Teachers’ extra earnings

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Bitte_Kein_Lexus
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus »

Keep in mind they only go to school for half a day. I'm not sure how that ever started, I've asked numerous people before and never got a good response. I just assume it's from the late 80s or early 90s when there was a shortage of teachers and facilities, and students started going to school only half a day at a time. Regardless of he reason(s) why, it just means that they get a lot less classroom time than the average kid in most other countries.

Second, the salary of teachers is quite low. Though they're increased around 40% in the past few years, it's still not really enough to live off. Most teachers then have to supplement by teaching "extra classes". The more you do, the more cash you make and they can then have a pretty decent income if they rack them up. In the city, you're looking at about an extra $1200-1700 in schooling per kid (especially in later stages of high school--Grades 10-12). Yes, it's a significant price in our mind (and theirs), but it's the way things are here. Just have to accept it. You won't change the system yourself. You options are to pay $$ for a full-time private school, or go to public school and pay for extra classes. Students choose either extras classes as part of a group (20-30), or semi-private (4-6) at home. Price obviously depends on the number of students, but an increasing number of them are spending a lot of money in grade 11 and 12.

It's a bit of a vicious circle as teachers don't make enough to support themselves, and if it were somehow banned (or teachers forced to work full day, for just a bit more pay), then you'd get mass exits from the profession. It depends on the teachers. Some also don't make it mandatory to pass. Sometimes it's also that weak students (or the ones that want a high core) want some extra personalized help. Until the government actually invests heavily into education (as Singapore and South Korea did decades ago), then this situation is unlikely to change.
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by taabarang »

"It's a bit of a vicious circle as teachers don't make enough to support themselves, and if it were somehow banned (or teachers forced to work full day, for just a bit more pay), then you'd get mass exits from the profession. Until the government actually invests heavily into education (as SIngapore and South Korea did decades ago), then this situation is unlikely to change."

We are in agreement in the main; it also explains why teachers sell snack food during the breaks. My sister-in-law teaches both morning and afternoon sessions due to a lack of teachers. Thus she draws two salaries. One she gets monthly and the other is a lump sum at some unspecified time at the end of the school year. If her husband didn't farm they would be in debt.
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John Bingham
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by John Bingham »

A lot of private schools here operate in a way that works with the public school system, they are basically just supplementary classes often focused on 2nd language skills. The one being discussed is one of them. The same group, as far as I know, own East West, which has far better facilities and far more comprehensive programs for international students.
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Jcml19 »

taabarang wrote: Tue Sep 24, 2019 11:15 am
OK, true enough to a certain point; there probably isn't any subject taught that doesn't require memorization. But the salient point is that we memorize to gain sufficient proficiency to use them as tools to solve tasks. We don't memorize for it's own sake e.g. to pass a test.

As for fraternization, my kids had a tough time. But why? They were subjected to racism because their father was a barang so they weren't "pure Cambodian" but merely "koan kaet" or half breeds.

There is no music, dance, art or sports taught. During break time I've seen the boys playing a pickup game of football on a hillside nonetheless. With no supervision it more resembled a mass Kung Fu match.
Agree... We've memorized the basic stuff and are proficient enough now to solve complex tasks and be creative thinkers... that all however took a lot of time and the correct environment. Cambodia can provide that but its tough as crap considering the extra time kids have to pivot from one language to another... Unless they are hangin with all english speakers, the environment is not the same as we were brought up..

Hahaha... I remember trying to rogue memorize formulas for math and science... Shoot, them formulas complicated as crap and i didnt have that fancy computer to use.. lambda x pie / square root hahaha... I cheated and had a cut sheet to remember those formulas hhaha

As for the kids running wild playing games, we all did that... Invented a bunch of xrazy games with my buds.. one jnvolved stepping on our black leather shoes while the nuns were yelling at us hahah
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Jcml19 »

Btw... How much are khmer teaches paid on a monthly basis?? I hope more than the minimum wage factory workers get at $190 a month.... :chin:
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by John Bingham »

Jcml19 wrote: Tue Sep 24, 2019 8:43 pm Btw... How much are khmer teaches paid on a monthly basis?? I hope more than the minimum wage factory workers get at $190 a month.... :chin:
I don't have any exact figures to hand, but it is my understanding that Cambodian teachers working in the national school system are paid considerably more than they were a decade ago or so. Salaries were as low as $30 then, and since are more in line with the wages you quoted. Teachers have always tried to expand on their salaries by giving extra classes. While I can understand that, holding back instruction for those not able to afford it is a terrible discrimination that needs to be addressed here.
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Anchor Moy »

Jcml19 wrote: Tue Sep 24, 2019 8:43 pm Btw... How much are khmer teaches paid on a monthly basis?? I hope more than the minimum wage factory workers get at $190 a month.... :chin:
From memory, my niece gets about $250pm now. Much better than it used to be. But she has about 70 students in her classes. She says they make a lot of noise and she is tiny with a small voice, so not sure how much anyone learns. :facepalm:
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Mishmash »

So we are all in the same boat for sure.

I find they don't do much team work, which handicaps later when you try to get them to organize, delegate and collate in work situations.

Yet despite this they do good work I find - if you leave them to it - and are prepared for low productivity.

All my Khmer friends agree with the sentiments this thread but sadly they too have to suffer like us and their kids also.

I have found some outstanding examples of Engineering within Construction, they can run rings round me now, so there is more than hope.

We took some who were doing degrees and spoke to their teachers and college, promised we would give them the real thing in the real world on large construction projects, pay them a salary and pay for their night school, in return for a guaranteed pass. Kind of like the UK apprenticeship scheme.. Luckily it worked.. I cannot praise my former students enough.. They teach their own teams now.

Myanmar was far far worse.. They came with degrees to the interview.. I drew an L-shaped room and asked them to calculate the area.. couldn't do it - amazing..

I would give a drawing with the title of what it was on it and asked them what it was - maybe half got it...

Despite that we took them on based on attitude towards the work.. Sat with them day after day until they got it..

They executed the actual site work at maybe half Khmer speed after training..

Anyway - back to the schools... I haven't the solution.. The Khmer so desperately want it.. They know they are being had..

The schools where they have a big set of Filipina teachers are the best really. They love their job and are dedicated professionals for the most part.

A few friends of my wife were Filipina and I went to their house (how they love to crowd together 90 in a room lol) and even at 9pm they were comparing notes and setting out their lessons, discussing student welfare, testing better methodologies. It was truly impressive dedication.

Sadly, even they are handicapped by the 'bosses', who, despite their apparent commitment and big words on the brochures are really just money grabbers.

I hate to say that but it is true.

Until this government recognizes the valuable role teachers play and are prepared to compensate them on a more equitable basis the situation will continue.

I have seen Khmer teachers treated like shit by the private schools - they couldn't even buy new clothes. Wages always late. Boss in a massive car with their wives dripping with gold.

Frankly sickening.

I raised the money with my friends for a library building in the province for one school. They were so grateful, even a hardened capitalist like myself was moved to tears. They read the names of the funders every year in a ceremony.

Keep plugging away guys...
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Jcml19 »

Mishmash wrote: Tue Sep 24, 2019 10:10 pm
Sadly, even they are handicapped by the 'bosses', who, despite their apparent commitment and big words on the brochures are really just money grabbers.

I hate to say that but it is true.

Until this government recognizes the valuable role teachers play and are prepared to compensate them on a more equitable basis the situation will continue.

I have seen Khmer teachers treated like shit by the private schools - they couldn't even buy new clothes. Wages always late. Boss in a massive car with their wives dripping with gold.

Frankly sickening.

I raised the money with my friends for a library building in the province for one school. They were so grateful, even a hardened capitalist like myself was moved to tears. They read the names of the funders every year in a ceremony.

Keep plugging away guys...
Amen bro!!!

Capitalism works just need a few tweaks here and there bc nothings perfect...

Education, education and education.... Im sure the bosses are getting a cut off the top from the school funds and teachers ot.... Sad... :protest:
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Bitte_Kein_Lexus
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Re: Teachers’ extra earnings

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus »

They make around $400. Under five years ago it was $200-250, so there's definitely been a good increase. Still, it's not exactly much considering factory workers make $190 minimum, not counting overtime... Most professionals can now easily make $400-1000, so it's definitely on the lower end of the spectrum. Can't really afford a house or anything like that on just the official salary, so the increase mostly helps with inflation more than anything. They can earn an additional $400-1000 with the extra classes, depending on how many they do in their off time. Unless salaries significantly increase, they're unlikely to stop doing them.
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