Internet / privacy / #101

Phones, Internet, Computers and such.
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Doc67
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by Doc67 » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:49 am

phuketrichard wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:55 am
Everything on the list is common sense and applied to 2010 as well
BUT I will add
download and run ( ITS FREE) https://www.spyhunter.com/
an amazing tool, I just did it last week, waited the 2 days to be able to delete tons of shit I never knew i had on my machines ( win7) but feel safer and my machine runs faster and the screen is brighter.
wont a normal anti-virus programme do all that?

(if this is a really stooped question then don't laugh at me!)
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by Equinix » Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:07 am

hunter8 wrote:The article missed one most important tip that everyone should begin with: do not use Windows. Anything else comes after that.
ImageImageImage

https://linuxmint.com/

[YouTube][/YouTube]


Would also recommend using https://duckduckgo.com (search engine)
Https://Startpage.com (search engine)
Https://Bitchute.com (YouTube alternative)
Https://lbry.com (digital marketplace)
Https://Minds.com (Facebook​ alternative)
Https://Gab.com (Twitter alternative)
Https://dissenter.com (browser)
Https://Brave.com (browser)
Https://Protonmail.com (email)
Https://Telegram.org (chat)


violet
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by violet » Mon Jan 20, 2020 11:49 am

^^^ you can choose to turn off updates
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xandreu
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by xandreu » Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:15 pm

Equinix wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:07 am
hunter8 wrote:The article missed one most important tip that everyone should begin with: do not use Windows. Anything else comes after that.
ImageImageImage

https://linuxmint.com/

[YouTube][/YouTube]


Would also recommend using https://duckduckgo.com (search engine)
Https://Startpage.com (search engine)
Https://Bitchute.com (YouTube alternative)
Https://lbry.com (digital marketplace)
Https://Minds.com (Facebook​ alternative)
Https://Gab.com (Twitter alternative)
Https://dissenter.com (browser)
Https://Brave.com (browser)
Https://Protonmail.com (email)
Https://Telegram.org (chat)
Every year or two I give Linux another go but I always run into problems and end up reverting back to Windows. Either I can't find a good alternative program which does the same as my Windows program, or I find myself forever opening up the terminal and typing commands in that I've no idea what they mean and neither, it would seem, does my computer.

Linux just needs two things to make it a great alternative to Windows - more user friendly and the big software houses to release Linux versions of their popular software (Adobe as a typical example)

I've always assumed that Microsoft must be putting a lot of money into brown envelopes to stop the latter of those things happening.
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:39 pm

Money in envelopes? ^^ Microsoft?? Ha!
Twist their arms, turn the screws, then the rack...
if they can't buy them.
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:48 pm

This looks like a genuine Big Story.
Scary, is not the word
and it has already been adopted, secretly with no fuss.

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It
(NYTimes, a couple of days ago)

Little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something, but you can't ban it” a backer says. (other backers include Rudy Giuliani)

Mr. Ton-That — an Australian techie and onetime model — did something momentous: He invented a tool that could end your ability to walk down the street anonymously, and provided it to hundreds of law enforcement agencies,

His tiny company, Clearview AI, devised a groundbreaking facial recognition app.
You take a picture of a person, upload it and get to see public photos of that person, along with links to where those photos appeared.
The system — whose backbone is a database of more than three billion images that Clearview claims to have scraped from Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites — goes far beyond anything ever constructed by the United States government or Silicon Valley giants.

Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy.
Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so
In 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/18/tech ... ition.html
'lucky i'm old
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SternAAlbifrons
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Mon Jan 20, 2020 5:56 pm

Update on this ^^^

EU is considering a 5 year moratorium on the use of facial recognition technology
- until they can sort out the issues, and develop appropriate policy -about privacy/oppression/commercialisation etc.
The USA, including FBI, Intelligence, local police and private investigators are already rolling.

The informed discussion around this, that i am seeing, points to far reaching flow-on effects also. in ways you would not imagine.

Scary stuff, to me and the former Google CEO anyway. Most people these days don't give a shrug.
Except of course if it is China.
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by Khmer_Risotto » Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:15 pm

There is nothing to be proud about not updating windows for 10 years. All software is full of bugs and exploits. Heck, just last week microsoft released a patch for an exploit that would allow an attacker to spoof any website's ssl cert and perform a man in the middle attack.

https://msrc-blog.microsoft.com/2020/01 ... 2020-0601/

So yes, you need to update, and often.

As others have mentioned, switching to Linux would improve security, but you still need to update. Linux Mint is best for those used to Windows.

VPN's are not great for privacy, you are simply moving your internet history from your ISP to the VPN provider. The VPN provider knows your home IP, your name/address if you paid with a credit card, and every website you visit. The cheaper the VPN is the more likely they are selling your data.



If you are really concerned about privacy when you browse the internet use the Tor Browser.

For Email, the best solution for most would be protonmail.

Use a password manager (Lastpass, 1Password, Keeper, KeePassXC) and let it generate a unique password for every website you use.

If a website provides an additional layer of security like two factor authentication DO NOT USE SMS. It is better to use google authenticator, or a yubikey.
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Re: Internet / privacy / #101

Post by xandreu » Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:29 pm

SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:48 pm
This looks like a genuine Big Story.
Scary, is not the word
and it has already been adopted, secretly with no fuss.

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It
(NYTimes, a couple of days ago)

Little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something, but you can't ban it” a backer says. (other backers include Rudy Giuliani)

Mr. Ton-That — an Australian techie and onetime model — did something momentous: He invented a tool that could end your ability to walk down the street anonymously, and provided it to hundreds of law enforcement agencies,

His tiny company, Clearview AI, devised a groundbreaking facial recognition app.
You take a picture of a person, upload it and get to see public photos of that person, along with links to where those photos appeared.
The system — whose backbone is a database of more than three billion images that Clearview claims to have scraped from Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites — goes far beyond anything ever constructed by the United States government or Silicon Valley giants.

Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy.
Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so
In 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/18/tech ... ition.html
'lucky i'm old
Privacy and anonymity went out the window a long time ago. What's worse is that we give up our right to privacy voluntarily. We walk around with devices that track our movements and can listen in to everything we say. We voluntarily give it deeply personal information about ourselves and tell ourselves that that information will remain secure, yet none of us has the slightest idea of what our phones decided to broadcast about us and to whom.

They gave us the toys to play with and in return, we gave away our freedom and liberty. To those who've grown up never knowing a world without the internet, this isn't an issue in the slightest. They assume that this is the way it's always been, and it's a cheap price to pay for what they get in return, but for the older generation, like most of us here, it is an uncomfortable concern, regardless of whether you've 'got anything to hide' or not.

Maybe not in Cambodia (yet), but in many other countries, including my own (which has the most CCTV cameras per person in the world) people are already being tracked via facial recognition, under the guise of it 'assisting law enforcement', but the crime rate continues to go up and conviction rates continue to fall so perhaps it's only a matter of time before people stop falling for this excuse.

It's one of the reasons I often come up with when people ask me '...but why Cambodia?' - Because there's still a sense of freedom here that is lacking back home. Here, I feel that the government have bigger issues than concerning themselves over what times of day I leave my house, where I go, who I talk to, how and where I spend my money, which websites I visit, who my friends are etc... All the things most western governments could easily find out given the will - if they don't already have personal profiles of every citizen already, which wouldn't surprise any of us to learn that they did.
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