"The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

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Soi Dog
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"The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

Post by Soi Dog » Sun Aug 17, 2014 12:43 am

Underground bus stations, in a city famous for flooding? And taking away 2 existing lanes of traffic to cars on popular routes will improve traffic?
PPP wrote:A solution to the capital’s transit woes?
Sat, 16 August 2014
Bennett Murray and Vandy Muong
Some say City Hall’s scheme to improve public transport with a bus line is failing. One architect has a new plan, tried and tested throughout the developing world

With the capital growing and incomes on the rise, rush hour in Phnom Penh is only getting worse as more and more motorbikes and tuk-tuks compete with sedans and SUVs for ever-dwindling space on the asphalt.

While a limited public bus service was introduced in the capital earlier this year, and new routes are planned, Prime Minister HE last month declared early efforts a “failure”.

Passengers would board the buses at underground terminals.
Passengers would board the buses at underground terminals. DESIGNS BY RUBEN CASTILLERO-MORTERA
One architect believes that the city’s best bet is an alternative and time-tested bus system that has taken off across the developing world from Bogota to Jakarta.

Ruben Castillero-Mortera, an architecture professor at Raffles International College, has drawn up plans for a “bus rapid transit” (BRT) system that calls for more than 100 stops around the city along seven lines.

But the buses wouldn’t have to grind through traffic to reach their destinations – two lanes in the centre of the city’s main roads would be reserved exclusively for the buses.

Traffic trials

Castillero said that the concept was far more cost efficient than subways, an idea floated earlier this year by private investors and the city municipality.

“I think this can open [Cambodia] to the world, to start thinking about something more realistic than a metro or monorail,” the 39-year-old Mexico City native said last week.

Castillero’s design calls for passengers to use automated ticket machines to access platforms from which they would board the buses.

The stations would be underground to minimise obstruction to regular street traffic, although the bus lanes between stations would be at street level.

The system’s dedicated bus lanes would allow for a network that functions with the efficiency of a subway, he said, without the tunnels, railways or trains. Although the cost of a BRT would run into the millions, it would be far cheaper than building a subway.

Although the system would reduce road space available for other vehicles, Castillero said that an efficient BRT would reduce the city’s overall traffic. “At the beginning, some motorists will complain that they have less space to drive, but having a rapid transit system running would be beneficial for all,” he said.

Castillero has yet to pitch his plan to City Hall, but it will be formally unveiled at the Our City 2015 festival. If the municipality accepts the design, it would be the largest project ever carried out by the architect, who worked freelance in both Mexico and the UK before becoming a professor.

“I kind of formed it for my pleasure to participate in the Our City festival more than as a proposal. But then I started to develop research and reached an outcome,” said Castillero, who holds a master’s degree in Advanced Architectural Studies from the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.

About 180 cities currently have a BRT system, with Latin America holding the largest share.

Among the most successful is Bogota’s BRT system in Colombia, which prompted the US Department of Transportation to state in a 2006 report that the city’s system provided “irrefutable evidence of what BRT can do”.

But City Hall spokesman Long Dimanche said Phnom Penh needs to develop a functioning conventional bus system first. He said: “Next month, we will have three bus lines, so I think it will work very well to serve the people in the city.”

The BRT concept has made some inroads in Southeast Asia. At about 200 kilometres in length, TransJakarta’s BRT is the largest in the world. Bangkok’s BRT has a single route and covers 16 kilometres.

But while many systems use complicated networks of underground stations, Dinesh Mohan, a professor of biomechanics and epidemiology at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi who has conducted extensive research in Indian BRT systems, said a BRT could be as simple as having a single slice of road reserved for public transport.

“BRT means very different things to different people. The main issue is [to have] a very well-integrated public transport system [and] for lanes to be reserved for public transport,” Mohan said in a phone interview from New Delhi, adding that his city ought to expand its miniscule BRT network.

Whatever the details, the city’s rapid development puts greater urgency to develop a feasible mass transit system, said Castillero.

“It is ideal to start planning for the future a proper sustainable transport system like a BRT, [rather] than trying to minimise the traffic, with human-hours wasted with minor solutions and delaying the problem even more while the mobility of the city collapses.”
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OrangeDragon
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Re: "The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

Post by OrangeDragon » Sun Aug 17, 2014 6:13 am

It's likely a failure because HE didn't make any money from it.
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Re: "The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

Post by Lonestar » Mon Aug 18, 2014 8:39 am

The BRT system in Colombia is fantastic. A simple and cheap means of providing a Metro. The bus lanes are segregated for only the buses....so they can fly through town. I think Phnom Penh would be well served to build elevated roads. They could construct an elevated single lane each way and place elevated stations along the route. The buses can be electric, and you can add sections to them to make them as long as you want. It is a wonderful and inexpensive option.
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Re: "The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

Post by Soi Dog » Mon Aug 18, 2014 8:42 am

Lonestar wrote: It is a wonderful and inexpensive option.
Elevated roads are hugely expensive. And most streets in PP aren't wide enough to take away 2 lanes of traffic as is without causing chaos.
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Re: "The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

Post by The Add Jay » Mon Aug 18, 2014 11:50 am

Lonestar wrote:The BRT system in Colombia is fantastic. A simple and cheap means of providing a Metro. The bus lanes are segregated for only the buses....so they can fly through town. I think Phnom Penh would be well served to build elevated roads. They could construct an elevated single lane each way and place elevated stations along the route. The buses can be electric, and you can add sections to them to make them as long as you want. It is a wonderful and inexpensive option.
Yeah Lonstar! and the roads will be made of gummy bears and street light post made of candy canes! Oh doo goody! it will be dandy for ALL of us. Not just khmer people but for the whole world!!!

Get fucking real dude.
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The Add Jay
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Re: "The buses are a failure"...so let's expand

Post by The Add Jay » Mon Aug 18, 2014 12:00 pm

They need to drastically curb car uses...which they have been doing through tax. Unfortunately regulate Tuk Tuks and no street vendors on the major roads...mao nordom monivong. This city is not America where its all be accounted for previously. The city was designed for Buses and motos not some "king khmer" Royal Military 40 feet to the liter Lexus SUV.

Im pro having a car and driving whatever you damn well please but...cmon 2 hours to get 4km is insane.

Expanding the outskirts city they MUST take in account for parking...New stung meanchy is ideal for this.

Bottom line P.P is not meant for cars in anyway. Trains or anything above or below ground will never happen....you forget P.P is next to the Mekong? I work in Manciple planning. I'm telling you...this city will collapse in on itself cause of just sheer greed and inability to see what lies ahead.

Do you guys wanna know where your vegetables come from?? You may never eat any type of green in P.P ever again.
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