Tricky grammar question

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General Mackevili
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by General Mackevili » Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm

bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
" The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."

:hattip:
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Kammekor
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by Kammekor » Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:33 pm

General Mackevili wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm
bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
" The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."

:hattip:
I want boxing you
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JUDGEDREDD
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by JUDGEDREDD » Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:42 pm

Helping your uncle Jack, off a horse

Helping your uncle jack off a horse
bobsboots
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by bobsboots » Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:38 pm

General Mackevili wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm
bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
" The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."

:hattip:
Ah, the bars are where I use it the most, I guess.
Pigeon Khmer, we should call it.
Good tip.
khmerhamster
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by khmerhamster » Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:07 pm

bobsboots wrote:
General Mackevili wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm
bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
" The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."

:hattip:
Ah, the bars are where I use it the most, I guess.
Pigeon Khmer, we should call it.
Good tip.
Pidgin
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pidgin

Pigeon Khmer is something completely different (សត្វព្រាប)
explorer
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by explorer » Thu Jan 24, 2019 11:00 pm

bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
In English, it is common to use two comparatives in one statement such as " The harder you study, the easier it gets." or even just by using 'more' as in " The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
I have never heard Cambodians use a saying with an equivalent meaning.
General Mackevili wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."
Translated back into English this literally means: "learn a lot, know a lot."

They would be more likely to say:

រៀន ច្រើន ចេះ ច្រើន

reun jraan je jraan

which is the same as General Mackevili except for the third word.

dung means "know" (some information)

je means "know how to" (do something)

Translated back into English រៀន ច្រើន ចេះ ច្រើន means: "learn a lot, know how to do many things"
## I thought I knew all the answers, but they changed all the questions. ##
explorer
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by explorer » Thu Jan 24, 2019 11:25 pm

A common saying in Khmer is:

ចេះ មក ពី រៀន

មាន មក ពី រក

Which translated in English is:

To know how to comes from learning.

To have comes from earning.

I like to joke and have fun. I sometimes say:

ចេះ មក ពី រៀន

មិន ចេះ មក ពី ខ្ជិល រៀន

Which translated in English is:

To know how to comes from learning.

To not know how to comes from being too lazy to learn.

Most people have a good laugh, and tell me it is true.

A few people explain to me some people are to poor to study.
## I thought I knew all the answers, but they changed all the questions. ##
explorer
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by explorer » Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:06 am

The more you learn, the easier it gets.

This is true when learning the Khmer language. When you get to the point where you can understand some of what they say, and you can say some things back, you are repeatedly being reminded of those words, so it is easy to remember them. It is easy to learn additional words, and participate in even more of the conversation.
## I thought I knew all the answers, but they changed all the questions. ##
bobsboots
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by bobsboots » Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:24 am

khmerhamster wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:07 pm
bobsboots wrote:
General Mackevili wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm
bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
" The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."

:hattip:
Ah, the bars are where I use it the most, I guess.
Pigeon Khmer, we should call it.
Good tip.
Pidgin
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pidgin

Pigeon Khmer is something completely different (សត្វព្រាប)
Well, thanks for that contribution.
Why don't you look up the word 'pedantic ' on Wikipedia when you are there next.
khmerhamster
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Re: Tricky grammar question

Post by khmerhamster » Fri Jan 25, 2019 7:03 am

bobsboots wrote:
khmerhamster wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:07 pm
bobsboots wrote:
General Mackevili wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 6:22 pm
bobsboots wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:14 pm
" The more you study, the more you learn.
Does anyone know the Khmer version of this, if one exists ?
If you wanted it translated to Khmer bar talk, "Reun charan, dung charang."

:hattip:
Ah, the bars are where I use it the most, I guess.
Pigeon Khmer, we should call it.
Good tip.
Pidgin
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pidgin

Pigeon Khmer is something completely different (សត្វព្រាប)
Well, thanks for that contribution.
Why don't you look up the word 'pedantic ' on Wikipedia when you are there next.
It’s ok, I know what that one means.

It’s funny how we (myself included) are happy to be corrected in Khmer but if someone corrects our English we get irritated.
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