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Re: looking forward to this::

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Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 2:15 pm No offense boomers, but every generation says that. I can recognize how they were influential, but their riffs and lyrics are pretty damn simplistic and dare I say, overrated in many ways.
No offense Lexus, but I'd be interested to hear which band of your generation would you consider to be 'the' band that sets them apart from the others of the time? Nirvana? Smashing Pumpkins? RHCP? AC/DC, Queen. Would love to hear your thoughts.

The 'thing' about the Beatles was that they churned out Number 1 hits ones after another, year after year. There were often times when they had several songs concurrently in the Top 10 charts around the world.

They were also accredited with being pioneers.

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Re: looking forward to this::

Post by SternAAlbifrons »

Back then you were either a Rolling Stones man - or a Beatles fan.
(edgy challenging Nat Young, or smiling blonde goodboy Midget Farrelly - the surfing equivs)

I started as one - but ended up on the dark side (of course)
However these days i would say most of the Beatles music stands the test of time a bit better than the 'Stones.
??
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Re: looking forward to this::

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SternAAlbifrons wrote: Sun Nov 28, 2021 5:16 am Back then you were either a Rolling Stones man - or a Beatles fan.
(edgy challenging Nat Young, or smiling blonde goodboy Midget Farrelly - the surfing equivs)

I started as one - but ended up on the dark side (of course)
However these days i would say most of the Beatles music stands the test of time a bit better than the 'Stones.
??
You left out the Beach boys.

"Pet sounds:" was a fantastic album> Yet few, outside of america, know of them of their importance in Pop music ( unless they were into cars and surfing :-) in the 60's )

Few pop albums – before or since – have enjoyed the notoriety of Pet Sounds, which for decades has been showered with almost every accolade imaginable and continues to be a high achiever in magazine polls ranking the best pop and rock LPs of all time.

It is considered to be among the most influential albums in music history.
Incorporating elements of pop, jazz, exotica, classical, and the avant-garde, Wilson's Wall of Sound-based orchestrations mixed conventional rock set-ups with elaborate layers of vocal harmonies, found sounds, and instruments never before associated with rock, such as bicycle bells, French horn, flutes, Electro-Theremin, string sections, and beverage cans. The album could not be replicated live and was the first time a group departed from the usual small-ensemble electric rock band format for a whole LP. An early concept album, it consists mainly of introspective songs like "I Know There's an Answer", a critique of LSD users; and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times", the first use of a theremin-like instrument on a rock record. The album's unprecedented total production cost exceeded $70,000 (equivalent to $560,000 in 2020). An expanded edition, The Pet Sounds Sessions, was released in 1997 with isolated vocals and instrumental versions, session highlights, and the album's first true stereo mix.

Pet Sounds revolutionized the field of music production and the role of producers within the music industry, introduced novel approaches to orchestration, chord voicings, and structural harmonies, and furthered the cultural legitimization of popular music, a greater public appreciation for albums, the use of recording studios as an instrument, and the development of psychedelic music and progressive/art rock. It has topped several critics' and musicians' polls for the best album of all time, including those published by NME, Mojo, Uncut, and The Times. In 2004, it was inducted into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. It has been certified platinum by the RIAA, indicating over one million units sold.
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Re: looking forward to this::

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Agree with what you say. Ringo just got on with it, successfully. Oasis were a better live act with Tony Mccarroll, Keane were rubbish without their drummer and more than anything, The Who were awful with Kenny Jones.
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Re: looking forward to this::

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phuketrichard wrote: Sun Nov 28, 2021 7:25 am
You left out the Beach boys.

"Pet sounds:" was a fantastic album> Yet few, outside of america, know of them of their importance in Pop music ( unless they were into cars and surfing :-) in the 60's )
Are you joking? They were a huge band internationally. Pet Sounds got to No 2 in the UK charts. Their later work got higher chart positions in the UK than in the US.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Beach ... iscography

Here's something you may not know:
Much of the album was produced while the band was on tour in Japan using the cream of Los Angeles session musicians known as “The Wrecking Crew”.
https://www.classicrockreview.com/2011/ ... et-sounds/
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Re: looking forward to this::

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Re: looking forward to this::

Post by SternAAlbifrons »

I'm not.
I loved that album ^^ but enduring 4 hours yawn of Frank Zappa live was the most boring event in my equally long long life.

He succumbed to arty-fartness i reckon.
- but he was so cool that nobody (incl me) was brave enough at the time, or discerning enough, to point out that emperor had long since lost his clothes.
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xandreu wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 9:11 pm I'm very impressed at the way they've made it look as if it was filmed using fairly modern camera equipment - I believe the term is that it's been digitised. If it weren't for the obvious 70's fashions of the era and the outdated recorded equipment, you could be forgiven for thinking it was filmed fairly recently.

I know that most people think of Lennon and McCartney as the main Beatles, but I've always found Ringo Star to be one of the more fascinating and underrated band members. Drum tracks often get overlooked in music and drummers have been likened to monkeys just randomly hitting things with sticks, as if it's the easiest job within a band, but a good drum section can really make or break a track and RIngo has always appeared to carry off some of the most iconic drum tracks with absolute ease. I saw somewhere that RIngo was the only band member who was never told or advised what to do by the other members. They had full faith in whatever he produced. If you think of some of the most iconic Beatles tracks - Strawberry fields, A Day in the life, Here comes the sun, it's the drum tracks that really carry the songs in my opinion.

I also like a band called Keane - their first album (Hopes and fears) remains one of my most favourite albums of all time. But in their second album, they sacked the drummer and decided to go with a drum machine instead. To the untrained ear, it was difficult to hear the difference, but you just know that something isn't right. There's no expression, no character, every beat has the same velocity and it was just awful. I haven't liked a single album of theirs since that first one and it's all down to their decision to replace a real life human drummer, capable of making every beat slightly different in it's individual expressiveness with effectively a synthesised robot who wouldn't understand musical character if it was placed with Apple Bionic A18 Drum Character super advanced processor.

You could say the same about Oasis. And many other bands. Good drummers never ever seem to get the recognition they deserve but if you analyse what makes a good track a good track, you will often see that it's the drums.
You left out one of the best, Phil Collins -

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Re: looking forward to this::

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SternAAlbifrons wrote: Sun Nov 28, 2021 10:17 pm I'm not.
I loved that album ^^ but enduring 4 hours yawn of Frank Zappa live was the most boring event in my equally long long life.

He succumbed to arty-fartness i reckon.
- but he was so cool that nobody (incl me) was brave enough at the time, or discerning enough, to point out that emperor had long since lost his clothes.
Oh yes, Frank put out a ton of stuff that can be considered unlistenable by many people.

Eventually, he annoyed a sufficient number of the wrong people and they took care of him.
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Re: looking forward to this::

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AndyKK wrote: Sun Nov 28, 2021 10:57 pm
xandreu wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 9:11 pm

I know that most people think of Lennon and McCartney as the main Beatles, but I've always found Ringo Star to be one of the more fascinating and underrated band members. Drum tracks often get overlooked in music and drummers have been likened to monkeys just randomly hitting things with sticks, as if it's the easiest job within a band, but a good drum section can really make or break a track and RIngo has always appeared to carry off some of the most iconic drum tracks with absolute ease. I saw somewhere that RIngo was the only band member who was never told or advised what to do by the other members. They had full faith in whatever he produced. If you think of some of the most iconic Beatles tracks - Strawberry fields, A Day in the life, Here comes the sun, it's the drum tracks that really carry the songs in my opinion.
You could say the same about Oasis. And many other bands. Good drummers never ever seem to get the recognition they deserve but if you analyse what makes a good track a good track, you will often see that it's the drums.
You left out one of the best, Phil Collins -

What do you call a guy who always hangs around musicians? A drummer....
The greatest drummers played the skins like a separate instrument, not just keeping the beat like Ringo and most others. Best examples of talented drummers would be Keith Moon (just hear him on Wont Get Fooled Again), Jon Hiseman, and of course Ginger Baker. Beatles? They lost me when they moved into the 'novelty song' market - Rocky Raccoon, Maxwells Silver Hammer etc, even Obladi Oblada - like trite, childish nursery rhymes. But that Get Back track on the rooftop? Brilliant.
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