Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Breaking news from Cambodia can be found here. CEO often finds Khmer news and translates it into English for our readers if it is interesting to expats, locals, Cambodians living abroad and anyone who wants to stay informed of the latest local and international news stories about Cambodia and our neighbors in South East Asia. There are many sources for Khmer news articles and they can all be found here in one place. Most of the media comes out of Phnom Penh, Siem Reap or Sihanoukville, but we cover national Cambodian news from all provinces.
User avatar
CEOCambodiaNews
Expatriate
Posts: 44255
Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:13 am
Reputation: 2737
Location: CEO Newsroom in Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Contact:
Cambodia

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by CEOCambodiaNews »

MRC Sees ‘Critical Situation’ as Reverse Mekong Flow into Tonle Sap Delayed
AKP Phnom Penh, July 28, 2020 --

The Mekong River Commission (MRC) warned Tuesday that the delayed reversal of the Tonle Sap River could adversely affect fish spawning and agricultural production.

In a weekly situation report, the MRC’s Regional Flood and Drought Management Centre in Phnom Penh said water levels were below long-term averages in Stung Treng, Kratie, Kampong Cham and Neak Luong on the Mekong River.

Water levels at Chaktomuk and Koh Khel on the Bassac River and at Phnom Penh Port and Prekdam on the Tonle Sap River were also below their long-term averages.

As of Monday, the annual reversal of the Tonle Sap River — caused by the volume of water flowing downstream along the Mekong — had “not happened yet,” the report said.

Low inflows from the Mekong and less rainfall in sub-catchments around the Tonle Sap could be the reason for the “critical situation” of the lake, it said.

“More than half of the annual inflow to the lake originates from the Mekong mainstream,” the report said.

“Thus, flow alterations in the mainstream would have direct impacts on the Tonle Sap water levels and hydrology,” it added.

"The low volume flow of the Tonle Sap Lake could affect the surrounding floodplain for fish spawning in the flooded forest,” the report said.

It could also lead to a "water shortage for agricultural production" in the area.

The center said lower water levels along the Mekong mainstream in June and July reflected “less rainfall” from catchments and a prolonged El Nino phenomenon.

At the same time, low inflows from upstream since June reflected “reservoir operation and water retention from upstream on the mainstream and tributaries.”

The report noted that tributaries in central Laos along with those in southern Laos and northern Cambodia accounted for more than 40 percent of Mekong flows. China contributes about 16 percent of the flows, it said.

By Sao Da
AKP
Cambodia Expats Online: Bringing you breaking news from Cambodia before you read it anywhere else!

Have a story or an anonymous news tip for CEO? Need advertising? CONTACT US

Cambodia Expats Online is the most popular community in the country. JOIN TODAY

Follow CEO on social media:

Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Google+
Instagram
whatwat
Expatriate
Posts: 748
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 12:30 pm
Reputation: 188
Hong Kong

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by whatwat »

I’m hoping it’s just late and will extend further than normal.

Aren’t the fisher folk mostly (all?) Vietnamese? Why is that?
Don’t listen to Chinese whispers.
User avatar
John Bingham
Expatriate
Posts: 9406
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:26 pm
Reputation: 5012
Burkina Faso

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by John Bingham »

whatwat wrote: Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:35 am Aren’t the fisher folk mostly (all?) Vietnamese? Why is that?
Many of them are Vietnamese, but there are a lot of Chams and Khmers who fish too. I believe it's because Khmers traditionally preferred farming, and also because most Vietnamese are stateless so have to work in informal sectors to survive. Living in floating villages and on boats also avoids restrictions on owning land. Many fishermen have been relocated to dry land or deported in recent years.
Silence, exile, and cunning.
User avatar
CEOCambodiaNews
Expatriate
Posts: 44255
Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:13 am
Reputation: 2737
Location: CEO Newsroom in Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Contact:
Cambodia

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by CEOCambodiaNews »

As the Mekong delta washes away, homes and highways are being lost
Upstream dams are blocking the sediment that nourishes the Mekong delta, while erosion and sand miners take what remains
Michael Tatarski
March 10, 2021

One night two years ago, Lam Thi Le and Nguyen Van Thuong heard loud cracks coming from their neighbours’ riverfront home. The neighbours left, and a day later half of their house collapsed into the broad Tien River as the land beneath it slid away.

The shell of the remaining half sits precariously on the jagged river bank. Le and Thuong live a few metres inland. Nearby, workers use a machine to pack rocks onto the riverbank, laying the foundation for a concrete embankment designed to prevent further erosion.

This community in Vietnam’s Dong Thap province is not unique. The Tien is one of the Mekong River’s main branches flowing down from Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh. In recent years, dams built upstream in China, Laos and Cambodia and local sand mining have starved delta provinces such as Dong Thap of sediment, causing once-stable land to erode.
With upstream dams cutting off the flow of sediment, and rampant sand mining in both Vietnam and Cambodia, once stable land on the Mekong delta is now being washed away.

The Mekong’s average sediment load used to be 160 million tonnes, according to Marc Goichot, WWF’s Lead for Freshwater in the Asia Pacific, but the construction of dams on the river has reduced this by almost 80%.

“Dams and sand mining are working in a cumulative manner,” Goichot said. “Sand mining is making the impact of dams not only worse but much faster. We know that the impacts of the Aswan dam in Egypt took 50 years to reach the Nile River delta, and in the Mekong it’s much faster.”

Vietnam’s agriculture ministry estimates that the delta, which produces much of the country’s rice, aquacultural goods and fruit, worth billions of US dollars, loses 500 hectares of land per year to erosion.
https://chinadialogue.net/en/energy/as- ... eing-lost/
Cambodia Expats Online: Bringing you breaking news from Cambodia before you read it anywhere else!

Have a story or an anonymous news tip for CEO? Need advertising? CONTACT US

Cambodia Expats Online is the most popular community in the country. JOIN TODAY

Follow CEO on social media:

Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Google+
Instagram
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 4784
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2812
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by SternAAlbifrons »

"For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind."

Lucky for Covid, lol.
We are going to need all the training we can get. and quick.

Hang on to your hats, Folks - this pandemic ain't got nothin' on eco-systems collapsing all 'round.
User avatar
Phnom Poon
Expatriate
Posts: 1795
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 pm
Reputation: 887
Kiribati

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by Phnom Poon »

it's easy to be complacent
if you only get the media's dismiss-able showtime version of what's going on
but there have been some genuinely, extremely worrying papers coming out over just the last couple of years

.

monstra mihi bona!
User avatar
KTabi
Expatriate
Posts: 331
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2021 7:29 am
Reputation: 90
Location: The Ground
Japan

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by KTabi »

This is a horrible tragedy, aren't many of the fishermen in the areas drying up essentially going to starve?
:thumb:
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 4784
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2812
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by SternAAlbifrons »

China, Laos and Thailand have stolen 80% of Cambodia's protein.
and PS, it cannot afford to buy super-expensive import substitutes.
Look for a decline is Cambodians physical stature over the next couple of generations << take that literally.

Oooops....
Something about Kh Okhnas and their sand pillaging developments should be in the charge-sheet too
and the Koh Kong dams and sand mining

"Crimes Against Future Generations"
******* ****s
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 4784
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2812
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by SternAAlbifrons »

John Bingham wrote: Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:59 am
whatwat wrote: Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:35 am Aren’t the fisher folk mostly (all?) Vietnamese? Why is that?
Many of them are Vietnamese, but there are a lot of Chams and Khmers who fish too. I believe it's because Khmers traditionally preferred farming, and also because most Vietnamese are stateless so have to work in informal sectors to survive. Living in floating villages and on boats also avoids restrictions on owning land. Many fishermen have been relocated to dry land or deported in recent years.
You can't have 10's of thousands of economic opportunists floating up the river from Vietnam every high season and living on the lake like this either - not on the most important and sensitive protein source in the country. Or just staying on.
This cohort is definitely a big part of the equation too.
Image
Image
Image
Anchor Moy
Expatriate
Posts: 11971
Joined: Wed May 28, 2014 11:37 pm
Reputation: 2955
Tokelau

Re: Mekong River dying a slow but certain death

Post by Anchor Moy »

^ Those bloody birds. :whip:
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ali baba, Apollo91881, Chad Sexington, Jamie_Lambo, johnny lightning, LoukBongThom, lurcio, Majestic-12 [Bot], paul2d, Robwalk, ron100, simon43, Soriya, Tommie and 618 guests