My Street This Afternoon (Phnom Penh's Flash Flood)

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FreeSocrates!
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by FreeSocrates! » Fri Jul 04, 2014 10:31 pm

^ Cool beans, so if the spark plug is in tight, theoretically the whole engine can be immersed?

Also I read off Google that if your bike floods you should flip it over and kick it a few times, then stand it up right and kick it a few times more.
The cedar roasted asparagus has good chew. I don't know how to enjoy it, so I'll Instagram it instead.
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Bitte_Kein_Lexus
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus » Fri Jul 04, 2014 11:08 pm

Yeah... Exhaust is fine, so is spark plug provided it's properly seated. If water gets in your air intake though you're fucked. I once dropped by bike during a river crossing but luckily it was on the exhaust side (air intake on mine being on the other side) and despite it being completely submerged for around 2 seconds I was able to lift it up and start it up. Guess the air filter soaked up water before it could get it. Exhaust was full of course but it started and ran no problem. I had a scooter that was really sensitive to water though. Even a bit of rain would make it stall. Electrical problem no doubt...
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FreeSocrates!
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by FreeSocrates! » Fri Jul 04, 2014 11:31 pm

Thanks for the info... now where the fuck is the air intake?

I'd imagine somewhere close to the carb?
The cedar roasted asparagus has good chew. I don't know how to enjoy it, so I'll Instagram it instead.
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus » Fri Jul 04, 2014 11:39 pm

Usually under one of the plastic side panels. Pretty high up on a dirt bike. Some are even under the seat. Not sure about TTR s (left or right).

Actually a quick Google search on my phone leads me to believe it's under the seat.
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FreeSocrates!
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by FreeSocrates! » Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:08 am

Thanks, I'll have to check it out.
The cedar roasted asparagus has good chew. I don't know how to enjoy it, so I'll Instagram it instead.
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by StroppyChops » Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:27 am

For any bike the rule with water is to keep the intake above the waterline and keep the revs up, all the time - harder to do with anything automatic. Water in your intake equals water in your cylinder(s) which, if you can actually get spark and fuel, can crack your block. If you get water in your block, remove the spark plug and hand crank the bike which should jet the water out the plug socket. If the bike is light enough, turn it up and drain any water out the spark plug socket. If your bike stands in water deep enough for the water to run up the exhaust (because it stalled or you downshifted without keeping the pressure up), tip it up to let the water run out, and soak that sucker with WD40 or CRC when you get home.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
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ExPenhMan
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by ExPenhMan » Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:45 am

JokerP, super pictures, man.

That was a real soaker of a day. Glad I couldn't get to PP this weekend. Looks like a couple or three weeks away. Hopefully drier then.
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by StroppyChops » Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:48 am

Image
Toul Tompoung

Image
National Museum
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by FreeSocrates! » Sat Jul 05, 2014 1:17 am

StroppyChops wrote:For any bike the rule with water is to keep the intake above the waterline and keep the revs up, all the time - harder to do with anything automatic. Water in your intake equals water in your cylinder(s) which, if you can actually get spark and fuel, can crack your block. If you get water in your block, remove the spark plug and hand crank the bike which should jet the water out the plug socket. If the bike is light enough, turn it up and drain any water out the spark plug socket. If your bike stands in water deep enough for the water to run up the exhaust (because it stalled or you downshifted without keeping the pressure up), tip it up to let the water run out, and soak that sucker with WD40 or CRC when you get home.
Good tips. I always thought it was actually hard to crack or warp anything... maybe easier in Cambodia?

In BC I got stuck in the mountains 2000 meters up with failed breaks. We were young then and had little experience of life and physics. We threw cold water on them.

They still didn't work ( :roll: ). We used the tranny to take us down the mountain and eventually the brakes started working again! Never had problems with those brakes after that, maybe they re-warped on the descent.

Yeah the stupidest thing ever... Moral of the story: Honda Civics are amazing. My friend just sold his 1979, (pic below).

(Sorry for going off topic so much, if it's hot and made of something metallic looking don't throw water on it)

Image
The cedar roasted asparagus has good chew. I don't know how to enjoy it, so I'll Instagram it instead.
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StroppyChops
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Re: My Street This Afternoon

Post by StroppyChops » Sat Jul 05, 2014 1:22 am

FreeSocrates! wrote:
StroppyChops wrote:For any bike the rule with water is to keep the intake above the waterline and keep the revs up, all the time - harder to do with anything automatic. Water in your intake equals water in your cylinder(s) which, if you can actually get spark and fuel, can crack your block. If you get water in your block, remove the spark plug and hand crank the bike which should jet the water out the plug socket. If the bike is light enough, turn it up and drain any water out the spark plug socket. If your bike stands in water deep enough for the water to run up the exhaust (because it stalled or you downshifted without keeping the pressure up), tip it up to let the water run out, and soak that sucker with WD40 or CRC when you get home.
Good tips. I always thought it was actually hard to crack or warp anything... maybe easier in Cambodia?

In BC I got stuck in the mountains 2000 meters up with failed breaks. We were young then and had little experience of life and physics. We threw cold water on them.

They still didn't work ( :roll: ). We used the tranny to take us down the mountain and eventually the brakes started working again! Never had problems with those brakes after that, maybe they re-warped on the descent.

Yeah the stupidest thing ever... Moral of the story: Honda Civics are amazing. My friend just sold his 1979, (pic below).

(Sorry for going off topic so much, if it's hot and made of something metallic looking don't throw water on it)

Image
More likely on bigger multicylinder engines, water doesn't compress and the valves function as, well, valves, so something has to give.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
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