can catch on the bottom of the pan very easily. They soak up the sauce and add body. Probably would make Italians weep.
I rarely aim for authentic. Most of my cooking is stripped and simplified.

The addition of beans would make a hearty dish, maybe use short pasta. I think we tend to make heavier pasta sauces when serving them as a main course, hence 'inauthentic'. I suspect the first waves of Italian immigrants who opened restaurants were responsible for this, focusing on pasta as something quintessentially Italian and also a cheap filler, e.g. spaghetti and meatballs in the US.

A mix of pork and beef can be good too.
Agreed; I have made meatballs with beef, pork and veal mince(good luck with finding that in PP). The browning of them is a pain in the ass though and makes a right fat-splash mess. Loose mince is much easier to handle.

It came out well, but a few hearty mushrooms would have been nice. The flavour is deep and, of course, the overnight stay in the fridge worked its magic. WHY do such foods improve with a night in the fridge? It is one of life's happy mysteries.

My next mission is Indian spicy lamb sheesh kebabs and I intend to put a few in some puffy pastry and bake them. I shall name them Punjabi sausage rolls. I am not joking! I shall report back in due course.

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Stravaiger
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Stravaiger »

Doc67 wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 11:37 am My next mission is Indian spicy lamb sheesh kebabs and I intend to put a few in some puffy pastry and bake them. I shall name them Punjabi sausage rolls. I am not joking! I shall report back in due course.
Has anyone tried the Pie Kitchen ?

Image
• Pork pies available from $4, with a pot of
Coleman’s mustard (.25¢).
• Sausages, British Banger & Cumberland
1/2 kg for $6, 1kg for $11.
• Keema Beef Pasties, $4, available on Friday.
🛵 Delivery or collection, close to Street 172/19.
https://www.facebook.com/p/The-Pie-Kitc ... 189402339/
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Spigzy
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Spigzy »

Doc67 wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 11:37 am My next mission is Indian spicy lamb sheesh kebabs and I intend to put a few in some puffy pastry and bake them. I shall name them Punjabi sausage rolls. I am not joking! I shall report back in due course.
:good: cracking idea.
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Marx
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Marx »

Doc67 wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 11:37 am
Stravaiger wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 8:57 am
Doc67 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 1:20 pm
Stravaiger wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 11:43 am If it's purely decorative I'd suggest the small brown capped ones with the long stalks (optionally discard) available in most supermarkets, $1 a punnet.

I've never seen mushrooms in bolognese but it could work. For extra flavour a little minced chicken liver or bacon can be good.
That what I have used, I found some at Kandal market. They'll do the job, they are not intrinsic.

As for authenticity, it is probably a long way from the basic thin sauce for covering pasta. It does start with a slowly sweated soffritto (but with garlic), browned beef mince with a few slices of chopped fatty bacon, beef stock, red wine, tinned toms and tom paste, and a few mushrooms. Salt, pepper, a good splash of Lea & Perrins, mixed herbs and patience.

The remaining half bottle of red wine helps pass the time...

Edit: For another twist, add a can of Cannellini beans at the end - they can catch on the bottom of the pan very easily. They soak up the sauce and add body. Probably would make Italians weep.
I rarely aim for authentic. Most of my cooking is stripped and simplified.

The addition of beans would make a hearty dish, maybe use short pasta. I think we tend to make heavier pasta sauces when serving them as a main course, hence 'inauthentic'. I suspect the first waves of Italian immigrants who opened restaurants were responsible for this, focusing on pasta as something quintessentially Italian and also a cheap filler, e.g. spaghetti and meatballs in the US.

A mix of pork and beef can be good too.
Agreed; I have made meatballs with beef, pork and veal mince(good luck with finding that in PP). The browning of them is a pain in the ass though and makes a right fat-splash mess. Loose mince is much easier to handle.

It came out well, but a few hearty mushrooms would have been nice. The flavour is deep and, of course, the overnight stay in the fridge worked its magic. WHY do such foods improve with a night in the fridge? It is one of life's happy mysteries.

My next mission is Indian spicy lamb sheesh kebabs and I intend to put a few in some puffy pastry and bake them. I shall name them Punjabi sausage rolls. I am not joking! I shall report back in due course.

Image
That really doesn’t look any better than Mateo‘s uploads that you were so rude about. Each of the ingredients in your pictured stew has a character and a soul that can take centre stage, instead of being forced into playing supporting roles for other supporting roles. The genius of Italian cooking has always been in promoting the humble to the sublime. The same in China, taken to a godly level. There’s a big difference between that, and using up everything that’s been left sitting in the fridge.
Revolutions have all shown that many things can be changed, with the exception of people themselves.
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John Bingham
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by John Bingham »

Stravaiger wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 2:47 pm
Has anyone tried the Pie Kitchen ?

Image
• Pork pies available from $4, with a pot of
Coleman’s mustard (.25¢).
• Sausages, British Banger & Cumberland
1/2 kg for $6, 1kg for $11.
• Keema Beef Pasties, $4, available on Friday.
🛵 Delivery or collection, close to Street 172/19.
https://www.facebook.com/p/The-Pie-Kitc ... 189402339/
I haven't tried them but attempted to buy some stuff off them a couple of months back before they had things sorted out. I am looking forward to checking out their pork pies, don't think I've ever gotten a proper one here.
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Harold69
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Harold69 »

John Bingham wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 9:27 pm
Stravaiger wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 2:47 pm
Has anyone tried the Pie Kitchen ?

Image
• Pork pies available from $4, with a pot of
Coleman’s mustard (.25¢).
• Sausages, British Banger & Cumberland
1/2 kg for $6, 1kg for $11.
• Keema Beef Pasties, $4, available on Friday.
🛵 Delivery or collection, close to Street 172/19.
https://www.facebook.com/p/The-Pie-Kitc ... 189402339/
I haven't tried them but attempted to buy some stuff off them a couple of months back before they had things sorted out. I am looking forward to checking out their pork pies, don't think I've ever gotten a proper one here.
Yes, highly recommended, though pricey.
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Harold69
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Re: Mushrooms

Post by Harold69 »

Marx wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 8:44 pm
Doc67 wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 11:37 am
Stravaiger wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 8:57 am
Doc67 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 1:20 pm
Stravaiger wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 11:43 am If it's purely decorative I'd suggest the small brown capped ones with the long stalks (optionally discard) available in most supermarkets, $1 a punnet.

I've never seen mushrooms in bolognese but it could work. For extra flavour a little minced chicken liver or bacon can be good.
That what I have used, I found some at Kandal market. They'll do the job, they are not intrinsic.

As for authenticity, it is probably a long way from the basic thin sauce for covering pasta. It does start with a slowly sweated soffritto (but with garlic), browned beef mince with a few slices of chopped fatty bacon, beef stock, red wine, tinned toms and tom paste, and a few mushrooms. Salt, pepper, a good splash of Lea & Perrins, mixed herbs and patience.

The remaining half bottle of red wine helps pass the time...

Edit: For another twist, add a can of Cannellini beans at the end - they can catch on the bottom of the pan very easily. They soak up the sauce and add body. Probably would make Italians weep.
I rarely aim for authentic. Most of my cooking is stripped and simplified.

The addition of beans would make a hearty dish, maybe use short pasta. I think we tend to make heavier pasta sauces when serving them as a main course, hence 'inauthentic'. I suspect the first waves of Italian immigrants who opened restaurants were responsible for this, focusing on pasta as something quintessentially Italian and also a cheap filler, e.g. spaghetti and meatballs in the US.

A mix of pork and beef can be good too.
Agreed; I have made meatballs with beef, pork and veal mince(good luck with finding that in PP). The browning of them is a pain in the ass though and makes a right fat-splash mess. Loose mince is much easier to handle.

It came out well, but a few hearty mushrooms would have been nice. The flavour is deep and, of course, the overnight stay in the fridge worked its magic. WHY do such foods improve with a night in the fridge? It is one of life's happy mysteries.

My next mission is Indian spicy lamb sheesh kebabs and I intend to put a few in some puffy pastry and bake them. I shall name them Punjabi sausage rolls. I am not joking! I shall report back in due course.

Image
That really doesn’t look any better than Mateo‘s uploads that you were so rude about. Each of the ingredients in your pictured stew has a character and a soul that can take centre stage, instead of being forced into playing supporting roles for other supporting roles. The genius of Italian cooking has always been in promoting the humble to the sublime. The same in China, taken to a godly level. There’s a big difference between that, and using up everything that’s been left sitting in the fridge.
Nothing looks as bad as Mateo's uploads.
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