Moto for 6 months

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Bubba
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Moto for 6 months

Post by Bubba » Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:45 am

Hey!
So I am likely to work in Phnom Penh for about 6 months and was wandering about mobility.
I already saw that you don’t need a Cambodian license for anything uber 125cc anymore, so that’s great. Yet, I still have two questions:

1) I get that insurance won’t cover you if you don’t have a valid license, but what’s the situation for <125cc?

2) Would you recommend renting a scooter for a auch a period or buying used and then reselling? What cos S are we talking about?

Thank a lot for any advice! Cheers
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Jamie_Lambo
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:11 am

Bubba wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:45 am
Hey!
So I am likely to work in Phnom Penh for about 6 months and was wandering about mobility.
I already saw that you don’t need a Cambodian license for anything uber 125cc anymore, so that’s great. Yet, I still have two questions:

1) I get that insurance won’t cover you if you don’t have a valid license, but what’s the situation for <125cc?

2) Would you recommend renting a scooter for a auch a period or buying used and then reselling? What cos S are we talking about?

Thank a lot for any advice! Cheers
renting a bike will cost you about $80 per month, so $480 for the 6 months,
you can buy a 2nd hand Suzuki Step for around $300+ mark, a cheap Airblade will be $500+, semi-automatic Waves and Dreams you would be looking around $500-1000

renting would probably be cheaper in the long run during the 6months and you dont have to worry about the resale either
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timmydownawell
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by timmydownawell » Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:54 am

Bubba wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:45 am
Hey!
So I am likely to work in Phnom Penh for about 6 months and was wandering about mobility.
I already saw that you don’t need a Cambodian license for anything uber 125cc anymore, so that’s great. Yet, I still have two questions:

1) I get that insurance won’t cover you if you don’t have a valid license, but what’s the situation for <125cc?
Travel insurance (usually) requires you to comply with licencing laws in your home country. So even though Cambodia doesn't require a licence for <125cc, you'll need to have the appropriate licence from your own country in order to be covered.
No matter how much it rains, the dirt never washes away.
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chkwoot
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by chkwoot » Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:39 am

Have you ever driven a moto in Phnom Penh before?

Will your job require you to go to different locations in different parts of the city?

For only 6 months, I think you would be happier (and possibly wealthier) living near your job, and using motodops, tuk tuks, taxis, the city bus, and/or walking. Owning a bike here comes with many stressful "hidden" variables (some can be very expensive) that you can't yet see. You can always rent a bike for a few days first to get an idea.
Whatever you do, you should bring a good helmet, and moto lock.
I've been using one of these for 20 years! :Image

The first time you wear a stinky, borrowed, useless helmet, you'll regret not having your own.

Bikes get stolen. If a rental gets stolen (sometimes by the people you rented from), you'll have to reimburse the shop way more than the bike's worth. Always use your own, effective lock.

Both the lock and helmet (if they are of high quality) can be sold (possibly at a profit!) when you leave.
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rozzieoz
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by rozzieoz » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:05 am

Do you drive a moto at home?

If you’re not an experienced driver, Phnom Penh is not the place to learn.




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timmydownawell
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by timmydownawell » Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:12 pm

rozzieoz wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:05 am
Do you drive a moto at home?

If you’re not an experienced driver, Phnom Penh is not the place to learn.
I second this. I'm an experienced rider in Australia, but I don't fancy tackling PP's traffic. I leave the driving to the pros. Using a motodop or tuk tuk app is cheap and convenient and you don't have to worry about parking, theft, riding while drunk, etc.
No matter how much it rains, the dirt never washes away.
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rozzieoz
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by rozzieoz » Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:36 pm

timmydownawell wrote:
rozzieoz wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:05 am
Do you drive a moto at home?

If you’re not an experienced driver, Phnom Penh is not the place to learn.
I second this. I'm an experienced rider in Australia, but I don't fancy tackling PP's traffic. I leave the driving to the pros. Using a motodop or tuk tuk app is cheap and convenient and you don't have to worry about parking, theft, riding while drunk, etc.
Please please please take this advice.

We see too many pictures on Facebook of people splattered on the road.

But if, after all the very sound advice, you still decide to drive a moto in PP, for God’s sake wear a helmet!


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Bubba
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by Bubba » Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:55 pm

Wow thank you so much for all the answers! I used to drive a smaller engine moto back home and have driven scooters around Yogjakarta and on Bali, but I guess PP traffic is more stressfull. I planned on bringing my helmet from back home and I think I'll just rent a moto for a week, see how it's going and mainly rely on apps and walking for getting around.
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StroppyChops
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Re: Moto for 6 months

Post by StroppyChops » Mon Jun 11, 2018 5:18 pm

Bubba wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:55 pm
Wow thank you so much for all the answers! I used to drive a smaller engine moto back home and have driven scooters around Yogjakarta and on Bali, but I guess PP traffic is more stressfull. I planned on bringing my helmet from back home and I think I'll just rent a moto for a week, see how it's going and mainly rely on apps and walking for getting around.
I've also ridden motos (scooters) in those locations and there's no comparison.

Let me give you a real world example of a difference. A school-girl comes out into traffic from a side street, riding a Scoopy (it's always a Scoopy) without checking for a break in traffic, and is looking down "playing Facebook" or texting with one hand. You have to swerve violently (don't ever do this) or slam on the brakes to avoid hitting her. In this daily scenario, YOU are the problem because it's YOUR responsibility to be aware of traffic coming out from a side-street, even if they're unlicensed underaged idiots. If you hit her, you will end up paying both her and the local Khmer policeman money. When you slammed on the brakes, several people ran into the back of you, damaging their lights, and although you're not precisely to blame for this, they are still looking at you pathetically/hopefully as you really should give them some money. While the police on the corners of intersections have gone very quiet compared to two years ago, there's a new law that says foreigners can't transfer second-hand motos into their own name, and yet the law requires you to put all your vehicles in your name within a short period. So, if you get stopped by the corner police, you're automatically breaking a combination of laws that they feel empowers them to expect some of your money... seeing a pattern yet?

On the flip-side, expats who know the game rarely ever run into these problems, but it takes time to earn those stripes.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
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