The Curry Club

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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:04 pm

Doc67 wrote:
Sat Sep 12, 2020 11:03 am

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I always add my own coriander and salad, yogurt. The rice was cooked good without grains sticking together, nan bread was just right to accompany the curry dish. The Vindaloo, nice cuts of chicken with good potato to balance the meal, just the right taste of spice infused slightly with vinegar, just got enough, all curry addicts should know it's only the piss head's back at home who think the dish should blow your head off. In reality it maybe on the hot side, but if it's made good it will be palatable without grabbing the glass of water to put out the fire. If I was to mark the food alone on its own merits I would give it a top mark 5/5.
Let's hope for the next too be has good.
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All I can add is wonderful in a nutshell. Also I will have one more serving from the order.
I always add my own coriander and salad, yogurt.


I do the same. Red onions, tomato and cucumber in a mint yoghurt, with fresh chopped coriander over the lot.

I have always steered clear of Vindaloo because I didn't trust the UK restaurants not to try to blow my head off thinking that what is desired. It's interesting to hear that this place doesn't try that trick. I might well give it a go as my tolerance to chilli heat is quite high at the moment. Thanks for the tip.
[/quote]
Yoghurt is good on the side of the plate, its always there if things just get a little heated, you can always dip your spoon or nan bread into the cooling natural yoghurt, or if the curry is too hot overall, mix in some of the yoghurt bit by bit until the right medium is found, its a bit over the top, but similar to having a lifeguard at the side of the swimming pool. Slightly sweet Lassi is my big favourite, now that is a life saver when things get too hot. Serious now, I do not like "hot curries", by saying this, I don't like, is where heat takes over flavour. This was a thing mainly in our own country, with the machos on a Friday night after a skin full of beer.



Vindaloo - definition and versions

Your dictionary -
a highly spiced curry originating in Goa, India, and usually containing vinegar
of or relating to this curry or to the hottest or spiciest kinds of curry: vindaloo spices.

merriam-webster -
a curried dish of Indian origin made with meat or shellfish, garlic, and wine or vinegar.

My version of the classic Vindaloo dish is, yes it is spicy, but not overpowering to mask the flavour of spices and its ingredients.
I agree back in the days of Vasco da Gama, meat would go rotten on long sea journeys, so it would be masked, like the explanation below. If I ever get a salty or over spiced dish, I normally think the meat is past its sell by date.

A standard element of Goan cuisine derived from the Portuguese carne de vinha d'alhos (literally "meat in garlic wine marinade"), a vindaloo is a dish of meat (usually pork) marinated in wine and garlic. The basic structure of the Portuguese dish was the Portuguese sailor's "preserved" raw ingredients, packed in wooden barrels of alternate layers of pork and garlic, and soaked in red wine. This was "Indianized" by the local Goan cooks with the substitution of palm vinegar for the red wine, and the addition of dried red chili peppers with additional spices. It evolved into the localized and easy-to-pronounce dish "vindaloo".

The British Indian version of vindaloo calls for the meat to be marinated in vinegar, sugar, fresh ginger and spices, then cooked with more spices.

Indian preparation and variations
Restaurants in Goa offering traditional Goan cuisine, prepare vindaloo with pork, which is the original recipe. The dish was popularized by Goan cooks (whom the British favoured, because they had no issues in kitchens and bars when handling beef, pork or alcohol) in the British establishments and the ocean-going liners. A Kerala version of this recipe includes the usage of drumstick (moringa) tree's bark, which is believed to help with digestion. Restaurants in other parts of India prepare vindaloo with chicken or goat meat or lamb, which is sometimes mixed with cubed potatoes. Even though the word aloo (आलू) means potato in Hindi, (as the name is a corruption of a Portuguese phrase with no Hindi etymology) traditional vindaloo does not include potatoes.

Outside India
Vindaloo has gained popularity outside of India, where it is almost universally featured on menus at Indian restaurants. Vindaloo served in restaurants of the United Kingdom differs from the original vindaloo dish; it is simply a spicier version of the standard "medium (spiciness)" restaurant curry with the addition of vinegar, potatoes and chili peppers.

Vindaloo is one of the spiciest dishes available on British Asian menus where it is served, although British Bangladeshi restaurants have innovated the tindaloo, which is a quite different dish that originated in Bangladesh. The British variation originated from British Bangladeshi restaurants in the 1970s. Vindaloo is considered a predecessor to phall.

Happy eating Doc let us know how you get on. Don't forget the yoghurt :beer3:
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by hanno » Sun Sep 13, 2020 3:55 pm

The only Indian restaurant in town has closed, so I had to make my own Murgh Makhani and Dal Tadka.. It was good, if I say so myself.

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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Mon Sep 14, 2020 4:49 am

hanno wrote:
Sun Sep 13, 2020 3:55 pm
The only Indian restaurant in town has closed, so I had to make my own Murgh Makhani and Dal Tadka.. It was good, if I say so myself.

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Looks good to me too hanno, since we have not got anywhere has keyboard warrior's to have a sample, by only the means due to our number of pixels we can view your two dishes, but like you, the chief and creator of your delights of Murgh Makhani and Dal Tadka have rightly the dishes to enjoy and savor.
These hanno are two splendid Punjabi dishes, that have seen there way into the restaurants menus recently, Murgh Makhani many may know has butter chicken, and that of an excellent tasty meal, and too my liking. Dal is very common for Indians to eat, being their staple diet along with rice.
Before my first visit to India, I stopped eating meat
for some length of time, in preparation with regards to what I had read from guide books, on the care of what you eat. It turned into more, a bit of a fitness kick, stopped smoking too.
The time arrived when I walked out of the airport doors in Mumbai for the very first time, the crowded street I had never incounted, so in mid confusion, and overwhelming heat, my body sensers were working overtime, strong aromer of spices and urine we're in the air, pulling on my clothes, we're that of begger boy's and rickshaw and taxi driver's both of wanted my money, there was so much pushing and shoving going on. I walked on getting a rickshaw out of the way of the craziness. The next thing I was sitting at a Streets open shop restaurant eating butter chicken and roti (wow food was excellent) then, to finish, and before my next move of excitement and experiences, calming of myself, a smoke of a cigarette, both were very welcome.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:10 am

Believe it or not, I actually had a Indian meal last night too. I was wondering about the Vindaloo, but where I decided to have one picked up and delivered, did not have any Vindaloo dish on the menu, in a way I was happy enough to have a change anyway.
My favorites are the medium strength Curries, the likes such has Bhuna and Masala, these are the dishes that offer a full flavor with use of spices and that of a medium strength, with meats of chicken or lamb. Kufta (meat balls) being a long time favorite, only once had this here in Phnom Penh. I happened to pick up a menu from a back table in a restaurant, and was delighted to see this and ordered, the meal was delicious, I told the restaurant so, how satisfying the meal was on the whole, the reply was, that was of an old menu that should have been thrown away, so now that particular dish is discontinued. I was going to go on, seeing if I could get a Meat Kufta Sag Masala, probably my favorite dish of all, but from their previous reply there was not much point carrying on with the conversation, most places I have noticed don't want to move away from the menu dishes, or even adapt, only on the likes of strength.
I have had a couple of good Keema (minced meat) dishes, but still have not had a mixed meat and vegetable dishes, apart from some Vindaloos. But I have had vegetable dishes alone, mostly they have been not too bad, but I feel in some cases the dishes are too highly priced, such has most meat starters of most restaurants.

Bhuna, a medium to hot dish, cooked to what is referred to a dry curry. The dish originates from Bengal, prepared typically by frying meat with spices ( in oil with no water ) at a high temperature.

Masala, is literally "spice/spices". It is used to denote either a single spice or a mixture of spices like garam masala. The term curry. Literally curry is anything cooked in a blend of spices with a little oil and water.

The order was from the Namaste India (BKK)
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Once again order and delivery placed with food panda.
Chicken tikka masala, probably many people's old time favorite. It arrived containing two dips and a yogurt, but sadly no side salad.
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Poppadom to start
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The Roti I found to be on the small size, but tasty.
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Overall the meal was good, chicken very tender and good mix of spice.
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Always "hope" but never "expect".
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by Doc67 » Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:21 am

AndyKK wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:10 am
Believe it or not, I actually had a Indian meal last night too. I was wondering about the Vindaloo, but where I decided to have one picked up and delivered, did not have any Vindaloo dish on the menu, in a way I was happy enough to have a change anyway.
My favorites are the medium strength Curries, the likes such has Bhuna and Masala, these are the dishes that offer a full flavor with use of spices and that of a medium strength, with meats of chicken or lamb. Kufta (meat balls) being a long time favorite, only once had this here in Phnom Penh. I happened to pick up a menu from a back table in a restaurant, and was delighted to see this and ordered, the meal was delicious, I told the restaurant so, how satisfying the meal was on the whole, the reply was, that was of an old menu that should have been thrown away, so now that particular dish is discontinued. I was going to go on, seeing if I could get a Meat Kufta Sag Masala, probably my favorite dish of all, but from their previous reply there was not much point carrying on with the conversation, most places I have noticed don't want to move away from the menu dishes, or even adapt, only on the likes of strength.
I have had a couple of good Keema (minced meat) dishes, but still have not had a mixed meat and vegetable dishes, apart from some Vindaloos. But I have had vegetable dishes alone, mostly they have been not too bad, but I feel in some cases the dishes are too highly priced, such has most meat starters of most restaurants.

Bhuna, a medium to hot dish, cooked to what is referred to a dry curry. The dish originates from Bengal, prepared typically by frying meat with spices ( in oil with no water ) at a high temperature.

Masala, is literally "spice/spices". It is used to denote either a single spice or a mixture of spices like garam masala. The term curry. Literally curry is anything cooked in a blend of spices with a little oil and water.

The order was from the Namaste India (BKK)
Image

Once again order and delivery placed with food panda.
Chicken tikka masala, probably many people's old time favorite. It arrived containing two dips and a yogurt, but sadly no side salad.
Image

Poppadom to start
Image

The Roti I found to be on the small size, but tasty.
Image

Overall the meal was good, chicken very tender and good mix of spice.
Image
50% discount?? That's seriously good value. And Ahhh...Chicken Tikka Masala; everyone's 'first' curry (if they know what's good for them)

Just my opinion, but I don't think Roti's travel well. They really need to be out of the tandoor and on your table while they are still too hot to handle and crispy. 10 minutes later and it all over, they are like chewing a seat cushion. I think Naan is a better bet for delivery, but again, you can't beat an hot oven-fresh one.

I must get onboard with the Panda 50% discount game.
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Mon Sep 14, 2020 12:48 pm

Doc67 wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:21 am
AndyKK wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 11:10 am
Believe it or not, I actually had a Indian meal last night.
50% discount?? That's seriously good value. And Ahhh...Chicken Tikka Masala; everyone's 'first' curry (if they know what's good for them)

Just my opinion, but I don't think Roti's travel well. They really need to be out of the tandoor and on your table while they are still too hot to handle and crispy. 10 minutes later and it all over, they are like chewing a seat cushion. I think Naan is a better bet for delivery, but again, you can't beat an hot oven-fresh one.

I must get onboard with the Panda 50% discount game.
Roti's and Chappatie's I prefer if rice is involved too, with the Vindaloo dishes I have been having just bread, the good old plane Naan, also I have ordered the same from each restaurant, so prices can be compared.
The Chicken Tikka Masala "everyone's 'first' curry" if the one I ordered last night was to be their first, it may just have been the first and last! You could put it into the Vindaloo challenge, and I give it a mark of 4/5.
Doc food panda is well worth it, one because it is convenient, two it costs you nothing, but I do tip the rider's.
Only problem now, I find they must work on a distance, but nowhere does it say. So now apparently I have a few more to go at, then I seem to be out of range of some I want to try. I have thought about this, and I will go for a drink nearer to the restaurant and have it delivered hopefully to the bar if possible, that will keep me in with the larger discount. If collection from the restaurant, you get 15% discount.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Thu Sep 17, 2020 1:48 am

Nothing to do with Curries because unfortunately they were all closed, I would expect because of the holidays of Pchum Ben. But I ordered food for us both, from a place I have had food delivered via food panda for my partner, who said that the meal was good.
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So we see with the discount our meal came to a total price of $4.35 cheap!
Arrived on time and traveled well with food panda.
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Good value for the meals, that is of no doubt.
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When you make an order with food panda, you can see roughly where the rider is, and there direction of travel. I thought I would look for the shop on Google maps. There it was in a slightly different name nearby the Russian market, but with the name matching on the bottom of the menu.
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But what we see is what Richard and a few more members mentioned about inflating or discrepancy in price. Yes I do believe it to happen, but again if you are still paying that of a decent price for your food, and you are happy with the results, then no harm done.
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Mon Sep 21, 2020 1:16 am

Did anyone get delivery food on Friday night? Looks like food panda don't come out in the rain or work on holidays, understandable, again this is the land of wonder, where it rains for a good half of the year and holidays, there's so many. This could eventually be taken on buy a Chinese company filling in the gap's, more so with their growth of the restaurant and food industry growth. The thread posted before, about western people not allowed in their establishments, bite the bullet and order take away, If you desire the food so much.
My plans actually changed I was originally going to celebrate the holidays away from home, but in a way I am glad I didn't, with the rainfall over the period. But with planning for going away, I too had no food at home, the fridge was empty. And my partner was sick, and caring for her my sleep pattern is all over, but not to worry, I have the rain and Cambodian roads and the other users to contend with.
I did notice has I opened the app food panda once more to check that someone was working, I then started to order from one restaurant, too be informed that the restaurant was now closed. The pickup/self collection service was available, but a little thin, although if you order online you get 15% discount on orders. Coriander Indian restaurant was there, so I ordered only to find out you need to use a credit/debit card for the service.
I went out on the bike in the end between the showers, being the only alternative to get some food. I didn't want to go far and the Indian restaurant "Coriander" is good at 8km round trip. The weather was at a light drizzle now but restaurants would close in a short time, and I was unaware of any was to adapt to the holiday and change the hours of closing.
I pulled up outside the restaurant to be welcomed by that of an old friend, now working at the restaurant, after the handshakes and greetings I mentioned that I had tried to order from food panda, he had a word with the manager and gave me the same discount on my order.
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Sorry, for me I have no review, due to it maybe very acceptable too another curry lover, the meal for me was a complete disaster, devistaited and on the whole disapointed, the three big "D's". It's the ingredient you can see in the photo, the dark oily speck's, this is something that totally disagrees with my body, making me vomit with just the smallest of taste.
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Thu Sep 24, 2020 7:52 am

Chicken Hariyali
This is a dish I have never tried before, its origin is of Pakistani/Indian
That of a Punjabi dish, and there so very popular in the area. Hariyali means greenery
I actually thought I was going to have an alternative to the Chicken Saag dish, well I did in fact, no Saag (Spinach) or at least very little of the leaf vegetable. This dish is certainly an alternative, to the more popular tomato-based curry. The dish is also referred too as a green curry. Its ingredients are of ginger and garlic paste, coriander, mint, green yogurt and green chili peppers that give it hell of a kick.

So here is the order and a photo of the dish
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Although a little on the hot side for my liking, (but alongside the yogurt) a little pineapple will take the edge off the heat. The Hariyali dish would easily be a contender in that of the Vindaloo challenge if we would go by the heat of the dish, and it would be surely the clear winner with a score 5/5. But like I have mentioned before, it's not all about heat, (yes it maybe to some), but I enjoy a curry for its taste, or rather, I should say many tastes.
For eating a curry, its rating of heat is, and never had been any interest too myself, being, if that dish is unpleasant or hampered by the mouth burning, and the taste buds have gone into hiding, the dish then becomes something, to my thoughts of that of nothingness.
Why are we drawn to eating curries, the obvious answer is because we like them? But is that the only reason?
Firstly, the curry dish laid on the table, our sense of smell is alerted with the aroma from the food, it's the start, next is the taste when taking the first spoon or bread from the plate into one’s mouth.
We may have also taken that for granted over past years, or the certain foods may have become normal or bland in our daily diets, also the smoking of cigarettes will affect our taste. (in my case).
But the first mouthful of curry will be sure to activate the sensors of taste, mostly depending on what type you prefer, it could be that of a mild sensation to the only way I could explain, is that of an explosion to ones taste, that now is working on overtime mode, the sensors now relating information, of ingredients and that of their taste, alerted and tantalizing of the sensor in action from spices and chili’s.
Our taste buds are on overtime, and this triggered by the taste of such ingredient’s meat or vegetable and that of a mixture of spices being that of the key, not forgetting the alternativeness on the heat.
I know that there are plenty of other food that does the same for our liking, but the curry does it in what is a kind of seduction way, or better it captives in we might even yearn for the taste, not that dissimilar to a drug, because of cause and by that of activating few triggers the sensors of taste from the dish of few ingredients.
Beware curry maybe addictive, to some of us anyway.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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Re: The Curry Club

Post by AndyKK » Thu Sep 24, 2020 8:01 am

Sorry my Wi-Fi is causing me problems - bu I found this just recently

Can we get addicted to curry?
BBC News - British 'addicted to curry'

By BBC consumer affairs correspondent Karen Bowerman

The British love of curries may be more than just a fondness for the taste, new research suggests.
Scientists at Nottingham Trent University have discovered that people can actually become addicted to curries, because they arouse and stimulate the senses.
Their findings indicate that people do not just crave curry because of its spicy taste, but also because it stimulates the senses and provides a natural high.
However, the claims have been dismissed by other food experts.
Apparently just anticipating eating a curry is equally effective.
The Nottingham Trent scientists say sitting down to eat a chicken korma increases our heart beat by an extra three beats a minute, a tikka masala increases it by four and a half, and a rogan josh by seven.
In contrast, traditional British meals such as fish and chips barely increase the heart rate at all.
And it is not just the spices of the dish which appear to get us going.
'State of confusion'
Curry sauce makers Sharwood's commissioned the research, to discover why curries have become an integral part of British culture.
Professor Stephen Gray from Nottingham Trent University says the whole combination of tastes in a curry stimulate far more taste receptors on the tongue than other commonly eaten British foods.
He said: "By activating several areas of the tongue simultaneously, we are literally dazzling our taste buds to a state of confusion.
Traditional British foods fail to do this, due to the basic flavour combinations.
"When we crave a curry, it seems our taste buds are literally crying out for stimulation."
And the older we get, the more stimulation we need - so people should not be surprised if older people are just as keen on hot curries as young men who head to the curry house after a night in the pub.
Some doubted the claims that curry could be physically addictive.
Dr Wendy Doyle, of the British Dietetic Association, said: "I can understand cravings, but I'm not aware of any food that can cause an addiction."

Social high

Dickon Ross, a writer on food science, said curry was seen as a social food, and part of the associated high may be due to people having a good time while eating it.
But he said: "This research does not show that there is anything particular in curries that is making us physically addicted to it.
"The addiction may be more similar to other kinds of 'natural high' addictions, like gambling, shopping, or internet use."
Nutritionists warn while curry eating may work wonders for our senses, creamy dishes favoured by many curry lovers are not quite so beneficial when it comes to our health.
Sara Stanner, of the British Nutrition Foundation, said: "The curries that are very popular in this country do tend to the be the ones with the creamy sauces, so they can be high in fat and calories which help people put on weight."
But as long as we stick to the less fattening sauces, and lean meat, or vegetables - and do not eat curry every single day - we cannot go too far wrong.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
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