American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

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General Mackevili
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by General Mackevili »

hanno wrote:
Jerry Atrick wrote: Mon Dec 25, 2017 3:29 pm Poor bastard.
The monkey?
Image
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by frank lee bent »

idiot brother in law was giving a big male macaque the odd dregs of beer in a can. boy he liked that.
then one day he handed him an empty can.
monkey very much and highly not amused.
i was first back in the house. i can move fast for an old fat guy.
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by Jerry Atrick »

Yeah, poor bastard, If I'm ever in that state I'd hope some humane chap would snap my neck and let me die with dignity.
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by Kuroneko »

Inroads have been made in the possible treatment of spinal cord injury over the past few years:

A dogged quest to fix broken spinal cords pays off with new hope for the paralyzed Usha Lee McFarling March 30, 2016

“Spinal cord injury may no longer mean a lifelong sentence of paralysis,” said Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, which is funding some of Edgerton’s research.

Using currents of electricity to jump-start injured spinal cords, Edgerton and his colleagues have given nearly a dozen paralyzed men, including a college baseball star and a polar explorer, the ability to move their own limbs. The men have been able to once again control their bladders and bowels, function sexually, stand upright — and with assistance, take steps.

The Reeve Foundation plans to test the device in 36 paralyzed men and women in hopes of speeding it into widespread clinical use for the tens of thousands of people paralyzed by spinal cord injury. The tests will likely focus on patients injured within the past two or three years.

Edgerton’s most important insight grew out of his refusal to accept the deeply held consensus that the spinal cord is merely a humble messenger, carrying signals between the brain and the limbs like a telephone line. Instead, he has come to see the spinal cord as smart — an organ that can, like the brain, process information, generate patterns, adapt, and learn, even after being injured.https://www.statnews.com/2016/03/30/par ... ment-ucla/
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by General Mackevili »


Kuroneko wrote:Inroads have been made in the possible treatment of spinal cord injury over the past few years:
I guess so. I thought it was odd when the article said he was paralyzed from the chest down, but might take 6 months before he could walk again.
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by cptrelentless »

Kuroneko wrote: Mon Dec 25, 2017 5:01 pm Inroads have been made in the possible treatment of spinal cord injury over the past few years:

A dogged quest to fix broken spinal cords pays off with new hope for the paralyzed Usha Lee McFarling March 30, 2016

“Spinal cord injury may no longer mean a lifelong sentence of paralysis,” said Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, which is funding some of Edgerton’s research.

Using currents of electricity to jump-start injured spinal cords, Edgerton and his colleagues have given nearly a dozen paralyzed men, including a college baseball star and a polar explorer, the ability to move their own limbs. The men have been able to once again control their bladders and bowels, function sexually, stand upright — and with assistance, take steps.

The Reeve Foundation plans to test the device in 36 paralyzed men and women in hopes of speeding it into widespread clinical use for the tens of thousands of people paralyzed by spinal cord injury. The tests will likely focus on patients injured within the past two or three years.

Edgerton’s most important insight grew out of his refusal to accept the deeply held consensus that the spinal cord is merely a humble messenger, carrying signals between the brain and the limbs like a telephone line. Instead, he has come to see the spinal cord as smart — an organ that can, like the brain, process information, generate patterns, adapt, and learn, even after being injured.https://www.statnews.com/2016/03/30/par ... ment-ucla/
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by timmydownawell »

I went to the monkey forest years ago, and had them jump on my shoulders and eat peanuts out of my hand.

I had no idea they carried such horrible diseases and I would never go near one now. Never mind being bitten. Herpes B fatal in humans. Bugger that.
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by John Bingham »

We used to keep marmosets when I was young, dealing with small monkeys like them gave me a respect for larger ones. An adult macaque is not so different than a pit-bull when it's annoyed, except that pit bulls can't climb trees or balconies or even throw bottles at you. 8-)
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Re: American Expat Paralyzed After Falling 33 Feet While Chasing a Monkey in Bali Who Stole His Hat

Post by hanno »

John Bingham wrote: Tue Dec 26, 2017 1:36 am We used to keep marmosets when I was young, dealing with small monkeys like them gave me a respect for larger ones. An adult macaque is not so different than a pit-bull when it's annoyed, except that pit bulls can't climb trees or balconies or even throw bottles at you. 8-)
And pit-bulls don't have 4 hands to hold on to you.
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