Truck vs Not a Truck

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hanno
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by hanno » Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:56 am

davegorman wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:48 am
hanno wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:21 am
They are lorries, not trucks.
Lorries are under 7.5t trucks above that?
Not sure but when I was a school boy at school in Kenya, we certainly never learned the word "truck". They were all called lorries.
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Seasquatch
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by Seasquatch » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:25 am

Username Taken wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:05 am
Seasquatch wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:12 pm

Maybe I understand the Aussies's confusion after all didn't you guys call these vans???

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No. That's a shaggin' wagon. :thumb:
:plus1: Don't get me wrong I dig them, it's like an El Camino with a cap slapped on top, saw a old doc with the surfers customizing them out.

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aka Yankee Gringo Gaijin aka Seppy Yank
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:30 am

hanno wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:56 am
davegorman wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:48 am
hanno wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:21 am
They are lorries, not trucks.
Lorries are under 7.5t trucks above that?
Not sure but when I was a school boy at school in Kenya, we certainly never learned the word "truck". They were all called lorries.
called Lorries in England too, comes from the Old English + Northern English word "Lurry" which means to Lug/Pull/Drag, here is an original Lurry/Lorry before motor vehicles...
ImageImageImage
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
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yong
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by yong » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:38 am

This is such an educational thread I shall bookmark it, I've learn a lot from this. :beer3:
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clutchcargo
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by clutchcargo » Sat Feb 09, 2019 1:20 pm

No. That's a shaggin' wagon. :thumb:
Also called 'sin bins'.. :la_rose:
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Freightdog
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by Freightdog » Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:02 pm

Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:30 am
called Lorries in England too, comes from the Old English + Northern English word "Lurry" which means to Lug/Pull/Drag, here is an original Lurry/Lorry before motor vehicles...
ImageImageImage
Surely these are not simple lorries? They be artics!

Did these ever catch on in France? I can see the risk of the French driver eating his engine
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phuketrichard
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by phuketrichard » Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:18 pm

we American's call pick up trucks
pick up trucks

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Ford F-150 Supercrew with tonneau, four doors, sidestep, and wind deflectors

Pickup truck
A pickup truck is a light-duty truck having an enclosed cab and an open cargo area with low sides and tailgate. Once a work tool with few creature comforts, in the 1950s, consumers began purchasing pickups for lifestyle reasons, and by the 1990s, less than 15% of owners reported use in work as the pickup truck's primary purpose. Today in North America, the pickup is mostly used like a passenger car and accounts for about 18% of total vehicles sold in the US.

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A 1922 Ford Model T pickup
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timmydownawell
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by timmydownawell » Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:22 pm

Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:30 am

called Lorries in England too, comes from the Old English + Northern English word "Lurry" which means to Lug/Pull/Drag, here is an original Lurry/Lorry before motor vehicles...
ImageImageImage
Learn something every day. I have always thought lorry was a funny word. Never caught on in the antipodes though, for some reason, even thought we speak the Queen's English there too. Well, NZ more than AU. Australia has a weird habit of taking the letter E out of words (e.g. judgment) and randomly popping them into words that don't need them (e.g. ageing, whingeing, although arguably the latter is an Australian word).
No matter how much it rains, the dirt never washes away.
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:40 pm

timmydownawell wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:22 pm
Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:30 am

called Lorries in England too, comes from the Old English + Northern English word "Lurry" which means to Lug/Pull/Drag, here is an original Lurry/Lorry before motor vehicles...
ImageImageImage
Learn something every day. I have always thought lorry was a funny word. Never caught on in the antipodes though, for some reason, even thought we speak the Queen's English there too. Well, NZ more than AU. Australia has a weird habit of taking the letter E out of words (e.g. judgment) and randomly popping them into words that don't need them (e.g. ageing, whingeing, although arguably the latter is an Australian word).
naa "Whinge" isnt Australian lol its an Old English word too, comes from Hwinsian - to wail or moan discontentedly
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
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timmydownawell
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Re: Truck vs Not a Truck

Post by timmydownawell » Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:46 pm

Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:40 pm
timmydownawell wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:22 pm
Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:30 am

called Lorries in England too, comes from the Old English + Northern English word "Lurry" which means to Lug/Pull/Drag, here is an original Lurry/Lorry before motor vehicles...
ImageImageImage
Learn something every day. I have always thought lorry was a funny word. Never caught on in the antipodes though, for some reason, even thought we speak the Queen's English there too. Well, NZ more than AU. Australia has a weird habit of taking the letter E out of words (e.g. judgment) and randomly popping them into words that don't need them (e.g. ageing, whingeing, although arguably the latter is an Australian word).
naa "Whinge" isnt Australian lol its an Old English word too, comes from Hwinsian - to wail or moan discontentedly
haha well that surprises me as it's most commonly used in the expression "whinging pom" :D
No matter how much it rains, the dirt never washes away.
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