British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by Anthony's Weiner »

talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:40 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:00 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:56 am
phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:20 am I've had dengue, and have never taken any precautions ...day or night from getting bit again.

what ya going to do, live in a bubble ur whole life??
You’re either contributing to the solution or you’re contributing to the problem. Sadly you’re the latter.
As dengue is not communicable how would PR be contributing to the spread of the disease? Even having a dengue vaccine does not prevent the spread of Dengue fever
It’s not communicable between humans. But if you become infected with dengue, any mosquito that bites you carries that virus from your blood to the next bite victim. So by not protecting yourself and preventing mosquito bites, you are making yourself available as a carrier, further contributing to the ongoing epidemic. You may have asymptomatic dengue, meaning you won’t have any symptoms, feel ill, or otherwise know that you have the virus but you still may be spreading it.
I am aware of all that you say. I just believe there is a difference between not taking precautions and not seeking treatment. I guess my analogy would be not wearing a seatbelt, yes you will be more severely injured in an accident but that doesn t increase the likelihood of being in an accident. As PR said, unless one lives like bubbleboy one is at risk of one of the many communicable diseases be it influenza or malaria, Lyme disease or ebola. My sister just beat Leukemia and still can not go to restaurants, grocery stores, shopping malls etc for fear that her weakened immune system would not see her through an infection. While walks in the park at night wearing a face mask preferable to death, if we were all to take every precaution to keep from catching a communicable disease the world's economy would grind to a halt.
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by talltuktuk »

phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:49 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:00 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:56 am
phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:20 am I've had dengue, and have never taken any precautions ...day or night from getting bit again.

what ya going to do, live in a bubble ur whole life??
You’re either contributing to the solution or you’re contributing to the problem. Sadly you’re the latter.
As dengue is not communicable how would PR be contributing to the spread of the disease? Even having a dengue vaccine does not prevent the spread of Dengue fever
:facepalm:

I Think I am better than you as am not releasing antitoxins into the air with sprays and smoke coils
I might even be saving the planet as a by product
You may have asymptomatic dengue, meaning you won’t have any symptoms, feel ill, or otherwise know that you have the virus but you still may be spreading it.
So like i said, we should all live in a bubble? Thats the only way ur going to prevent a mossie biting you..

Hey good on ya if you want wear long pants & socks, long shirt, scarf, cover ur body in sprays, etc etc
which really dont help if ur bit on the face or ear

But you wont ever hear me say to you,
"Thanks for covering up" :beer3:
I got more detailed in my other replies but the gist of it is if you don’t protect yourself, then you’re contributing to the problem by being a carrier.

I wear DEET anytime I’m outside. I spend my life in SEA in shorts and a t-shirt. It takes me <30 seconds to apply it every few hours, or if I’m sweating it off. Consistently, the people I’m with get eaten alive by mosquitos yet still won’t do anything at all about it because, and I quote, they “just don’t care”. All of my friends know people who have had dengue, some minor some fatal. Still they don’t care. I almost died from a mosquito bite, now I’m vigilant and I don’t get bit. I’ve been in SEA for 18 months now and have sustained less than 5 mosquito bites. Adopting the mentality and lower standards of the locals is not helping with progress. I certainly don’t live in a bubble by any stretch. To each their own, we all make our own choices.
Cambodia: where money can buy you absolutely anything except intelligence.
talltuktuk
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by talltuktuk »

Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:54 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:40 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:00 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:56 am
phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:20 am I've had dengue, and have never taken any precautions ...day or night from getting bit again.

what ya going to do, live in a bubble ur whole life??
You’re either contributing to the solution or you’re contributing to the problem. Sadly you’re the latter.
As dengue is not communicable how would PR be contributing to the spread of the disease? Even having a dengue vaccine does not prevent the spread of Dengue fever
It’s not communicable between humans. But if you become infected with dengue, any mosquito that bites you carries that virus from your blood to the next bite victim. So by not protecting yourself and preventing mosquito bites, you are making yourself available as a carrier, further contributing to the ongoing epidemic. You may have asymptomatic dengue, meaning you won’t have any symptoms, feel ill, or otherwise know that you have the virus but you still may be spreading it.
I am aware of all that you say. I just believe there is a difference between not taking precautions and not seeking treatment. I guess my analogy would be not wearing a seatbelt, yes you will be more severely injured in an accident but that doesn t increase the likelihood of being in an accident. As PR said, unless one lives like bubbleboy one is at risk of one of the many communicable diseases be it influenza or malaria, Lyme disease or ebola. My sister just beat Leukemia and still can not go to restaurants, grocery stores, shopping malls etc for fear that her weakened immune system would not see her through an infection. While walks in the park at night wearing a face mask preferable to death, if we were all to take every precaution to keep from catching a communicable disease the world's economy would grind to a halt.
That’s not really an accurate comparison. Wearing a seatbelt has zero effect on whether or not another car will hit you. Wearing DEET has a overwhelmingly significant effect on reducing the likelyhood of getting bitten by a mosquito.

There has to be a standard between reducing risk and “living in a bubble”. And that standard should be a lot higher and more intelligent with those of us from developed, advanced countries.
Cambodia: where money can buy you absolutely anything except intelligence.
Anthony's Weiner
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by Anthony's Weiner »

talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 3:14 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:54 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:40 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:00 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:56 am

You’re either contributing to the solution or you’re contributing to the problem. Sadly you’re the latter.
As dengue is not communicable how would PR be contributing to the spread of the disease? Even having a dengue vaccine does not prevent the spread of Dengue fever
It’s not communicable between humans. But if you become infected with dengue, any mosquito that bites you carries that virus from your blood to the next bite victim. So by not protecting yourself and preventing mosquito bites, you are making yourself available as a carrier, further contributing to the ongoing epidemic. You may have asymptomatic dengue, meaning you won’t have any symptoms, feel ill, or otherwise know that you have the virus but you still may be spreading it.
I am aware of all that you say. I just believe there is a difference between not taking precautions and not seeking treatment. I guess my analogy would be not wearing a seatbelt, yes you will be more severely injured in an accident but that doesn t increase the likelihood of being in an accident. As PR said, unless one lives like bubbleboy one is at risk of one of the many communicable diseases be it influenza or malaria, Lyme disease or ebola. My sister just beat Leukemia and still can not go to restaurants, grocery stores, shopping malls etc for fear that her weakened immune system would not see her through an infection. While walks in the park at night wearing a face mask preferable to death, if we were all to take every precaution to keep from catching a communicable disease the world's economy would grind to a halt.
That’s not really an accurate comparison. Wearing a seatbelt has zero effect on whether or not another car will hit you. Wearing DEET has a overwhelmingly significant effect on reducing the likelyhood of getting bitten by a mosquito.

There has to be a standard between reducing risk and “living in a bubble”. And that standard should be a lot higher and more intelligent with those of us from developed, advanced countries.
DEET served as a long-term inhibitor to the response of the chemosensory organ to nurse bee headspace volatiles, whereas in honey bee, it caused short-term inhibition of antenna response to queen volatiles. Again, I am aware it keeps mosquitoes away and it does wonders for the bee population that we all need to pollinate gardens and fruits.

As to us from developed, advanced countries, we both come from the USA. Home to the world's largest pesticide industry, so advanced that we manufacture and sell pesticides to other countries that are so toxic that they are illegal to sell to our own citizens. Be careful not to fall off your high horse, my friend. Hospitals are filled with antibiotic infectious diseases.
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by BR549 »

I went to Zambia for almost 3 weeks in 2004 and had my shots..My brother, who lived there, got me some malaria pills. We were out in the bush and his friend said to roll up the windows we were entering tsetse fly country..My brother had his window cracked while he smoked a butt. I was in the back. I felt a sharp bite and my left hand grabbed a fucking tsetse fly that had blown through the window..it was like an armored car.
I tried to crush it with my finger and thumb and had to smash the shit out of it.
I was freaking out for a few days.
I guess I have been lucky in Cambodia and Thailand..The past 4 years I have not gotten dengue or any other mosquito borne illness.
Ticks are very bad here in Kansas and will fuck you up with lyme disease and more..fatal diseases even.
I do wonder why more Khmer places don't have window screens and screen doors.
My wife will be swatting mosquitoes and I will suggest she close the door.
I have spent a lot of time along the coast ..and Siem Reap and Kampong Cham...been lucky.
My wife's baby nephew has had the dengue and it scared the shit out of all of them.
The clinics need to be out where the people in rural communities can have access..these people do not have the money to go to PP or SR to the children's hospitals.
The standing water everywhere sure doesn't help.
It is cold as fuck here and I can't wait to get home to Siem Reap. I have been looking at indoor bug zappers on Amazon.
Good luck everyone.
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by clutchcargo »

talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 3:05 pm
phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:49 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:00 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:56 am
phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:20 am I've had dengue, and have never taken any precautions ...day or night from getting bit again.

what ya going to do, live in a bubble ur whole life??
You’re either contributing to the solution or you’re contributing to the problem. Sadly you’re the latter.
As dengue is not communicable how would PR be contributing to the spread of the disease? Even having a dengue vaccine does not prevent the spread of Dengue fever
:facepalm:

I Think I am better than you as am not releasing antitoxins into the air with sprays and smoke coils
I might even be saving the planet as a by product
You may have asymptomatic dengue, meaning you won’t have any symptoms, feel ill, or otherwise know that you have the virus but you still may be spreading it.
So like i said, we should all live in a bubble? Thats the only way ur going to prevent a mossie biting you..

Hey good on ya if you want wear long pants & socks, long shirt, scarf, cover ur body in sprays, etc etc
which really dont help if ur bit on the face or ear

But you wont ever hear me say to you,
"Thanks for covering up" :beer3:
I got more detailed in my other replies but the gist of it is if you don’t protect yourself, then you’re contributing to the problem by being a carrier.

I wear DEET anytime I’m outside. I spend my life in SEA in shorts and a t-shirt. It takes me <30 seconds to apply it every few hours, or if I’m sweating it off. Consistently, the people I’m with get eaten alive by mosquitos yet still won’t do anything at all about it because, and I quote, they “just don’t care”. All of my friends know people who have had dengue, some minor some fatal. Still they don’t care. I almost died from a mosquito bite, now I’m vigilant and I don’t get bit. I’ve been in SEA for 18 months now and have sustained less than 5 mosquito bites. Adopting the mentality and lower standards of the locals is not helping with progress. I certainly don’t live in a bubble by any stretch. To each their own, we all make our own choices.
Yeah, after Mrs Cargo got dengue 6 mths ago, seems to me sensible to take steps to minimise the risk of getting bitten for both yourself but also to help preventing it spreading for others. Since that incident, both of us have been more vigilant about prevention by either covering up or using repellant at the prevalent times of the day but of course, it's hard to prevent 24/7. Got one of those electronic mozzie zappers for the apartment and it gets many but not all.

Doesn't mean 'living in a bubble' in my book..just taking sensible precautions to reduce risk.

There are 4 types of Dengue but also a number of other mosquito viruses/diseases one can catch..this makes sobering reading https://www.pasteur-kh.org/arboviral-diseases/

Also, there are other alternatives to DEET such as citronella and such like (but usually smell strong).
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by Yerg »

clutchcargo wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 5:36 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 3:05 pm
phuketrichard wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:49 pm
Anthony's Weiner wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:00 pm
talltuktuk wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 11:56 am

You’re either contributing to the solution or you’re contributing to the problem. Sadly you’re the latter.
As dengue is not communicable how would PR be contributing to the spread of the disease? Even having a dengue vaccine does not prevent the spread of Dengue fever
:facepalm:

I Think I am better than you as am not releasing antitoxins into the air with sprays and smoke coils
I might even be saving the planet as a by product
You may have asymptomatic dengue, meaning you won’t have any symptoms, feel ill, or otherwise know that you have the virus but you still may be spreading it.
So like i said, we should all live in a bubble? Thats the only way ur going to prevent a mossie biting you..

Hey good on ya if you want wear long pants & socks, long shirt, scarf, cover ur body in sprays, etc etc
which really dont help if ur bit on the face or ear

But you wont ever hear me say to you,
"Thanks for covering up" :beer3:
I got more detailed in my other replies but the gist of it is if you don’t protect yourself, then you’re contributing to the problem by being a carrier.

I wear DEET anytime I’m outside. I spend my life in SEA in shorts and a t-shirt. It takes me <30 seconds to apply it every few hours, or if I’m sweating it off. Consistently, the people I’m with get eaten alive by mosquitos yet still won’t do anything at all about it because, and I quote, they “just don’t care”. All of my friends know people who have had dengue, some minor some fatal. Still they don’t care. I almost died from a mosquito bite, now I’m vigilant and I don’t get bit. I’ve been in SEA for 18 months now and have sustained less than 5 mosquito bites. Adopting the mentality and lower standards of the locals is not helping with progress. I certainly don’t live in a bubble by any stretch. To each their own, we all make our own choices.
Yeah, after Mrs Cargo got dengue 6 mths ago, seems to me sensible to take steps to minimise the risk of getting bitten for both yourself but also to help preventing it spreading for others. Since that incident, both of us have been more vigilant about prevention by either covering up or using repellant at the prevalent times of the day but of course, it's hard to prevent 24/7. Got one of those electronic mozzie zappers for the apartment and it gets many but not all.

Doesn't mean 'living in a bubble' in my book..just taking sensible precautions to reduce risk.

There are 4 types of Dengue but also a number of other mosquito viruses/diseases one can catch..this makes sobering reading https://www.pasteur-kh.org/arboviral-diseases/

Also, there are other alternatives to DEET such as citronella and such like (but usually smell strong).
I'm a mozzie magnet, and always find citronella a useful barrier. But it does pong!
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clutchcargo
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by clutchcargo »

I'm a mozzie magnet, and always find citronella a useful barrier. But it does pong!
Me same you. Are you a regular beer drinker? Dunno if true or not but I heard somewhere that that attracts the biters.. Maybe switch to wine :lol:
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by pczz »

clutchcargo wrote: Thu Jan 02, 2020 6:16 pm
I'm a mozzie magnet, and always find citronella a useful barrier. But it does pong!
Me same you. Are you a regular beer drinker? Dunno if true or not but I heard somewhere that that attracts the biters.. Maybe switch to wine :lol:
I heard similar thing about diabetes. apparently Diabetes sufferers excrete excess sugar in their sweat and it attracts mossies.
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Re: British Woman Contracts Fatal Disease From Cambodian Mosquito Bite

Post by Anthony's Weiner »

7 reasons mosquitoes bite some people more than others

Apparel
As mentioned above, mosquitoes actually use their eyes to target victims.

Blood Type
Type O blood is found to be twice as attractive to mosquitoes than those with Type A blood; Type B people were in the middle.

Gas
Mosquitoes can sense carbon dioxide up to 160 feet away; so the more one exhales, the more attractive they become. Larger people exhale more.

Heat and sweat
Mosquitoes apparently have a nose for other scents besides carbon dioxide; they can sniff down victims through lactic acid, uric acid, ammonia and other compounds emitted in sweat.

Lively skin
Some research has shown that the types and amount of bacteria on one’s skin can play a role in bringing on the mosquitoes as well.

Pregnancy
Some species are evidently more attracted to pregnant women than women who are not. One study in Africa found that pregnant women are twice as attractive to malaria-carrying mosquitoes as non-pregnant women

Beer
In one study researchers found that significantly more mosquitoes landed on study participants after drinking a 12-ounce beer than before.

So beer-drinking pregnant women who don t bathe regularly, are mouth breathers and have type O blood are not the kind of women you want to sit beside on a warm night if you are wearing bright clothes. I do my part to stop the spread of dengue fever, others wear DEET.

https://www.treehugger.com/health/7-rea ... thers.html
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