No more phoning your buddy in prison...

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Soi Dog
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No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby Soi Dog » Sun Jun 01, 2014 2:31 am

unless you use the land line.

...and the prison guards inside may have to wear tin foil hats...

PPP wrote:Prisoners all jammed up
Thu, 29 May 2014
Phak Seangly
In an effort to curb the widespread use of illegally smuggled cellphones in prisons, officials at Prey Sar prison a few months ago installed a cellphone signal jamming system, forcing inmates there to resort to prison-provided landlines, officials there said yesterday.

Sun Lean, chief of Prey Sar, yesterday confirmed the installation of the new system – which comprises a central tower and multiple transmitters – while declining to comment further. However, multiple guards, a prisoner and an NGO worker – all of whom declined to be named due to fear of reprisals – said from inside the prison yesterday that the new system had effectively ended the common practice of using smuggled cellphones.

A 28-year-old officer at the prison estimated yesterday that there was at least one smuggled phone per shared cell, a practice that has persisted despite the installation about a year ago of about 100 landline phones available for prisoners’ use.

Given the landlines' significantly higher price – about 38 cents per minute versus a few cents on a smuggled mobile phone – the phones went largely untouched until the installation of the jammers. “The system to block the phone signals operates around the clock,” he said.

A staffer from an NGO working to provide prisoners with health care said yesterday that prisoners had gone to great lengths to hide smuggled phones, with one inmate hollowing out a hole in a table to conceal his mobile.

However, the availability of the phones, he continued, at times proved problematic. “Prisoners are not allowed to call out whenever they wish. One prisoner called to threaten a victim from his cell. [Now] only 023 lines are available,” the health care worker said, referring to the numeric prefix for Phnom Penh landline numbers. “Other lines are blocked.”

One prisoner in his 20s who was working outside of his cell said the new system – in which prisoners must buy phone-credit cards, which are inserted into the landline phones during use – put an unfair burden on prisoners wishing to contact their families, given what he characterised as the prepaid cards’ exorbitant price.

“We need to buy PIN cards valued at $3, $5 or $10, [but] the $3 card could be [used up] within 10 minutes,” he said, noting that there were no other options. “We will be punished, and our mobile phone will be confiscated if the prison officers see it.”

At more than 30 cents a minute, the phones are more expensive than usual calls, even compared to phone stalls on the street. A vendor near the prison who provides phones to the public on a per-minute basis said yesterday that she charged only 500 riel (just over 10 cents) per minute.

Am Sam Ath, a technical adviser for rights group Licadho, acknowledged that phone use needed to be restricted inside prisons for security purposes, but nonetheless called on administrators to reconsider the rates for using the landlines.

“It makes it even more difficult for the poor, who cannot afford such a price.”

Cellphone jammers emit radio waves that “prevent the targeted device from establishing or maintaining a connection”, according to the US Federal Communications Commission.

However, guards inside the prison say they’re concerned for different reasons.

“I am working outside the cells, and I am OK, but the coworkers inside complain that they are having headaches due to the radiation system, which they really absorb,” one guard said.

The 28-year-old officer shared his concerns: “We are worried that it affects our health, like our hearts, muscles and nerves,” he said. “Our boss does not care about our health.”
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/p ... all-jammed" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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chkwoot
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby chkwoot » Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:41 am

Wow! Such cruel and inhumane punishment! I hope someone alerts the UN,The International Court of Justice, the WHO, and Somaly Mam!
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Digg3r
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby Digg3r » Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:51 am

chkwoot wrote:Wow! Such cruel and inhumane punishment! I hope someone alerts the UN,The International Court of Justice, the WHO, and Somaly Mam!
I think Steve Morrish should also be contacted for comment...
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chkwoot
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby chkwoot » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:17 am

Digg3r wrote:
chkwoot wrote:Wow! Such cruel and inhumane punishment! I hope someone alerts the UN,The International Court of Justice, the WHO, and Somaly Mam!
I think Steve Morrish should also be contacted for comment...
I believe he consulted on the installation of the jammers...for a small fee.
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vladimir
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby vladimir » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:48 am

Soi Dog wrote:unless you use the land line.

...and the prison guards inside may have to wear tin foil hats...
I doubt it, tin-foil hats are to protect the brain.
Oh, Carruthers, if you can hear me, wave your antennae.
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vladimir
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby vladimir » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:51 am

chkwoot wrote:Wow! Such cruel and inhumane punishment! I hope someone alerts the UN,The International Court of Justice, the WHO, and Somaly Mam!
Doubt we'll be hearing about any more cracks from her...
Oh, Carruthers, if you can hear me, wave your antennae.
Soi Dog
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby Soi Dog » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:58 am

Of course the prison guards are against the cell phone jamming. They will lose out on a steady source of phone/SIM card smuggling revenue.
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Kung-fu Hillbilly
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby Kung-fu Hillbilly » Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:17 am

And everyone laughed at the inmate breeding pidgeons.
Sorry, my fucking karma just ran over your dogma.
Soi Dog
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Re: No more phoning your buddy in prison...

Postby Soi Dog » Sun Jun 15, 2014 12:53 am

CambodiaDaily.com wrote:Phones Go Up In Flames at Prey Sar Prison
BY KANG SOTHEAR | JUNE 14, 2014
Prey Sar prison officials on Friday set fire to 1,705 mobile phones that had been confiscated from inmates there over the past three years.

Yin Kun, deputy chief of Prey Sar’s Correctional Center 1, said that the public burning of phones would remind prisoners that communicating privately via telephone with the outside world was prohibited.

“We have inspected every cell in the prison for three years until today to collect all these phones. Now, we have burned them,” Mr. Kun said, adding that the prison had recently ramped up its monitoring of inmates. “We have strengthened our work by increasing our monitoring of prisoners and cells to daily inspections in an effort to monitor activities that break internal rules, such as using mobile phones.”

The mobile phone burn-off comes about six months after Prey Sar hired a private company to install equipment to jam mobile phone signals, effectively ending that mode of communication.

“With the system, both prisoners and officials here cannot communicate through mobile phones,” Mr. Kun said. “Since we have had the mobile phone jamming system we have noticed that contact through mobile phones has reduced significantly.”

Am Sam Ath, technical supervisor at rights group Licadho, which closely monitors the country’s prisons, said the removal of mobile phones from Prey Sar was a positive move, but questioned whether the phones had to be destroyed.

“Those phones should have been transferred to state property, especially for use in government bodies such as the National Police, where there is a lack of communication,” Mr. Sam Ath said.

Mr. Sam Ath also raised questions about the environmental impact of burning more than 1,700 phones, which are made of toxic substances such as plastic and lead.

“Burning those phones in the area of the prison would have [negatively] impacted the environment and the health of the prisoners and officials there,” he said.
http://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/phone ... son-61422/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


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