NGO Vs. Teaching

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VLayHo-ho-ho
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NGO Vs. Teaching

Postby VLayHo-ho-ho » Thu May 29, 2014 3:53 pm

NGO VS. Teaching

The battle between expats is more psychological than physical, although it has escalated to heights of obscenity in the past.
The expats in question work for different sectors, but in the end, most are working for a living.

In the red corner, earning an average of $1,500 a month working for a non-government organization, Action Jackson.
In the blue corner, earning between $7 to $20 an hour working for private or international schools, Scholastic Steve. The ring: Phnom Penh.
It’s as laughable a matter as the Hangover trilogy, but is rated highly in terms of opinion and debate.
What is the one thing they have in common? The best interests of the Cambodian society at heart. Smirk.

Driving around in a Mistubishi Pajero with blue plates doesn’t mean you can drive like everyone else.
Riding around on a Suzuki XR 250 without a helmet over-revving doesn’t mean you can act like everyone else.

I don’t mean to be a Moaning Mary here, but, push your ego to one side and think about your actions and the ripple effect.
As a member of staff in an NGO, doesn’t give anyone the right to drive the wrong side of the road and weave in and out of traffic, or even stare down at the locals that are blocking your way. As a member of staff in a school, doesn’t give anyone the right to
complain about the guys you see in these expensive SUVs and drink yourself under the table routinely every weekend. Both sectors
have a common interest, as stated above, and both divisions are very influential to the local society they “strive” to develop to a
western standard. Teachers complain about how shit their pay is, how they don’t get paid for public holidays, and how annoying and
lazy their students are. If that’s the worst of their problems, then I would hate to give them a job with a little more responsibility.
NGO workers (the majority over the last 5 years) place themselves on a golden pedestal which deludes their belief in their words and
actions as the right thing. I’ve had some complaining about the hostility towards them, the racism directed at them in certain
establishments and lack of respect in general.

I’m going to wrap this up by saying this: Doesn’t matter what you do here, or where you work. You’re here and you have your reasons
for not wanting to return to your respective country to work. That said, you should take a look at your actions and think about your
words carefully. Like footballers (soccer players), athletes, and any one upstanding pillar of the community, foreigners have an obligation
to help this country mature by being role-models when in view of the public.

Written by Criztian Velayo
There was no sarcasm or malice intended during the making of this post.
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Mrs Stroppy
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Re: NGO Vs. Teaching

Postby Mrs Stroppy » Thu May 29, 2014 6:15 pm

Very well written article and I agree with what you're saying.
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Re: NGO Vs. Teaching

Postby vladimir » Fri May 30, 2014 5:48 am

I think it's a very naive piece, myself. The writer has completely ignored two important parties in the equation:

1. School owners, who hamstring teachers at every turn, and then blame them for poor results.

2. The government, which is the reason many NGOs are required in the first place.

3. The writer has also ignored teachers who work for NGOs. You can be both.

I suggest the writer get some first-hand experience in both areas and then become the moral mouthpiece for said sectors.

What does the writer do, btw? Perhaps he could post about his profession so that we can follow his example?
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Re: NGO Vs. Teaching

Postby VLayHo-ho-ho » Fri May 30, 2014 7:47 am

The writer has taught at 4 different schools, as well as train teachers.
The writer has also volunteered for NGO work, became a project developer in one outside of Phnom Penh as well as being affiliated with a couple of others within the city.

It's not the writer's place to blame corruption and/or politics otherwise the blog would be extremely long and tedious and maybe draw the attention that the writer doesn't want.

Whilst it's appreciated that you(Vladimir) are entitled to your opinion, you should read the article as from a neutral/local perspective as it's not about all teachers and NGO workers. Just like not all politicians are corrupt.

Good day sir.
There was no sarcasm or malice intended during the making of this post.
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Re: NGO Vs. Teaching

Postby vladimir » Fri May 30, 2014 11:57 am

Mr Ho-ho

You raised the issue of beahviour of teachers and NGO workers, yet you wish to ignore the biggest influence on their environment?

Perhaps you are trying to molly-coddle the writer, I don't know, but I think I raised a very valid point. I also don't want to talk about corrupt owners or politicians at length, but to deny any mention of them at all in the equation?

And I'm not going to get myself into a willy-measuring contest about experience with your dear friend, but I've worked for two pretty highly regarded employers (internationally) in both the hospitality and tourism sectors and education (NGO/private).

The article focuses pretty much on the behaviour of two sectors toward each other, am I right?

I'm trying to give readers a perspective of both so that they understand where these people are coming from. No need to get so defensive.

Honest politicians? Are you on crack? ;)
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Re: NGO Vs. Teaching

Postby VLayHo-ho-ho » Fri May 30, 2014 2:47 pm

The same was done for the previous blog: Demonstrating for the cause.

As an alien, it's not within the author's rights (in my own views) to slate or tarnish or praise the hierarchy here, unless professionally told to do so. Even that would probably mean the end for the author.

Thanks for calling out the points you disagree on as it brings in a different perspective on how the article was written. As a poster previous commended the writing and agreed with the views. If others feel the same as you, it would certainly be welcomed with open arms as it gives room for debate at different angles.
There was no sarcasm or malice intended during the making of this post.


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