Old Codger Musings:

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Milord
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Old Codger Musings:

Post by Milord » Mon Sep 15, 2014 5:18 am

Children of the 50's and 60's were given all sorts of opportunities to explore the world around them, whereas today's kids aren't even allowed to think for themselves. I believe it was that environment of encouragement that caused people to question the status quo sparking the 60's revolution. (Government forbid we should ever see anything like that again.)

Chemistry sets with actual chemicals, alcohol burners, test tubes and other "hazardous" stuff made many child's best Christmas or birthday gift list. I had one and loved it. Didn't blow anything up and I still have all my fingers and toes intact and eyesight.

I remember being given a dollop of Mercury in 6th grade science class and instructed to study it's unique properties by playing around with it. Or sitting in back of class carving my initials (and other, um... clever stuff) into the chalky white, fibrous asbestos insulation covering the hot water boiler pipes.

Played outside all during summer vacation, each day from the time we got up until after dark, getting the deepest, darkest natural tan (punishment in those days was actually being sent to my room, imagine that!) Waited for the evening mosquito truck just like we were waiting for Mr. Softee. It came weekly spewing it's DDT laden smoke clouds reducing street visibility to zero. Perfect conditions for an impromptu game of street "tag" or zombie attack. Loved following a city bus just to smell it's diesel exhaust (my mother hated being stuck behind them.)

Was taught proper gun safety (and respect for firearms) being given a BB gun when I was nine and a hand-me-down, rifle/shotgun combo when I turned 12. Rode our bicycles as fast and far as we could without any safety gear, just knew we had to be back home in time for supper. Rode motorcycles since age 14 and damned the helmet laws when they were passed. (Still don't like them.)

Took my uncle's boat out on the big lake all by myself at age 11, left in the morning and didn't return until dark all without benefit of any lifesaving devices. Boats didn't have floatation chambers in those days, they just sank. In fact, there were no safety devices, period. But then, there weren't any lawyers advertising on TV 24/7 to sue your neighbors.

Firecrackers like Cherry Bombs and M-80's could blow your hand off but because we knew that, treated them with fear and respect (although regular firecracker pranks and bottle rocket wars were fair game.) Yes, we occasionally got hurt but all of us lived to tell great stories about it.

The edges on old, lead painted, tin toys were sharp as hell, held together by unfinished tabs that were inserted in slots and bent over. Many times I remember slicing my finger wide open on those damn tabs but despite the gushing blood, never once needed the ER.

Rode standing up on the car's back floor, shoulder to shoulder with my cousins (or loaded into the bed of a pickup) as my parents drove us everywhere. My smaller siblings even slept in the rear window ledge. Nobody had seat belts and if they did, never used them, ever. And while maybe a few of us didn't make it to adulthood, more of us did than didn't and we had a damn fine time along the way, making for great memories.

Nope. The only thing we kids really feared was the A-Bomb. But hey, we all seen the government films on them and you could avoid injury just by curling up under your desk (after neatly stowing away your textbook, of course.)

In the end, I didn't lose any friends throughout those perilous days of youth and none of us lost any eyes or other body parts... at least not until the Vietnam “Police Action.” Thinking back, it seems the most dangerous thing to us kids back then was the government! Hmmm. Maybe some things don't ever change.

But really, I kind of feel sorry for kids today. Somewhere between my youth and theirs, fear mongering for profit stole away the potentially greatest moments in growing up.
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by Cowshed Cowboy » Mon Sep 15, 2014 6:42 am

Nice read Milford :thumb: Although I was seventies and I agree with your sentiments. Boy those summer holidays were great as a kid, real freedom.
Never trust a man who when left alone with a tea cosey, doesn't try it on.
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by phuketrichard » Mon Sep 15, 2014 7:30 am

great read; :hattip:

i still recall the "tests" where we had to duck under our desks.

you forgot being able to Hitchhike anywhere and even ur parents weren't worried about it
Got my first 22 at 8 and used to shot squirrels out in the back of the house
when we went to our friends house to see what they were doing rather than sms them or chat with them on facebook.
Remember ur first erector set!!!

Didn't lose any friends till one came back in a body bag in 1969
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
Milord
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by Milord » Mon Sep 15, 2014 8:07 am

Yes, erector set! Scale-a-lectric race cars. "O" gauge trains. Sea Hunt type Scuba in the pool.

I used a .303 once to shoot a squirrel out the bedroom window into a bank (hill), just found a hole.

Shot a .177 into 3 Pigeons standing on the fence. They fell back into the neighbor's pool.

Rolled the clay out of 4 x 2 'inchers' strapped to the stem of a dart. Lit and tossed dart, it went 300 feet and buried the brass tip into a tree.

I loved the Chemistry set. But it was rather loud.
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by indigo_design » Mon Sep 15, 2014 12:19 pm

Yeah, but let's face it, if we had had internet porn we would have spent a lot more time in our bedrooms. Alone.
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by Sir_Quality_U_Feel » Mon Sep 15, 2014 12:35 pm

Milord wrote:Children of the 50's and 60's were given all sorts of opportunities to explore the world around them, whereas today's kids aren't even allowed to think for themselves. I believe it was that environment of encouragement that caused people to question the status quo sparking the 60's revolution. (Government forbid we should ever see anything like that again.)

Chemistry sets with actual chemicals, alcohol burners, test tubes and other "hazardous" stuff made many child's best Christmas or birthday gift list. I had one and loved it. Didn't blow anything up and I still have all my fingers and toes intact and eyesight.

I remember being given a dollop of Mercury in 6th grade science class and instructed to study it's unique properties by playing around with it. Or sitting in back of class carving my initials (and other, um... clever stuff) into the chalky white, fibrous asbestos insulation covering the hot water boiler pipes.

Played outside all during summer vacation, each day from the time we got up until after dark, getting the deepest, darkest natural tan (punishment in those days was actually being sent to my room, imagine that!) Waited for the evening mosquito truck just like we were waiting for Mr. Softee. It came weekly spewing it's DDT laden smoke clouds reducing street visibility to zero. Perfect conditions for an impromptu game of street "tag" or zombie attack. Loved following a city bus just to smell it's diesel exhaust (my mother hated being stuck behind them.)

Was taught proper gun safety (and respect for firearms) being given a BB gun when I was nine and a hand-me-down, rifle/shotgun combo when I turned 12. Rode our bicycles as fast and far as we could without any safety gear, just knew we had to be back home in time for supper. Rode motorcycles since age 14 and damned the helmet laws when they were passed. (Still don't like them.)

Took my uncle's boat out on the big lake all by myself at age 11, left in the morning and didn't return until dark all without benefit of any lifesaving devices. Boats didn't have floatation chambers in those days, they just sank. In fact, there were no safety devices, period. But then, there weren't any lawyers advertising on TV 24/7 to sue your neighbors.

Firecrackers like Cherry Bombs and M-80's could blow your hand off but because we knew that, treated them with fear and respect (although regular firecracker pranks and bottle rocket wars were fair game.) Yes, we occasionally got hurt but all of us lived to tell great stories about it.

The edges on old, lead painted, tin toys were sharp as hell, held together by unfinished tabs that were inserted in slots and bent over. Many times I remember slicing my finger wide open on those damn tabs but despite the gushing blood, never once needed the ER.

Rode standing up on the car's back floor, shoulder to shoulder with my cousins (or loaded into the bed of a pickup) as my parents drove us everywhere. My smaller siblings even slept in the rear window ledge. Nobody had seat belts and if they did, never used them, ever. And while maybe a few of us didn't make it to adulthood, more of us did than didn't and we had a damn fine time along the way, making for great memories.

Nope. The only thing we kids really feared was the A-Bomb. But hey, we all seen the government films on them and you could avoid injury just by curling up under your desk (after neatly stowing away your textbook, of course.)

In the end, I didn't lose any friends throughout those perilous days of youth and none of us lost any eyes or other body parts... at least not until the Vietnam “Police Action.” Thinking back, it seems the most dangerous thing to us kids back then was the government! Hmmm. Maybe some things don't ever change.

But really, I kind of feel sorry for kids today. Somewhere between my youth and theirs, fear mongering for profit stole away the potentially greatest moments in growing up.
I was an 80s n early 90s kid. Loved the read because I did all that stuff too. I am 29 years old and I think I was right on the fringe of the "bubble" movement. As in kids are put into a protective bubble early on. Technology is playing a huge role still in how we learn and communicate with each other. The Internet made the world a small place and took the wonder out of travelling. Not a lot of "secret" spots left on earth. Someone has taken a pic and blogged about it by now .
I'll give ya 500 Riel for it...
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by flying chicken » Mon Sep 15, 2014 12:39 pm

Peeking at my math teacher's cleavage and fight with the Maoris.
EVERYONE BOW DOWN AND PAY EXTREME HOMAGE TO HIS MAJESTIES flying chicken©
Milord
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by Milord » Mon Sep 15, 2014 1:58 pm

^^Before the internet there were photos of Natives in National Geographic, B&W Naturist magazines,
and tacky 8mm film. :oops:
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phuketrichard
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by phuketrichard » Mon Sep 15, 2014 2:25 pm

my dad was in the Korean conflict an when I was about 8 or so found his 8 mm films out of japan,
heavy stuff but pretty tame compared to the internet now
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
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Re: Old Codger Musings:

Post by indigo_design » Mon Sep 15, 2014 2:27 pm

And Littlewoods catalogues
Spoiler:
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