Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

This is a part of our Cambodia forums to chat about anything Cambodia-related. This discussion forum is at the top of our site because it's usually the busiest part of the expat community chatter with random topics on just about everything, including expat life, Khmer politics, Cambodian blogs we have or have come across, or whatever else our members want to discuss. Whether you're an expatriate, tourist, Cambodian or random traveler just passing through South East Asia, you are welcome to talk about anything or start new topics yourselves.
User avatar
Brody
Expatriate
Posts: 4502
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 12:07 pm
Reputation: 4167
Cambodia

Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by Brody » Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:58 am

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/sla ... 09677.html


Sharp intelligence and a ferocious will to survive helped Dr. Haing Ngor elude death when the nefarious Khmer Rouge swept through Cambodia in the 1970s, imprisoning and killing perceived enemies of the brutal Pol Pot regime.

After being tortured, sent to work camps and watching hundreds of people get put to death, Ngor escaped to the United States in 1980, settling in Los Angeles and working with refugees.

His life took another fateful turn when he landed a lead role in the 1984 movie The Killing Fields, about the Cambodian genocide he’d survived. In 1985, Ngor won an Oscar for that film, and during his speech for Best Supporting Actor, he thanked the Warner Bros. studio for letting “the world know what happened in my country.”

With his newfound fame and international platform, Ngor became an outspoken critic of the Pol Pot regime that had unleashed horror upon millions of innocent people, including Ngor’s beloved wife, who had died in his arms.

In 1996, when Ngor was gunned down in a Los Angeles alley outside his apartment, many were left to wonder: Was the shooting a random act, or a revenge hit from U.S. affiliates of the deadly Khmer Rouge?

These questions and more are examined in the next episode of People Magazine Investigates, airing at 10 p.m. on Monday on Investigation Discovery. An exclusive clip is above.

The Los Angeles Police Department began investigating Ngor’s murder, believing it could have been a political assassination.

Whoever shot Ngor had left his Mercedes – as well as $2900 of cash in his jacket and $800 in his pants pocket – behind. But the case took a new turn when Ngor’s niece asked for the whereabouts of two of his most prized possessions: a Rolex watch and a locket that held a picture of his beloved wife.

“He never, ever took it off,” now-retired Det. Sgt. John Garcia of the LAPD Robbery-Homicide Division says of the necklace, which detectives were able to prove Ngor was wearing on the night of the murder.

What other clues would be laid out in the investigation of Ngor’s tragic killing?

People Magazine Investigates: Killing Fields in the City of Angels airs Monday, December2, at 10 p.m. ET on Investigation Discovery.
Anthony's Weiner
Expatriate
Posts: 1634
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:00 am
Reputation: 1076
United States of America

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by Anthony's Weiner » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:26 am

The Life and Strange Death of the Khmer Rouge Survivor Who Won an Oscar, Then Got Murdered
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/av39 ... nning-role

Three Charged with Murder, Robbery in Slaying of Actor Haing S. Ngor
https://apnews.com/ed48eae3306b7c85757f951bb761f332



Fascinating story

Prosecutors argued they killed Ngor because, after handing over his gold Rolex watch willingly, he refused to give them a locket which contained a photo of his deceased wife, My-Huoy. Defence attorneys suggested the murder was a politically motivated killing carried out by sympathizers of the Khmer Rouge but offered no evidence to support this theory. Kang Kek Iew, a former Khmer Rouge official on trial in Cambodia, claimed in November 2009 that Ngor was murdered on Pol Pot's orders, but U.S. investigators did not find him credible.
All of the defendants were found guilty on April 16, 1998, the same day Pol Pot's death was confirmed in Cambodia. Tak Sun Tan was sentenced to 56 years to life; Indra Lim to 26 years to life; and Jason Chan to life without parole
jovial fucher
Expatriate
Posts: 135
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:35 am
Reputation: 50
Andorra

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by jovial fucher » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:43 am

Like a true Khmer, he's got the 'go-away' wad in his pocket and the real money in his jacket. :plus1:
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 3659
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2164
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:51 am

"...next episode of People Magazine Investigates..."

Thank God, we are finally going to get a serious investigation.
THE TRUTH has been covered up by the dastardly FAKE NEWS cabal for far too long.

NEWS FAKE NEWS FAKE NEWS FAKE NEWS FAKE
:twisted: :angry: :twisted: :flasher1: :twisted: :bootyshake: :twisted: :mrgreen: :twisted: %) :twisted: :crazy: :twisted:
bossho
Expatriate
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:03 pm
Reputation: 45
American Samoa

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by bossho » Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:20 pm

Brody wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:58 am
https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/sla ... 09677.html


Sharp intelligence and a ferocious will to survive helped Dr. Haing Ngor elude death when the nefarious Khmer Rouge swept through Cambodia in the 1970s, imprisoning and killing perceived enemies of the brutal Pol Pot regime.

After being tortured, sent to work camps and watching hundreds of people get put to death, Ngor escaped to the United States in 1980, settling in Los Angeles and working with refugees.

His life took another fateful turn when he landed a lead role in the 1984 movie The Killing Fields, about the Cambodian genocide he’d survived. In 1985, Ngor won an Oscar for that film, and during his speech for Best Supporting Actor, he thanked the Warner Bros. studio for letting “the world know what happened in my country.”

With his newfound fame and international platform, Ngor became an outspoken critic of the Pol Pot regime that had unleashed horror upon millions of innocent people, including Ngor’s beloved wife, who had died in his arms.

In 1996, when Ngor was gunned down in a Los Angeles alley outside his apartment, many were left to wonder: Was the shooting a random act, or a revenge hit from U.S. affiliates of the deadly Khmer Rouge?

These questions and more are examined in the next episode of People Magazine Investigates, airing at 10 p.m. on Monday on Investigation Discovery. An exclusive clip is above.

The Los Angeles Police Department began investigating Ngor’s murder, believing it could have been a political assassination.

Whoever shot Ngor had left his Mercedes – as well as $2900 of cash in his jacket and $800 in his pants pocket – behind. But the case took a new turn when Ngor’s niece asked for the whereabouts of two of his most prized possessions: a Rolex watch and a locket that held a picture of his beloved wife.

“He never, ever took it off,” now-retired Det. Sgt. John Garcia of the LAPD Robbery-Homicide Division says of the necklace, which detectives were able to prove Ngor was wearing on the night of the murder.

What other clues would be laid out in the investigation of Ngor’s tragic killing?

People Magazine Investigates: Killing Fields in the City of Angels airs Monday, December2, at 10 p.m. ET on Investigation Discovery.
A good story for to follow but hard to stomach that it was a hit, in Long Beach I believe is where it happened and the cops show up quickly when there are gunshots, more than likely that they ran out of time and split. Questions remain and we shall see what is dredged up- unfortunately for all the whole topic makes the KOW look worse than it actually is and the regime, horrible as it was, has been consistently over inflated in the amount of murders they actually did. I am no KR apologist by any stretch but nowadays one has to either know where to look for more accurate numbers from that especially nasty almost 4 years they KR had the KOW. Western academics are all on the gravy train of the mid left and cannot hear or write anything that does not concur with gross overinflation of that period.
The biggest crime of the KR outside of normal civil war stuff like political hits of perceived enemies was the re engineering of centuries old irrigation and farming systems ala Mao Tse Tung and his f ups of the late 50's that led the deaths of tens of millions, they just f'd up what had worked for generations because they thought they must know better than the poor illiterate locals how and when the water comes and when and where to plant the seed. The KR just fell prey to Chinese know it alls pre 75 and during the regime. Then the rest is mostly lost because there are few who have the integrity and local knowledge to honestly say anything for lack of profit. This post is especially important because the UN Tribunal cost like $200,000,000 ?! WTF. What good came out of that? The UN is a profiteer and job seeking lot of pigs for the most part. Bu all the mid lefties act so righteous cannot wait to seize the high ground while living in a villa with 3 full times staff, fat salaries, benefits?! Holy Jesus H Christ these people are set. One thing I like about our boy in the Oval now is utter gut ripping remarks about the UN.
Isaanbarang
Expatriate
Posts: 247
Joined: Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:19 am
Reputation: 165
Australia

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by Isaanbarang » Sat Nov 30, 2019 2:53 pm

bossho wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:20 pm
Brody wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:58 am
https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/sla ... 09677.html


Sharp intelligence and a ferocious will to survive helped Dr. Haing Ngor elude death when the nefarious Khmer Rouge swept through Cambodia in the 1970s, imprisoning and killing perceived enemies of the brutal Pol Pot regime.

After being tortured, sent to work camps and watching hundreds of people get put to death, Ngor escaped to the United States in 1980, settling in Los Angeles and working with refugees.

His life took another fateful turn when he landed a lead role in the 1984 movie The Killing Fields, about the Cambodian genocide he’d survived. In 1985, Ngor won an Oscar for that film, and during his speech for Best Supporting Actor, he thanked the Warner Bros. studio for letting “the world know what happened in my country.”

With his newfound fame and international platform, Ngor became an outspoken critic of the Pol Pot regime that had unleashed horror upon millions of innocent people, including Ngor’s beloved wife, who had died in his arms.

In 1996, when Ngor was gunned down in a Los Angeles alley outside his apartment, many were left to wonder: Was the shooting a random act, or a revenge hit from U.S. affiliates of the deadly Khmer Rouge?

These questions and more are examined in the next episode of People Magazine Investigates, airing at 10 p.m. on Monday on Investigation Discovery. An exclusive clip is above.

The Los Angeles Police Department began investigating Ngor’s murder, believing it could have been a political assassination.

Whoever shot Ngor had left his Mercedes – as well as $2900 of cash in his jacket and $800 in his pants pocket – behind. But the case took a new turn when Ngor’s niece asked for the whereabouts of two of his most prized possessions: a Rolex watch and a locket that held a picture of his beloved wife.

“He never, ever took it off,” now-retired Det. Sgt. John Garcia of the LAPD Robbery-Homicide Division says of the necklace, which detectives were able to prove Ngor was wearing on the night of the murder.

What other clues would be laid out in the investigation of Ngor’s tragic killing?

People Magazine Investigates: Killing Fields in the City of Angels airs Monday, December2, at 10 p.m. ET on Investigation Discovery.
One thing I like about our boy in the Oval now is utter gut ripping remarks about the UN.
https://images.app.goo.gl/aqWtQDvNEmaGBAx59
bong.kuit
Expatriate
Posts: 168
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2014 11:16 pm
Reputation: 68

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by bong.kuit » Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:03 pm

bossho wrote:
Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:20 pm
A good story for to follow but hard to stomach that it was a hit, in Long Beach I believe is where it happened and the cops show up quickly when there are gunshots, more than likely that they ran out of time and split. Questions remain and we shall see what is dredged up- unfortunately for all the whole topic makes the KOW look worse than it actually is and the regime, horrible as it was, has been consistently over inflated in the amount of murders they actually did. I am no KR apologist by any stretch but nowadays one has to either know where to look for more accurate numbers from that especially nasty almost 4 years they KR had the KOW. Western academics are all on the gravy train of the mid left and cannot hear or write anything that does not concur with gross overinflation of that period.
The biggest crime of the KR outside of normal civil war stuff like political hits of perceived enemies was the re engineering of centuries old irrigation and farming systems ala Mao Tse Tung and his f ups of the late 50's that led the deaths of tens of millions, they just f'd up what had worked for generations because they thought they must know better than the poor illiterate locals how and when the water comes and when and where to plant the seed. The KR just fell prey to Chinese know it alls pre 75 and during the regime. Then the rest is mostly lost because there are few who have the integrity and local knowledge to honestly say anything for lack of profit. This post is especially important because the UN Tribunal cost like $200,000,000 ?! WTF. What good came out of that? The UN is a profiteer and job seeking lot of pigs for the most part. Bu all the mid lefties act so righteous cannot wait to seize the high ground while living in a villa with 3 full times staff, fat salaries, benefits?! Holy Jesus H Christ these people are set. One thing I like about our boy in the Oval now is utter gut ripping remarks about the UN.
You sound seriously misinformed. Michael Vickery, a very left-leaning expert on Cambodia states some of the lowest numbers, iirc around a million deaths. It is not "normal civil war stuff" to eradicate whole families because of one member being a perceived CIA and KGB spy at once. While a part of the KR ideology definitely had Chinese influence, there are no signs that they had much to do with the killings between 75 and 79. There is a recent book about it, can't remember the name of it atm. A big part of the KR ideology was about nationalism, self-sufficiency and "making Cambodia great again". This longing for past greatness is very often a factor in genocide.

Better read a few books before you spout such nonsense. But as your generalizing and parroting of prejudices reeks of the uneducated that Trump loves so much, chances of you doing so are probably pretty small.
bossho
Expatriate
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:03 pm
Reputation: 45
American Samoa

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by bossho » Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:22 am

Sorry about getting so off im on self and not on your worthy and interesting topic. Ngor's death covered by People magazine now? Now, there's a source to consider.

Dr. Vickery, RIP, remains a source through his words and writing. I don't agree that I am not so well informed.

I had the honor to sit with Dr Vickery after I read him and a couple of other times since he was a colleague to my occasional roomie a nd ask him my questions about the regime years and what else he knew as I had doubts about the whole story and had yet to read his later work. Not all of his thoughts made it to the page, so his later work did not contain what he said to me. He was very direct in person over coffee or whatever. So, yeah, via Vickery himself "some things were normal for a civil war" and yes its was poor judgement on my part for a new guy to the board to write anything so impertinent to your topic. One thing though and this is straight from Vickery, large sections of the KOW were relatively unscathed the entire period and even his quoted numbers in early work he said to me in 2010 was way off..

So, I will keep the esoteric knowledge I have via Dr. Vickery and others out of this one. I will also leave out the other Phd. authored books and dissertations I 've read bolstering my words out of this. Strange but true, differing opinions on the regime years are now extremely hard to find. It's almost as if there is a big giant censor in the sky and what we hoi polloi are fed we eat. I know that sounds Trumpy and like I am a creep from the far right but I am not.

I feel only frustration at the Western STV (you must know what that is since you read MV) of this region and the continued to this day Western money grab and self promoting mid left bourgeoisie approach to the very serious and complicated events in this region. No one seems to care about the tough facts of life because admitting you accept them means you are complicit? I don't get it but I do get that some Western academics and some in the West has profited off of the tragedy yet take the high ground morally.

A Trump guy I am not, an anti UN KR Tribunal waste of money/production/peculiarities in the trial critic I am. I only say that when Trump rips on the UN I love it.

Anyway, I am sorry to have gone off the way I did and hope this clears it up a bit. Next time I hit submit I will make sure I am on topic and not just ripping to make myself feel better. I am out of touch with my online self I guess you could say, seriously, I have no experience at being on one of these boards and there are protocols to it that I am simply unaware of.
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 3659
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2164
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:57 am

And the sole source for the "the Kr done it" story -
Dadah...
Spoiler:
Kaing Guek Eav
AHH HAhahaha
Hilarius
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 3659
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2164
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Was Slaying of Oscar-Winning The Killing Fields Actor a Random Act or a Political Revenge Hit?

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:31 pm

bossho wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:22 am
Sorry..
No sweat

So, I will keep the esoteric knowledge I have via Dr. Vickery and others out of this one. I will also leave out the other Phd. authored books and dissertations
Don't leave it out, as you say below, we need more informed viewpoints.
Maybe just don't tie your arguments to other issues - or you will lose people, and also not make your point clear.

eg Trump/UN gravy trains/rich leftie conspiracy plots - should probably only be mentioned if you can be really clear on it's relevance to this issue. or it just becomes a rant. (ps, i'm guilty of that too, in other ways)

Strange but true, differing opinions on the regime years are now extremely hard to find.
It's almost as if there is a big giant censor in the sky and what we hoi polloi are fed we eat.

Yep, I am not pushing any particular line myself but we all know that orthodoxy can be a bit totalitarian in its interpretations. So, important that we discuss this stuff rationally and look at all credible evidence.

No one seems to care about the tough facts of life because admitting you accept them means you are complicit?
I don't get it but I do get that some Western academics and some in the West has profited off of the tragedy yet take the high ground morally.

Agree (-with that statement but not necessarily your viewpoint)

Sorry Boss, i hope you can understand the format of my response ^^^ and what i am trying to say
I also would like to see more good open discussion on this subject.
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: beaker, cautious colin, Deefer, Google [Bot], hmmmokay, jjy, LIVIDZX, lurcio, pauloxleyisland, phuketrichard, wendyaspinall and 430 guests