Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

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phuketrichard
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Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by phuketrichard »

Although its stickman so thailand, am sure it fits for Cambodia.
I wonder, if i wasn't in a relationship and was living on a budget, would i want to live in SE Asia? Would i find visiting bars (i visit maybe 1 / month an thats really only to eat their food) every Or every other night a way to spend my last years ?
More than a few foreign retirees in Thailand strike me as miserable. Living in their small condo with crappy furniture, a rock-hard bed and not a single photo of family, are they really as happy as they make out?

Many single, foreign retirees in Thailand have simplified their lifestyle to what strikes me as the extreme. Long gone are the days of living in a house, rather many exist in a condo, often a small studio that feels like a shoebox. Where once they might have had a car or two in their homeland, now they may have a motorbike, or no vehicle at all. They might be able to pack their whole life in to just a suitcase or two.

There are plenty of arguments for simplifying your life. Capital isn’t tied up in property. You don’t have the hassles or expense of vehicle servicing and maintenance. You’re free of encumbrances and you can up and move on at the drop of a hat if you so wish.
I don’t subscribe to the idea that you need to keep busy, but I do think life is better, and more enriching if you have something or someone to care for, in other words something with real meaning.
https://www.stickmanbangkok.com/weekly- ... eaningful/
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by atst »

Im retired just bumbing around from hotel to hotel different towns eat out all the time ,have girlfriend but get bored many days, I look back at my mates back home in thier big house cars ,retired mowing the lawn cleaning the pool , sometimes I think it would be nice to be like them then I go out have a beer and lunch and think NO WAY
I'm standing up, so I must be straight.
Black night is falling, oh I hate to be alone.
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by Khmu Nation »

They are here for the cheap beer and the easy women. Nothing wrong with that.
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by offroadscholar »

phuketrichard wrote: Sat Jan 25, 2020 10:00 am Although its stickman so thailand, am sure it fits for Cambodia.
I wonder, if i wasn't in a relationship and was living on a budget, would i want to live in SE Asia? Would i find visiting bars (i visit maybe 1 / month an thats really only to eat their food) every Or every other night a way to spend my last years ?
More than a few foreign retirees in Thailand strike me as miserable. Living in their small condo with crappy furniture, a rock-hard bed and not a single photo of family, are they really as happy as they make out?

Many single, foreign retirees in Thailand have simplified their lifestyle to what strikes me as the extreme. Long gone are the days of living in a house, rather many exist in a condo, often a small studio that feels like a shoebox. Where once they might have had a car or two in their homeland, now they may have a motorbike, or no vehicle at all. They might be able to pack their whole life in to just a suitcase or two.

There are plenty of arguments for simplifying your life. Capital isn’t tied up in property. You don’t have the hassles or expense of vehicle servicing and maintenance. You’re free of encumbrances and you can up and move on at the drop of a hat if you so wish.
I don’t subscribe to the idea that you need to keep busy, but I do think life is better, and more enriching if you have something or someone to care for, in other words something with real meaning.
https://www.stickmanbangkok.com/weekly- ... eaningful/
Living in nice surroundings is worth the extra costs imo. You can still minimize and get out and about for socializing. Best of both worlds....
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by Anthony's Weiner »

"More than a few foreign retirees in Thailand strike me as miserable. Living in their small condo with crappy furniture, a rock-hard bed and not a single photo of family, are they really as happy as they make out?

For the first 5 years in Thailand I led that sort of simple life. I wasn’t retired, of course, but my life was about as simple as it gets. I lived in a studio apartment. I had no car, nor did I own a motosai. None of the furniture was mine. Almost all of my belongings could fit in a backpack.

Getting back to retirees in Thailand, the impression I have is that many have simplified their life to the xth degree. They’ve gone too far and there is nothing meaningful left. I get it that some are on a budget and some may wish to minimise responsibilities, but take it too far and what is left?

But at the same time, it seems to me that some retirees have simplified their life to such a degree that there’s little to nothing left that is in any way meaningful. And that’s kind of sad. It’s not my idea of a great retirement."

A poorly written article in which stickboy describes his first five years in Thailand as unfulfilling and then attributes his lifestyle on the" OK Boomer" generation. A single retiree must have 800,000 baht in ready cash to obtain a visa vs the signed contract and sweet [email protected] all other than a pair of dress shoes and a tie that a TEFL teacher must-have. I would suggest there are far more English as a second language teachers living on their 25,000 baht a month salary unable to afford the finer things in life than retirees living single with nothing more than a rock hard mattress. In Sisaket there is a corner at the night market where the down and out, bitter, single men of western heritage have their 3 beers a night and discuss what needs to be done to make Thailand a better place to live, all are employed as English teachers. My impression of them is if they weren t here, they would be back in Pretoria, Swindon or St Louis having a beer at night, single and bitter that their lives were had not blossomed as they dreamed of.

But to answer his rhetorical question, living alone on a meager budget and no prospects of change is a dreary lifestyle. Millions of retirees do it from Adelaide to Atlanta to Aachen. At least in Thailand the beer is cheaper, the food tastier and there is likely someone reasonably attractive that your meager lifestyle is either a step up or a lateral move and willing to share it with you. Stickboy, stick to what you know best, the latest gossip from Nana Plaza.
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by clutchcargo »

Khmu Nation wrote: Sat Jan 25, 2020 11:52 am They are here for the cheap beer and the easy women. Nothing wrong with that.
Each to their own I guess, and much depends how well off you are, however I would add that I never have to cook or clean here. Don't miss doing that back home.

In terms of doing something meaningful, I do cringe when I see retirees back home at the clubs playing the pokies..albeit I guess Nagaworld has those too.
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by Kung-fu Hillbilly »

I live a semi retired life for half of the year or more wandering the region and I'd classify myself a complete minimalist, even when living back in the west. For me, simplifying the mind was as important as simplifying my life. As corny as it sounds, my meaning comes from quite trivial or mundane aspects of existence whether it be walking through and exploring new environments, lazing with locals over coffee, enjoying fog over a lake...told you it was corny. I have absolutely no need for anything material other than carry-on clothes camera and small laptop that all weigh in at 7kg. Personally, I no longer have any desire for much more other than somewhere interesting to walk or sit. Observing and engaging the world around me in very straightforward or uncomplicated ways is for me, very meaningful and fulfilling. A market, a river, a mountain, a lake.... a street sweeper to talk to, a loaf of bread to bake....a photo to take.

Comparing or judging others lifestyle choices based on my preferences, or trying to gauge if their existence has much or any meaning, seems absurd to me. How can I possibly consider what's enjoyable for someone else? I've met more than a few interesting fellows completely content with their stone hut in winter on the side of a mountain in the Himalaya with no company other than a cow and a fire (one guy in the Kullu Valley was a genius). For those choosing to eek out an existence by going native in India, Cambodia or Thailand or wherever, more power to you if it's enough. At the end of the day who gives a fuck? if you've managed to carve out a little piece of peace from this world, good for you. Many of us need very little to find meaning in life.
The idea that seeing the world is going from place to place to look at obvious things is an illusion natural to dull minds.
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by Khmu Nation »

Yeah each to there own. I would like to think if I was a retiree out here I would do something constructive like learn the language or study the culture or teach English for free to a few people or have some positive hobby whether that be cycling or photography.

However the stereotype retiree seems to have left home under a cloud, bankruptcy divorce or enforced early retirement due to getting laid off, and they are here to piss the remaining years away drinking, drugging and fucking. Nothing wrong with that either. But there are better and more fulfilling ways to exist.

A lot are economic migrants - they can lead a better life here than home. It amuses me when I listen to an old Brexiterr propping up the bar in de Asia bitching about the Eastern European’s in UK when, fundamentally, they are doing the same thing here. Just trying to lead a better life than there own country can offer them.

I lived in Nha Trang for a year and was a bit of a barfly and got involved in the expat bar social life. All everyone did was moan and moan about the Vietnamese, gossip about each other (they were always falling out over the tiniest things) and discuss currency exchange rates, visa news and land they were thinking of buying but never did.

Now I work a 45 hour week, take exercise, never go to bars and drink a beer a night at home. I also read up about local history. Much happier for it too.
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by phuketrichard »

Anthony's Weiner wrote: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:46 pm "More than a few foreign retirees in Thailand strike me as miserable. Living in their small condo with crappy furniture, a rock-hard bed and not a single photo of family, are they really as happy as they make out?

For the first 5 years in Thailand I led that sort of simple life. I wasn’t retired, of course, but my life was about as simple as it gets. I lived in a studio apartment. I had no car, nor did I own a motosai. None of the furniture was mine. Almost all of my belongings could fit in a backpack.

Getting back to retirees in Thailand, the impression I have is that many have simplified their life to the xth degree. They’ve gone too far and there is nothing meaningful left. I get it that some are on a budget and some may wish to minimise responsibilities, but take it too far and what is left?

But at the same time, it seems to me that some retirees have simplified their life to such a degree that there’s little to nothing left that is in any way meaningful. And that’s kind of sad. It’s not my idea of a great retirement."

A poorly written article in which stickboy describes his first five years in Thailand as unfulfilling and then attributes his lifestyle on the" OK Boomer" generation. A single retiree must have 800,000 baht in ready cash to obtain a visa vs the signed contract and sweet [email protected] all other than a pair of dress shoes and a tie that a TEFL teacher must-have. I would suggest there are far more English as a second language teachers living on their 25,000 baht a month salary unable to afford the finer things in life than retirees living single with nothing more than a rock hard mattress. In Sisaket there is a corner at the night market where the down and out, bitter, single men of western heritage have their 3 beers a night and discuss what needs to be done to make Thailand a better place to live, all are employed as English teachers. My impression of them is if they weren t here, they would be back in Pretoria, Swindon or St Louis having a beer at night, single and bitter that their lives were had not blossomed as they dreamed of.

But to answer his rhetorical question, living alone on a meager budget and no prospects of change is a dreary lifestyle. Millions of retirees do it from Adelaide to Atlanta to Aachen. At least in Thailand the beer is cheaper, the food tastier and there is likely someone reasonably attractive that your meager lifestyle is either a step up or a lateral move and willing to share it with you. Stickboy, stick to what you know best, the latest gossip from Nana Plaza.
I think if i was alone i would do one of two things, travel alot more than i do now with no home base. Stopping in places i'd like to explore more.
OR head back to the states, buy a Westfalia VW camper and drive around visiting friends and places with trips elsewhere.

I think he brings up some good points, many retires never really did much except school, work and raise a family so really get overwhelmed with so much time to themselves, (my brother comes to mind). Many have no hobbies and are not particularly happy with their lives an dont have the $$ or mindset to change. PLUS left their home countries (an x wife & grown kids) to live in SE asia where they had never even visited before they left the rat race.

Side note; I dont really understand why so many retirees spend so much time in bars ( especially the ones i see at 10 am siting in one over a beer) with the same group of "friends".

I have tried to minimize my possession and simplify my life,( an have been successful at that) but dam its hard to give up my books and art. BUT have stopped buying more:-)

Doubt i'd ever live in a studio apt, alone in one place in SE asia
In a nation run by swine, all pigs are upward-mobile and the rest of us are fucked until we can put our acts together: not necessarily to win, but mainly to keep from losing completely. HST
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Re: Retirees, And The Lack Of Anything Meaningful

Post by Duncan »

phuketrichard wrote: Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:03 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:46 pm "More than a few foreign retirees in Thailand strike me as miserable. Living in their small condo with crappy furniture, a rock-hard bed and not a single photo of family, are they really as happy as they make out?

For the first 5 years in Thailand I led that sort of simple life. I wasn’t retired, of course, but my life was about as simple as it gets. I lived in a studio apartment. I had no car, nor did I own a motosai. None of the furniture was mine. Almost all of my belongings could fit in a backpack.

Getting back to retirees in Thailand, the impression I have is that many have simplified their life to the xth degree. They’ve gone too far and there is nothing meaningful left. I get it that some are on a budget and some may wish to minimise responsibilities, but take it too far and what is left?

But at the same time, it seems to me that some retirees have simplified their life to such a degree that there’s little to nothing left that is in any way meaningful. And that’s kind of sad. It’s not my idea of a great retirement."

A poorly written article in which stickboy describes his first five years in Thailand as unfulfilling and then attributes his lifestyle on the" OK Boomer" generation. A single retiree must have 800,000 baht in ready cash to obtain a visa vs the signed contract and sweet [email protected] all other than a pair of dress shoes and a tie that a TEFL teacher must-have. I would suggest there are far more English as a second language teachers living on their 25,000 baht a month salary unable to afford the finer things in life than retirees living single with nothing more than a rock hard mattress. In Sisaket there is a corner at the night market where the down and out, bitter, single men of western heritage have their 3 beers a night and discuss what needs to be done to make Thailand a better place to live, all are employed as English teachers. My impression of them is if they weren t here, they would be back in Pretoria, Swindon or St Louis having a beer at night, single and bitter that their lives were had not blossomed as they dreamed of.

But to answer his rhetorical question, living alone on a meager budget and no prospects of change is a dreary lifestyle. Millions of retirees do it from Adelaide to Atlanta to Aachen. At least in Thailand the beer is cheaper, the food tastier and there is likely someone reasonably attractive that your meager lifestyle is either a step up or a lateral move and willing to share it with you. Stickboy, stick to what you know best, the latest gossip from Nana Plaza.
I think if i was alone i would do one of two things, travel alot more than i do now with no home base. Stopping in places i'd like to explore more.
OR head back to the states, buy a Westfalia VW camper and drive around visiting friends and places with trips elsewhere.

I think he brings up some good points, many retires never really did much except school, work and raise a family so really get overwhelmed with so much time to themselves, (my brother comes to mind). Many have no hobbies and are not particularly happy with their lives an dont have the $$ or mindset to change. PLUS left their home countries (an x wife & grown kids) to live in SE asia where they had never even visited before they left the rat race.

Side note; I dont really understand why so many retirees spend so much time in bars ( especially the ones i see at 10 am siting in one over a beer) with the same group of "friends".

I have tried to minimize my possession and simplify my life,( an have been successful at that) but dam its hard to give up my books and art. BUT have stopped buying more:-)

Doubt i'd ever live in a studio apt, alone in one place in SE asia
Side note; I dont really understand why so many retirees spend so much time in bars ( especially the ones i see at 10 am siting in one over a beer) with the same group of "friends".


Turn the page and there are others like a guy I know that has owned a bar for years and has never drank as much as one beer in there.

As for me , I have tried to simplify my life, by getting rid of '' stuff '' that sits around for years and never gets used. Its all just junk and not needed as you cannot take it with you to the grave.
Cambodia,,,, Don't fall in love with her.
Like the spoilt child she is, she will not be happy till she destroys herself from within and breaks your heart.
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