Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

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Kammekor
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by Kammekor » Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:34 pm

IFLstudent wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:57 am
Must be tabarang actually does have some misconception of what local actually eats. To tell you the truth, for example, it's pretty much committed a sin when consuming a turtle. However, turtle dishes is norm because it nets higher profits from tabarang and maybe tabarang loves trying new things 😂 😂.
Maybe you consider eating a turtle is a sin but I know loads of Cambodians out in the provinces having different thoughts. I even know some farms where the turtles are grown for consumption.

Cambodia is a pretty large country, with different ideas and opinions in different parts of the country. Your (Phnom Penh based?) views might not reflect the thoughts of all Cambodians.
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by Kammekor » Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:46 pm

IFLstudent wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:57 am
Back to the question what does the local eats, which is considered as cultural shock to foreigners? Dog meats. It's popular near liquor store, and it's pretty much standard appetite alcoholic beverages and side-dishes for bozo. That's why I underlined the "booming market". Well, you got one thing is that article is 4 years old.
Again, you're probably a city-kind-of person.

Visit a local market in the boonies, and you will find sellers selling dog-chopped-to-pieces for 20-30k per KG.

When my dog was hit by a car, and dying, the bidding process for the corpse started before the animal was even fully dead. There's a big market for 'special meat', and it's not just the Vietnamese and Chinese partaking in the meal. Loads of Khmer's like it too, though far from all I have to admit.
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by CEOCambodiaNews » Tue Sep 03, 2019 1:43 am

Formerly disgusting mice are now for sale
[Original headline]
September 2, 2019
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Kompong Chhnang: Formerly disgusting mice [rats] are now being sold almost daily and they have become a popular commodity for everyday consumption and are no longer considered disgusting.
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A woman who buys the rats in Kampong Chhnang said that every morning she came to weigh in and buy rats sold by the villagers on the river. In just one morning she can deal in 70 kilograms to 100 kilograms of rats. General prices are from 7000-10,000 riel a kilo. Rat catchers usually take up their trade when they are not fishing or farming.
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Rats are seen for sale in the market in Kampong Chhnang and elsewhere, and they are a popular food for locals as roasted or fried meat.
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Rats are eaten all year round but, but the meat is most delicious in the rainy season. People say that the rats from the countryside are clean animals living on grass roots, rice, wild fruits, and some crops, but that the town rats are disgusting.
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by Doc67 » Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:48 am

obelisks wrote:
Tue Aug 26, 2014 2:32 pm
they look awfully like Pedigree Siberian hamsters to me
"BASIL!"

They were very popular in London at one time between 1665 and 1666 (until the Great Fire)
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Tue Sep 03, 2019 9:16 am

Kammekor wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:34 pm
IFLstudent wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:57 am
To tell you the truth, for example, it's pretty much committed a sin when consuming a turtle.
Maybe you consider eating a turtle is a sin but I know loads of Cambodians out in the provinces having different thoughts. I even know some farms where the turtles are grown for consumption.
Never heard that one, about "Cambodians" committing a sin by eating turtles.
And like Kammekor said - it is quite common.

However it is definitely a sin for some Cambodians - turtle and tortoise are not Halal, so the Muslims do not eat them.
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by clutchcargo » Tue Sep 03, 2019 1:42 pm

BBQ rat seller, Battambang
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by CEOCambodiaNews » Tue Aug 18, 2020 9:47 am

In Takeo, Migrant Families Turn to Rat Trade Amid Covid-19 Pandemic
10 min read

Mech Dara and Ananth Baliga
| Mon Aug 17, 2020 11:00 am

KOH ANDET DISTRICT, Takeo — It is late July in Takeo province, as Lor Sam Ath opens a large, neon orange cooler, removing a massive slab of ice. The Takeo resident then proceeds to hack away at the slab, icy shards flying in every direction as he carves pieces of ice the size of a grapefruit.

The bare-chested man inserts a hunk of ice into each of the 10 large, wire-mesh cages in his front yard. Each cage is packed to the brim with squirming — and a few dead — rice field rats. The ice allows the rodents to stay hydrated and survive the journey to neighboring Vietnam where they will be sold.

Sam Ath and his wife Tum Sok are among the many brokers who collect rats caught by villagers in Takeo’s Koh Andet district. During the rainy season, the rising waters in the rice fields surrounding the district provide an ample supply of palm-sized, gray rodents.

The rats, which usually feed on rice stalks, are then exported to Vietnam, where they are cooked up and consumed. A number of villagers are coy when asked about the exported rats’ fates, with only Sam Ath loudly exclaiming: “They eat them!”

Sok, 48, says they had to stop buying rats from villagers in April and early May because the Vietnamese border was closed in March due to the coronavirus pandemic. It was only in late May, she says, that they could resume sending live rats across the border, either by road or small waterways. After restarting their business, Sok and Sam Ath, 51, say they have seen an increase in people catching rats and selling the rodents to the various brokers in their district.

“There are many people who are now selling rats because they do not have any employment to buy food,” Sok says.
“There is too much supply,” Sok explains. “As long as they catch, we will buy, but if our buyers in Vietnam don’t buy then we cannot.” Prices, she says, have dropped from 5,000 riel (around $1.25) a kilogram to 4,500 riel ($1.10) during the monsoon season, which started in May.

Sok says there has been an increase in people catching rats in the district, mostly because many have been out of work and have had few employment opportunities since the start of the global Covid-19 pandemic — except for work in the rice fields.

“It is helpful for the villagers,” Sok says, referring to the rat trade. “They can at least earn 10,000 riel ($2.50) to 15,000 ($ 3.75) riel a day.”
https://vodenglish.news/in-takeo-migran ... -pandemic/
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Re: Rat Meat: A Growing Market by Kevin Doyle

Post by Khmu Nation » Tue Aug 18, 2020 10:15 am

I got woken up by a rat on my face whilst staying at a hotel in Vinh.
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