Khmer table manners

This is where our community discusses almost anything! While we're mainly a Cambodia expat discussion forum and talk about expat life here, we debate about almost everything. Even if you're a tourist passing through Southeast Asia and want to connect with expatriates living and working in Cambodia, this is the first section of our site that you should check out. Our members start their own discussions or post links to other blogs and/or news articles they find interesting and want to chat about. So join in the fun and start new topics, or feel free to comment on anything our community members have already started! We also have some Khmer members here as well, but English is the main language used on CEO. You're welcome to have a look around, and if you decide you want to participate, you can become a part our international expat community by signing up for a free account.
User avatar
newkidontheblock
Expatriate
Posts: 3462
Joined: Tue May 20, 2014 3:51 am
Reputation: 1221

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by newkidontheblock »

That fancy dining set up is for British nobility. The kind in Downtown Abbey or some other show.

People went to school (finishing or etiquette school) to learn how to use all that correctly.

I’m with JB, I’d just walk out. Life is way to short to learn a skill I’d never use.

One place set would be enough for a Khmer family to use with left overs to spare.
User avatar
Ghostwriter
Expatriate
Posts: 2296
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:01 am
Reputation: 1491
France

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by Ghostwriter »

xandreu wrote: Fri Sep 23, 2022 2:10 pm I suffer hugely with misophonia - an extreme disliking of certain sounds, and for me, that sound is the sound of other people eating. I'm normally quite a gentle soul who wouldn't say boo to a goose, or whatever the idiom is, but I could quite happily commit murder when it comes to the sound of other people eating. The Khmer culture of deliberatly making the loudest, most unneccessary chomping sounds whilst eating has made me move tables in restaurants many times. It absolutely enrages me like nothing else. I know it's a mental disorder, but I've suffered with it all my life. I cannot bear it. Especially when it's so unneccessary. It's the equivelent of someone putting their face against yours and calling your mother the most vile disgusting names imaginable.

Thankfully, most Khmers I know don't eat like that and eat in the normal way most westerners would, but too many of them don't.
Same here, to the same point. It increased over years, alongside with stress over time i guess.

The top of it was Cambodia, not everybody eats like that, but more than enough i've seen already.
I have to confess that my ears were already very tired from the 15 previous years of industrial machinery noises i've been through. I think that weighted a lot, apart from the natural dislike of such lack of manners at a table.
Paying attention to details for enough time can really worn you out, at some point on some topics, "too much is too much" ^^

Now i take more care of myself ^^, as i feel a bit tired after all theses adventures in
Spoiler:
noisy
asia.
User avatar
newsgatherer
Tourist
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun May 18, 2014 8:22 pm
Reputation: 2
United States of America

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by newsgatherer »

I love chopsticks, I use them all the time. Apparently I don't hold them correctly according to some self-proclaimed scholars I've met on my way. I could imagine that causing some uproar among the more conservative crowd.

Image

:hattip:
User avatar
cautious colin
Expatriate
Posts: 1000
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:47 am
Reputation: 401
Great Britain

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by cautious colin »

newkidontheblock wrote: Fri Sep 23, 2022 10:53 pm That fancy dining set up is for British nobility. The kind in Downtown Abbey or some other show.

People went to school (finishing or etiquette school) to learn how to use all that correctly.

I’m with JB, I’d just walk out. Life is way to short to learn a skill I’d never use.

One place set would be enough for a Khmer family to use with left overs to spare.
For the most part it is just outside in. Not too much to learn.

Fairly unnecessary in most settings (to that extent anyway) but a four/five course setup is not unusual
User avatar
Jerry Atrick
Expatriate
Posts: 3778
Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 4:19 pm
Reputation: 1962
Central African Republic

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by Jerry Atrick »

cautious colin wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 1:33 pm
newkidontheblock wrote: Fri Sep 23, 2022 10:53 pm That fancy dining set up is for British nobility. The kind in Downtown Abbey or some other show.

People went to school (finishing or etiquette school) to learn how to use all that correctly.

I’m with JB, I’d just walk out. Life is way to short to learn a skill I’d never use.

One place set would be enough for a Khmer family to use with left overs to spare.
For the most part it is just outside in. Not too much to learn.

Fairly unnecessary in most settings (to that extent anyway) but a four/five course setup is not unusual
Yeah, it's not very difficult

I served silver service through an agency in a host of higher end London venues for extra cash a long time ago; the most work is in polishing all the fucking utensils before and after service; the serving itself is a piece of piss
User avatar
sigmoid
Expatriate
Posts: 1138
Joined: Fri May 16, 2014 3:53 pm
Reputation: 409
Vietnam

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by sigmoid »

Image

The American way is the best... eating with your hands whilst driving down the highway... the epitome of Freedom
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
I may be going to hell in a bucket,
but at least I'm enjoying the ride.
User avatar
Big Daikon
Expatriate
Posts: 2393
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2019 8:07 am
Reputation: 1919
United States of America

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by Big Daikon »

newsgatherer wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 1:24 pm I love chopsticks, I use them all the time. Apparently I don't hold them correctly according to some self-proclaimed scholars I've met on my way. I could imagine that causing some uproar among the more conservative crowd.

Image

:hattip:
That form looks fine to me. The key is to hold the chopsticks farther away from the food.

Japanese people often often praise my skills in this field.
User avatar
newkidontheblock
Expatriate
Posts: 3462
Joined: Tue May 20, 2014 3:51 am
Reputation: 1221

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by newkidontheblock »

How can one pick up the small, delicate pieces of food when the chopsticks are held so high up?
Chad Sexington
Expatriate
Posts: 986
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 3:43 pm
Reputation: 1263
Great Britain

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by Chad Sexington »

newkidontheblock wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 6:57 pm How can one pick up the small, delicate pieces of food when the chopsticks are held so high up?
I hold them as shown in the photos, and picking up peanuts is no problem.
A sure sign of a chopsticks rookie is gripping them right down near the business ends.
User avatar
Freightdog
Expatriate
Posts: 2571
Joined: Wed May 16, 2018 8:41 am
Reputation: 2086
Location: Attached to a suitcase between realities
Ireland

Re: Khmer table manners

Post by Freightdog »

Chad Sexington wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 7:21 pm
newkidontheblock wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 6:57 pm How can one pick up the small, delicate pieces of food when the chopsticks are held so high up?
I hold them as shown in the photos, and picking up peanuts is no problem.
A sure sign of a chopsticks rookie is gripping them right down near the business ends.
Definitely.
I’ve been using chopsticks since an early age (5-6yrs old) in pretty much the same manner. The only thing I have difficulty with is soup. Seems to be cold by the time I get half way through.
God save the king
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post