Cambodia's future transportation

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timmydownawell
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Re: Cambodia's future transportation

Post by timmydownawell » Sat May 13, 2017 9:12 pm

Duncan wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:28 pm
timmydownawell wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:04 pm
Username Taken wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 7:29 pm
^^ At least a couple of generations.
Yep, the Khmer Rouge set the country back many, many decades.

Generations of knowledge and skills lost that you can't replace by sending a single generation to uni.

Total bullshit. Anyone that wants to learn ,,, will learn with computers and modern technology it is much more easier to study and become a engineer ,, or whatever
than it has ever been in history. To say that someone or the population does not have the required skills because the previous generation of engineers ,, or whatever,, were killed,,is a total cop out.

As an example , would those engineers that were killed under Pol Pot be able to teach today's students how to do calculations and drawings on a computer. . No,,, because none of them would even know what a computer could do. So their deaths have no effect on the ability of any students to study engineering.

OK , my rants over.
Truly understanding something isn't just about having learnt it, it's about experience and the depth of knowledge that grows over time from that experience. These things take time. Having educators and mentors who have real, hands on experience will always be more beneficial than learning from Google.
No matter how much it rains, the dirt never washes away.
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StroppyChops
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Re: Cambodia's future transportation

Post by StroppyChops » Sat May 13, 2017 9:29 pm

Duncan wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:43 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:35 pm
Duncan wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:28 pm
OK , my rants over.
I give it 6/10 - clearly only minimal planning, and you could have used a broader vocabulary. Overall, not bad, room for improvement.
Having left school at the age of 15, with a learning disability, which was 55 years ago, I dont claim to be the best, smartest or brightest kid on CEO. I would be
more than happy with a 5/10
Then it's been a good day.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
ali baba
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Re: Cambodia's future transportation

Post by ali baba » Sun May 14, 2017 2:05 pm

Scarier than malaria.
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Username Taken
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Re: Cambodia's future transportation

Post by Username Taken » Sun May 14, 2017 4:43 pm

Duncan wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:28 pm
timmydownawell wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 8:04 pm
Username Taken wrote:
Sat May 13, 2017 7:29 pm
^^ At least a couple of generations.
Yep, the Khmer Rouge set the country back many, many decades.

Generations of knowledge and skills lost that you can't replace by sending a single generation to uni.
Total bullshit. Anyone that wants to learn ,,, will learn with computers and modern technology it is much more easier to study and become a engineer ,, or whatever
than it has ever been in history. To say that someone or the population does not have the required skills because the previous generation of engineers ,, or whatever,, were killed,,is a total cop out.

As an example , would those engineers that were killed under Pol Pot be able to teach today's students how to do calculations and drawings on a computer. . No,,, because none of them would even know what a computer could do. So their deaths have no effect on the ability of any students to study engineering.

OK , my rants over.
I think you're trying to over-simplify things there Duncan. I don't think it has much to do with 'wanting' to learn, but more about the way that affected Khmers can learn (or not).
If we go back to 1979/80, you have a bunch of people that haven't had the ability of freedom of speech, movement, expression, and so on for almost 4 years. Do you not think that this may have had some impact on their rehabilitation into a freer society. You have a whole bunch of people with ptsd and other mental health issues who can barely look after themselves or think for themselves. They then go on to have children which they don't really know how to look after.
I would guess that many of those who grew up in the 80's and 90's have limited critical thinking skills, and what you and I would consider to be obvious or just plain common sense would be totally alien to them.
Consider those people in the countryside that seem to just spend their entire day(s) sitting around doing nothing. Perhaps just waiting for someone to tell them what to do. Most would lack any idea of self-motivation.
Or, the time I gave my 20 year old bro-in-law an electric cable with a broken plug and asked him to cut off the broken plug and connect this new plug. The look on his face was like I had just asked him to split an atom or something. He had no idea what to do (or how simple the task really was).
Have you ever noticed the tuk tuk drivers in their 40's waiting outside shopping centers playing like children.
Have you ever wondered why so many poorer people like to spend their day sitting playing cards. Because that's what they've been brought up to do.
While things have improved a lot education and skill-wise over the past decade, I would venture to say that the vast majority of clever locals are Khmer-Chinese, Khmer-Vietnamese, and Khmer-<other>. Yes, there are some clever Khmer, but they often lack the critical/analytical skills that we take for granted.
I'll stick with my estimation of at least 2 generations.
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

https://BooksAboutCambodia.com
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StroppyChops
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Re: Cambodia's future transportation

Post by StroppyChops » Sun May 14, 2017 4:49 pm

Username Taken wrote:
Sun May 14, 2017 4:43 pm
Or, the time I gave my 20 year old bro-in-law an electric cable with a broken plug and asked him to cut off the broken plug and connect this new plug. The look on his face was like I had just asked him to split an atom or something. He had no idea what to do (or how simple the task really was).
Conversely, I had a clutch cable break on the little tuk-tuk, and had to leave my Khmer manager on the side of the road, assisted by half-a-dozen tuk-tuk driving helpers, to sort it while I shot out to the airport. We had factory-made replacement cables with the knurls factory fitted at the right length, but unfortunately the wrong length spare was with that particular tuk-tuk (read between the lines) and was too long. Rather than going and getting the correct cable from the house (10 minutes away) the gallery decided the new overlength cable had to be cut, because they'd never seen a factory-fitted one with knurls at both ends before, and so this is how we do this.

I literally had to threaten the manager with the sack if that cable ended up being cut (it was needed in the other, larger tuk-tuk) before I could walk away with any confidence that I wouldn't come back to an unresolved problem and a cut cable. It was patently clear that the collective Khmer were waiting for the dumb barang to leave so they could get on and do it the way it's always been done, and is therefore the only way it can be done.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
AE86
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Re: Cambodia's future transportation

Post by AE86 » Sun May 14, 2017 5:00 pm

This post above reminds me why I almost rebuild everything I own by myself. The latest "scandal" I've seen from machine shops here now is that they hone and polish the bore to the point of a near mirror finish vs. the required cross hatching because "sa-at".

Little surprise, the last bike I assembled for the family is a horrendous oil burner.
Reckless driving cucumber - 成
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