Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

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Kuroneko
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Kuroneko » Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:03 pm

taabarang wrote:
Sun Dec 24, 2017 7:22 pm
Kuroneko, I know better than to argue with you and your expertise in the field. In part this due to the fact that I had a highly antibiotic resistant infection around my right ankle(Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) and most Khmer MDs.dismissed it as a staph infection and prescribed inappropriate antibiotics and told me to keep my foot raised to reduce the swelling iny leg.

Toake a long story short I finally found an MD who sent a specimen to a lab that identified it
Even then the first antibiotic (serum 2x a day) proved to be totally ineffective. The second one worked, but it was scary with 3 so called Khmer MDs insisting amputation was the answer. It was more complicated than that, but you get the gist.

Still, if I feel that I can identify the bacteria I will not hesitate to self prescribe. I think it is a matter of knowing your limitations.
I agree, if you are confident you know what you are doing and you have evidence to back it up go for it. One problem with some MD,s is that they are not up to speed with the latest treatments. In Australia MD's must do CME or continuous medical education, which consist of a series of education "modules" they undertake yearly to keep their knowledge current. I used to teach evidence based medicine to help keep MDs up with the basic treatment regimens. The issue is when MDs are working abroad for many years or when MD's are locally qualified, how many rely on what they learned at "medical school" and how many are keeping their knowledge up to date. The answer is I don't know, but it is a worry. I know some here that are very good, but the rest I really cant say.

As you say you had issues with MD's that may have been suggesting treatment that was inappropriate or out of date for example. This is a problem here. If I have a problem I will look up the best recognized treatment and if possible go for that. I have a few MD's and a surgeon that I know and for most things I feel I can trust their judgement. Just to be clear incorrect diagnosis is a problem even in developed countries. In the US it is estimated that the third leading cause of death is medical mistakes.

"A new study in the latest edition of BMJ (May 4, 2016) suggesting most medical errors go unobserved, at least in the official record. In fact, the study, from doctors at Johns Hopkins, suggests medical errors may kill more people than lower respiratory diseases like emphysema and bronchitis do. That would make these medical mistakes the third leading cause of death in the United States. That would place medical errors right behind heart disease and cancer. "http://edition.cnn.com/2016/05/03/healt ... index.html
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Username Taken » Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:43 pm

At the end of the day they are all just practicing medicine.
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

https://BooksAboutCambodia.com
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Kuroneko
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Kuroneko » Mon Dec 25, 2017 12:11 am

Username Taken wrote:
Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:43 pm
At the end of the day they are all just practicing medicine.
Of course but is it not in our best interest to ensure that this happens with the minimal of mistakes.
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Jack.R. » Mon Dec 25, 2017 11:49 am

Gumby wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 7:35 pm
Pay $200 a month to a qualified pharmacist and you can hang their certificate on your wall and start dishing out pills.
They changed the law this year. anyone working in a pharmacy now needs to be a pharmacist or at least they must have passed a 300hours + exams course which gives the the title of assistant pharmacist. The training cost about 600$ and if they find someone selling medicines without it the fine is really high and the police gets to keep most of it. This training is very popular among nurses now as it offers decent job opportunities.
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Abc123 » Mon Dec 25, 2017 12:17 pm

The only thing the Ministry has successfully banned from the pharmacies here is speed. Because they make too much money out of it.
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Duncan » Mon Dec 25, 2017 12:24 pm

Jack.R. wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 11:49 am
Gumby wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 7:35 pm
Pay $200 a month to a qualified pharmacist and you can hang their certificate on your wall and start dishing out pills.
They changed the law this year. anyone working in a pharmacy now needs to be a pharmacist or at least they must have passed

a 300hours + exams course which gives the the title of assistant pharmacist.

The training cost about 600$ and if they find someone selling medicines without it the fine is really high and the police gets to keep most of it. This training is very popular among nurses now as it offers decent job opportunities.


300 hours means nothing if the meds they are handing out are imported from other countries ,, with writing in Thai, Vietnamese , French or even English which they dont understand.
Cambodia,,,, Don't fall in love with her.
Like the spoilt child she is, she will not be happy till she destroys herself from within and breaks your heart.
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Kuroneko
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Kuroneko » Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:08 pm

Duncan wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 12:24 pm
Jack.R. wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 11:49 am
Gumby wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 7:35 pm
Pay $200 a month to a qualified pharmacist and you can hang their certificate on your wall and start dishing out pills.
They changed the law this year. anyone working in a pharmacy now needs to be a pharmacist or at least they must have passed

a 300hours + exams course which gives the the title of assistant pharmacist.

The training cost about 600$ and if they find someone selling medicines without it the fine is really high and the police gets to keep most of it. This training is very popular among nurses now as it offers decent job opportunities.
300 hours means nothing if the meds they are handing out are imported from other countries ,, with writing in Thai, Vietnamese , French or even English which they dont understand.
You're making an assumption here, that someone that's finished year 12 and then done study in pharmacology, not only cant identify and and prescribe the requisite drug but cant read English or at least the generic drug name, which is not usually the case. I realise that at present many people working in pharmacies are clueless, but these aren't the ones that have completed an appropriate course of study, and in any event there is usually someone in the pharmacy to whom they can refer.
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Duncan
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by Duncan » Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:54 pm

Kuroneko wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:08 pm
Duncan wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 12:24 pm
Jack.R. wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 11:49 am
Gumby wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 7:35 pm
Pay $200 a month to a qualified pharmacist and you can hang their certificate on your wall and start dishing out pills.
They changed the law this year. anyone working in a pharmacy now needs to be a pharmacist or at least they must have passed

a 300hours + exams course which gives the the title of assistant pharmacist.

The training cost about 600$ and if they find someone selling medicines without it the fine is really high and the police gets to keep most of it. This training is very popular among nurses now as it offers decent job opportunities.
300 hours means nothing if the meds they are handing out are imported from other countries ,, with writing in Thai, Vietnamese , French or even English which they dont understand.
You're making an assumption here,


that someone that's finished year 12 and then done study in pharmacology, not only cant identify and and prescribe the requisite drug but cant read English or at least the generic drug name, which is not usually the case. I realise that at present many people working in pharmacies are clueless, but these aren't the ones that have completed an appropriate course of study, and in any event there is usually someone in the pharmacy to whom they can refer.


You're damn right there. Every minuet of the day, from the time I wake up in the morning.
Cambodia,,,, Don't fall in love with her.
Like the spoilt child she is, she will not be happy till she destroys herself from within and breaks your heart.
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Re: Ministry bans selling antibiotics without prescription

Post by CEOCambodiaNews » Tue Dec 26, 2017 10:33 am

City governor tackles illegal medication sales
26 December 2017
The Phnom Penh governor said he would crack down on pharmacies who do not follow the laws of the Health Ministry.

Governor Khuong Sreng vowed to ban practices such as the selling of medication without a license and the dissemination of illegal medications, and to search and destroy counterfeit, prohibited, low-quality or expired medications.

He made this statement as he attended a ceremony to give certificates to members of the Association of Cambodian Pharmacists...

Mr Sameth said that, according to research, there are no places selling illegal medications in Phnom Penh today.
“There are some places where medications are still sold without proper authorizations, but we fine these business owners,” he said.

He said that fines in the second half of 2017 totaled nearly $25,000 for the ministry, usually from crimes related to the dissemination or sale of medications banned by the ministry, which have been deleted from registration.
http://www.khmertimeskh.com/5098125/cit ... ion-sales/
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