Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

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timmydownawell
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by timmydownawell » Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:59 pm

Username Taken wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:56 pm
Wanker Wat wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:27 pm
I can’t see that anything else is on that circuit. I tried adjusting to less than full heat but it still trips it. I tried showering in the dark. Didn’t help.

What does work is turning off the water /box every 45 seconds for about ten seconds, but this is not an ideal way to shower .

I did mention it to the landlord, how would this be fixed anyway? Is it easy or a big fix?
Had a similar problem years back. Fixed by upgrading the fuse in the breaker/fuse box from something like 10 Amp to 15 or 20 (can't remember).
You could cause a fire by doing that if the wiring is not up to it.
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by explorer » Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:15 pm

Wanker Wat wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:27 pm
I can’t see that anything else is on that circuit. I tried adjusting to less than full heat but it still trips it. I tried showering in the dark. Didn’t help.

What does work is turning off the water /box every 45 seconds for about ten seconds, but this is not an ideal way to shower .

I did mention it to the landlord, how would this be fixed anyway? Is it easy or a big fix?
The only way to know would be to get an electrician (who knows what he is doing) to look at it.

Is it the circuit breaker on the heater, or a circuit breaker supplying power to the heater?

If it is a circuit breaker supplying power to the heater, it could be fixed by running larger wires from the main switchboard to the heater, and a circuit breaker which trips at a higher amps.

Most buildings in Cambodia dont have earth wires, and the wires they have are thinner than used in Australia. The only way to fix some buildings would be to rewire the building. When you see the other things wrong in some buildings, the only way to fix them all would be to demolish the building and build a new one.
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John Bingham
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by John Bingham » Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:40 pm

explorer wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:15 pm
The only way to fix some buildings would be to rewire the building. When you see the other things wrong in some buildings, the only way to fix them all would be to demolish the building and build a new one.
You don't need to demolish any building because of electrics. You can just rip them out and start again or bypass the old mess. It's damp issues including bad plumbing/ leaking roofs/ rusting rebar/ concrete cancer that damage most buildings to the extent that they need tp be completely rebuilt.
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by Username Taken » Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:42 pm

timmydownawell wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:59 pm
Username Taken wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:56 pm
Wanker Wat wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 8:27 pm
I can’t see that anything else is on that circuit. I tried adjusting to less than full heat but it still trips it. I tried showering in the dark. Didn’t help.

What does work is turning off the water /box every 45 seconds for about ten seconds, but this is not an ideal way to shower .

I did mention it to the landlord, how would this be fixed anyway? Is it easy or a big fix?
Had a similar problem years back. Fixed by upgrading the fuse in the breaker/fuse box from something like 10 Amp to 15 or 20 (can't remember).
You could cause a fire by doing that if the wiring is not up to it.
I didn't do the job. The landlady (from hell) organized a Sparkie to do it. Then she expected me to pay for it. Which I didn't. (We moved out instead).

:plus1:
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by Fourkinnel » Sat Jan 05, 2019 12:49 pm

I've had an unpleasant buzz from the water feed metal pipe in Happiness GH PP, told them 3 times to fix it. Still not sure if they did.
The worst death traps are what's known as a suicide shower similar to this pic. Still common and fitting them in Philippines.

Image

Image
SlowJoe
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by SlowJoe » Sat Jan 05, 2019 6:17 pm

explorer wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:15 pm
The only way to know would be to get an electrician (who knows what he is doing) to look at it.

Is it the circuit breaker on the heater, or a circuit breaker supplying power to the heater?

If it is a circuit breaker supplying power to the heater, it could be fixed by running larger wires from the main switchboard to the heater, and a circuit breaker which trips at a higher amps.

Most buildings in Cambodia dont have earth wires, and the wires they have are thinner than used in Australia. The only way to fix some buildings would be to rewire the building. When you see the other things wrong in some buildings, the only way to fix them all would be to demolish the building and build a new one.
You sound like youre trying to sound smarter than you are and its really irritating.
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by Anchor Moy » Sat Jan 05, 2019 7:09 pm

Fourkinnel wrote:
Sat Jan 05, 2019 12:49 pm
I've had an unpleasant buzz from the water feed metal pipe in Happiness GH PP, told them 3 times to fix it. Still not sure if they did.
The worst death traps are what's known as a suicide shower similar to this pic. Still common and fitting them in Philippines.

Image

Image
The top one looks like a death trap. I'd rather do without a shower. Scary as hell. :head shot:
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by Api » Sat Jan 05, 2019 7:52 pm

This question in the subject of this thread has made me to sign to this forum,so I can answer:
it is not normal!it is criminal!
however in SEAsia and some other IIIWorld countries it is very common.
So,entering shower with electric heater - we are risking electric shock or even life.
Couple of years ago young couple from Sweden lost life together in shower in Phuket.There were jokes on forum -* what
they were doing in shower together?* - she was taking shower alone,got shock,started to scream and he rushed to rescue!
and he did everything wrong: instead of cutting electricity he grabbed her and ended up sharing electric shock ,death was slow and painful.
I was well aware of the situation,so when we bought new heater- price included instalation- I watched myself,that it would be done properly.If you open the heater,you may see big screw to connect the ground,with big,red colour warning.
They did not do it!when I complained,they said that ground is not necessary,because the heater works well without ground
and eagerly they demonstrated it!It left me speechless,they were from serious electric contractor and looked like trained
technicians with uniforms and stuff..I had to do it myself.
so,do it yourself,do not trust buggers!
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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by Username Taken » Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:26 pm

Api wrote:
Sat Jan 05, 2019 7:52 pm
they said that ground is not necessary,because the heater works well without ground
What they really meant was that the entire house is not grounded. There is no third green wire going anywhere.
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

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Re: Is it normal for electric shower heaters not to be grounded?

Post by beaker » Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:04 am

Install a GFCI outlet then plug your heater into that, easy, cheap protection.

Image

A GFCI outlet is an electrical outlet which is designed to protect people from deadly electric shock. In addition to preventing electrocution, GFCI outlets can also reduce the risk of house fires caused by electrical problems, and reduce damage to appliances caused by faulty electrical circuits. These outlets use ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI or GFI) technology; it is also possible to install a GFCI at the breaker box, or to use a portable GFCI device.

The way in which these outlets work is rather ingenious. The GFCI outlet monitors the flow of energy through the circuit. If an imbalance between the “hot” and “neutral” poles in the circuit occurs, indicating that there is a ground fault, the outlet trips off. Ground faults can be caused by a wide variety of things, including a human being touching an energized part of the circuit, and this can be deadly. A classic example of a ground fault which has been utilized as a plot device in numerous films is a hair dryer which falls into the bathtub, turning the water in the tub into part of the electrical circuit and electrocuting the unfortunate occupant.
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