Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Specific for motorized transportation devices. Daelims included... barely.
Element6
Expatriate
Posts: 166
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2016 1:33 pm
Reputation: 64
Cambodia

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by Element6 » Wed Jun 17, 2020 10:59 am

Has anyone bought one of these?

As a result of this thread i popped in to the showroom (behind the MG showroom in that modern-ish looking block just over Makara 7 bridge).

I have to say I was quite surprised by the build quality, it was much better than I was expecting and the bikes looked great and well finished. I thought the Himalayan looked very nice and would quite happily have one in my stable. Seat height was OK (i believe 31 inches) so lower than my off-road focused bikes but it still looked like it would be quite capable for mild offroad. They said they carry a full compliment of spares and they have a workshop out back for servicing. Some accessories not yet available nor were prices but I am sure over time they will come.

Was quoted $4990 for the Himalayan but didn't try to negotiate any discount and didn't ask the price of other models as they were not of interest to me

Someone has obviously spend a good amount getting the showroom up to a nice standard and having a good selection of bikes to view (they said they had more colours in stock not not on show).

Overall some good looking bikes and definitely something to consider if you want to be touring around Cambodia
whatwat
Expatriate
Posts: 260
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 12:30 pm
Reputation: 55
Hong Kong

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by whatwat » Wed Jun 17, 2020 11:22 am

“Cheap” because made in India as apposed to Japan for everything else, or Thailand for the Stallion which were overpriced and part Chinese anyway.

Simple long stroke lazy engines. No need for liquid cooling. Easy to fix (much like the FTR, Phantom etc).
Don’t listen to Chinese whispers.
Element6
Expatriate
Posts: 166
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2016 1:33 pm
Reputation: 64
Cambodia

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by Element6 » Wed Jun 17, 2020 1:39 pm

for sure not a racing machine :)
0-100kph in 11 - 12 seconds is in non-turbo diesel car territory so you are not going to be winning any traffic light races, probably not even against the 125cc moto's zipping around the city. That said I think people find part of their charm to be the more relaxed pace that they bring. I like the idea but not sure how i would cope with the reality!

I will reiterate though that visually they didn't appear built to a very cheap budget, I was surprised but the quality of the fit and finish and thought the Himalayan looked really great
whatwat
Expatriate
Posts: 260
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 12:30 pm
Reputation: 55
Hong Kong

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by whatwat » Wed Jun 17, 2020 2:37 pm

I’m not surprised. The Bajaj motorcycles are not far behind Japanese builds and way ahead of any Chinese offering, in fact price per quality they exceed the Jap bikes easily.
Don’t listen to Chinese whispers.
User avatar
AndyKK
Expatriate
Posts: 2929
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:32 am
Reputation: 912
Great Britain

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by AndyKK » Wed Jun 17, 2020 2:44 pm

Element6 wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 1:39 pm
for sure not a racing machine :)
0-100kph in 11 - 12 seconds is in non-turbo diesel car territory so you are not going to be winning any traffic light races, probably not even against the 125cc moto's zipping around the city. That said I think people find part of their charm to be the more relaxed pace that they bring. I like the idea but not sure how i would cope with the reality!

I will reiterate though that visually they didn't appear built to a very cheap budget, I was surprised but the quality of the fit and finish and thought the Himalayan looked really great
whatwat wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 9:05 am
I think they are a few years too early for the burgeoning Cambodian middle class.
They like their big bikes but soon realise they are too heavy (180kg bike compared to a 40kg human!) and sell them. Which is why big bikes are pretty cheap here even compared to back home.

I think Enfield are on to something. Have you seen how many locals own bicycles now, some $$$$. It’s the new look at me. Two years ago they wouldn’t be seen dead on one now they are everywhere and more shops opening up.
whatwat I do know of a few Khmer with large bikes, I don't think that is a true outlook comparing the size to weight, why Khmer have large bikes and then sell them, cost and practicalities would be a main factor, mainly parts, repairs and servicing, few I know would take their Japanese bike to Thailand for service. The bikes that do catch my eye are surely of the rich or connected, and when they come up for sale at a low price you would think a good bargain, but make sure the import duties are paid in full, or it will turn out very expensive. Also their are a few import models that can't be road registered because they have a lower amount of frame and engine numbers to comply with the Public Works and Transport. You also mentioned how cheaper price wise bikes are compared with overseas.

2018 Kawasaki Z1000R ABS
European Specifications/Technical Details, Europe/UK MSRP Price: £11599 GBP (OTR Inc. 20% Vat)
Kawasaki Z1000 R Kawasaki KH Phnom Penh $26500 Tax Paper
Kawasaki Z900 UK Price £8,900. Kawasaki KH Phnom Penh Price $12500

Cambodian Royal Enfield, Interceptor Standard 650: $6000
Royal Enfield UK, Interceptor Standard 650: £5999 RRP On the Road (Including road tax & first registration)

Haywards of Cambridge, official dealer for Royal Enfield motorcycles, Interceptor Standard 650: £5,699.00 on the road, 36 month / unlimited mileage warranty included.

Thing is if its not a new or unregistered bike you can't put it in your name. So who owns the second-hand bike? Its really of no matter because its not owned technically by you or me whom bought it.
So what too about selling a bike, it would be unlikely a Khmer would buy, unless you give it away, so the resale market is limited to small.

Element6, sure you are right with your post, would you want to go fast on these roads? Anyway looked up these one offs you may like of Royal Enfield's -

Image

Image
Always "hope" but never "expect".
User avatar
clutchcargo
Expatriate
Posts: 3989
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2018 3:09 pm
Reputation: 2285
Cambodia

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by clutchcargo » Wed Jun 17, 2020 3:17 pm

AndyKK wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 2:44 pm
Also their are a few import models that can't be road registered because they have a lower amount of frame and engine numbers to comply with the Public Works and Transport.
Maybe a bit off topic but do you have more info on this Andy? Which models? Link? Does this apply to ones where the import tax has been paid?
User avatar
AndyKK
Expatriate
Posts: 2929
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:32 am
Reputation: 912
Great Britain

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by AndyKK » Wed Jun 17, 2020 4:43 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 8:57 am
WineOxley wrote:Loookin good. Doubt they'll stand up in comparison to the Honda Dream though.
They'll always be a niche market here. They're not exactly versatile bikes, and cost quite a bit (though you get four times the power for double the price of a Scoopy). If you're into cafe racers, then a used CB400is likely cheaper anyways. I'd probably buy one in a few months if the timing was right. My only concern is whether it would be versatile enough as a daily driver (parking etc). Also, I could get a used Japanese bike in very good condition for around the same price point or a bit more, which makes for a more difficult choice.
I have had quite a few bikes here mostly second hand, but they have been fun, mostly bought for day to day use and of course trips in mind. I have to say that I have had many memorable trips over past years. I bought a new MSX Honda just to have one registered in my own name. After one of my trips I wanted a bike with a bit more grunt, so the search was on for the bike you mentioned in your post, that of the classic Honda CB400SS single cylinder not that of the complicated electronic multi cylinder. But it had to be that of an original few Japanese import and not of the Chinese Mash model. I looked at one in Koh Kong, the seller wanted $4000, we negotiated over three days and his lowest price came to $3500. Another one was in a poor condition, two more were Chinese. I eventually fell on a good one by chance and bought it from a reputable dealer whom told me there are very few left in the country. I have done a few adjustments to the bike but it really needed nothing. It was good on my last trip (other parts on the trip I still have not finished typing up). To be honest I was making plans of another trip, but since the new traffic laws came into force I have not been out on the bike. You could say I have lost heart, due to the fact of losing freedom in some way, and your own means of transport, what I am meaning to say, if you are legal and the police want to fine you, they will do so, too add to that I would not want to stay in a country that took away the right of you having your own means of transport. Time will tell, but you could say I may be ready to move on, so the bike may appear on here next in the for sale section.

Image

Image
Always "hope" but never "expect".
User avatar
WineOxley
Expatriate
Posts: 61
Joined: Tue Dec 17, 2019 5:04 pm
Reputation: 10
Great Britain

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by WineOxley » Fri Jun 19, 2020 10:50 pm

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 8:57 am
WineOxley wrote:Loookin good. Doubt they'll stand up in comparison to the Honda Dream though.
They'll always be a niche market here. They're not exactly versatile bikes, and cost quite a bit (though you get four times the power for double the price of a Scoopy). If you're into cafe racers, then a used CB400is likely cheaper anyways. I'd probably buy one in a few months if the timing was right. My only concern is whether it would be versatile enough as a daily driver (parking etc). Also, I could get a used Japanese bike in very good condition for around the same price point or a bit more, which makes for a more difficult choice.
Sure would be fun to pick one up for a tour around the country solo, with a couple of mates or GF.

Enfields are big bikes though, and aren't that light if I recall.

Would prefer a smaller bike for point A - point B around town.
Lands and cities are left astern,your faults will follow you whithersoever you travel.
User avatar
AndyKK
Expatriate
Posts: 2929
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:32 am
Reputation: 912
Great Britain

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by AndyKK » Sat Jun 20, 2020 1:40 am

clutchcargo wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 3:17 pm
AndyKK wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 2:44 pm
Also their are a few import models that can't be road registered because they have a lower amount of frame and engine numbers to comply with the Public Works and Transport.
Maybe a bit off topic but do you have more info on this Andy? Which models? Link? Does this apply to ones where the import tax has been paid?
This came about before I bought the Honda, at the time I had seen a Yamaha SR of a dealers and wanted possibly a test drive after viewing the bike, that's when he told me it needed a plate, I rung him relentless times to arrange the former, in the end he said it would be impossible to sell to a westerner, I said the opposite due to it obviously not being registered beforehand, he told me then that the ministry would not register the bike due to there was something like 8 numbers frame and engine (matching) opposed to the regulation 10 numbers. I put it down too he just didn't want to sell me the bike. But when I bought the Honda from another dealer he was calling the numbers out while I was checking them on the bike, I asked him the question of the number of digits needed, and he confirmed what the other dealer said, being that there had been some other changers in the law.
Also I have known of westerners being refused the sale of new bikes in Phnom Penh, but if you manage to buy one new, then by law you are able to have it registered in your own name so you are the legal owner of that bike. I have in the past bought two new bikes and had them registered, look at this in more detail! One of the two bikes when I scanned the barcode on the owners card came up with all the details as they should, but this card showed the owner not in my name, but that of Mr Honda. When confronting the dealer on this matter he refused to talk to me.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
offroadscholar
Expatriate
Posts: 300
Joined: Sun Jul 23, 2017 1:55 pm
Reputation: 79
Australia

Re: Royal Enfield motorcycles now in Cambodia

Post by offroadscholar » Wed Jun 24, 2020 8:58 am

Like any road bike with short travel suspension, and twin shocks compared to monoshock, they'll be heavy pigs around town, and not comfortable on crappy country roads.
If Cambodia can upgrade and maintain their national highways to a decent standard, especially through areas like the Cardamons, then there's a market for these type of bikes.
As for the Himalayan, its the most practical of the models for Cambodia, but doesnt have that cool factor, so has to compete with an array of used Japanese dualsport imports that do everything better for a similar price.
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Teddy1 and 15 guests