Banksy- art makes you think

This is a part of our Cambodia forums to chat about anything Cambodia-related. This discussion forum is at the top of our site because it's usually the busiest part of the expat community chatter with random topics on just about everything, including expat life, Khmer politics, Cambodian blogs we have or have come across, or whatever else our members want to discuss. Whether you're an expatriate, tourist, Cambodian or random traveler just passing through South East Asia, you are welcome to talk about anything or start new topics yourselves.
User avatar
AndyKK
Expatriate
Posts: 3264
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:32 am
Reputation: 1039
Great Britain

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by AndyKK » Tue Dec 10, 2019 6:26 am

angsta wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:46 am
SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 7:02 am
John Bingham wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:29 pm
None of his stuff could ever make the impact that the $120,000 Banana Duct Taped to a Wall did:
https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/b ... index.html
Now that ^^ is pure street art. (not a pretty picture with a nice warm fuzzy motif)
- by both the installer and the thief.

Add; i talked to a really good spray painter from the mean streets one time - about this very thing.
He said he lets go of his pieces the second he finishes them.
If he was handed a million dollars for one of his works, he admitted he would probably take it - but live in shame for the rest of his life and never paint again. I think he meant it, sincerely and strongly, he was a real street artist.
He was a real writer. Street art is basically the disabled brother of graffiti. Art school failures that think legally painting stencils on walls are a short cut to cash money. Writers paint for themselves and other writers and not to sell the first thing they do. Banksy painted trains before he started using stencils which is where he came up with the idea of stenciling his work. He also painted and stenciled London tubes.
I would imagine why "Banksy" used a stencil was -
1. The stencil is a mask, although a little more basic in terms, but just what a spray painter would do if he was using two colours, or protecting another area from the paint being applied (overspray).
2. Banksy being who he was and what he did could have landed him in big trouble, so the stencil also was an aid to him, via speed, apply fast and leave.

One more thing on this subject, you quote - Spray Painter - Now would you consider that too be correct, (its not a trick question). Or on the other hand, why not - Paint Sprayer.

Graffiti is it Street Art or more of an underground illegal activity. (I am not saying it is not art). Basically its against the law, so it is a criminal act, damaging or defacing property and will see the offender in a court of law, and charged with the offence.
Where Street Art would probably have permission by the appropriate authorities, possibly a commissioned painting on someone's property, being the purpose to please the people, but it would be more certainly, be within the law, legal.

You mentioned Thai artists, take a look at this Thai artist I was linked to this guy by a Khmer acquaintance in a photo club, and he is heading in the same direction.

angsta you seem to enjoy art, its nice to know.

Buktan Hummen, digital artist from Thailand



"The most important kind of freedom is to be what you really are. You trade in your reality for a role. You give up your ability to feel, and in exchange, put on a mask." ~ Jim Morrison



"Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free." ~ Jim Morrison
Always "hope" but never "expect".
User avatar
AndyKK
Expatriate
Posts: 3264
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:32 am
Reputation: 1039
Great Britain

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by AndyKK » Tue Dec 10, 2019 6:44 pm

This is the problem with so called graffiti art, the artwork here just does not give me a feeling of insparation.

Image

Graffiti House, Kingston-upon-Hull, UK
This former council home is located in Kingston-upon-Hull, East Yorkshire in England. Local graffiti artists have taken the facade into their own hands, creating a unique canvas. The Bankside Gallery project was a way for Hull City Council to improve the visual draw of unsightly properties across the city.
Always "hope" but never "expect".
User avatar
angsta
Expatriate
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu May 15, 2014 7:54 am
Reputation: 62
Saudi Arabia

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by angsta » Tue Dec 10, 2019 7:19 pm

AndyKK wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 6:26 am
angsta wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:46 am
SternAAlbifrons wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 7:02 am
John Bingham wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:29 pm
None of his stuff could ever make the impact that the $120,000 Banana Duct Taped to a Wall did:
https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/b ... index.html
Now that ^^ is pure street art. (not a pretty picture with a nice warm fuzzy motif)
- by both the installer and the thief.

Add; i talked to a really good spray painter from the mean streets one time - about this very thing.
He said he lets go of his pieces the second he finishes them.
If he was handed a million dollars for one of his works, he admitted he would probably take it - but live in shame for the rest of his life and never paint again. I think he meant it, sincerely and strongly, he was a real street artist.
He was a real writer. Street art is basically the disabled brother of graffiti. Art school failures that think legally painting stencils on walls are a short cut to cash money. Writers paint for themselves and other writers and not to sell the first thing they do. Banksy painted trains before he started using stencils which is where he came up with the idea of stenciling his work. He also painted and stenciled London tubes.
I would imagine why "Banksy" used a stencil was -
1. The stencil is a mask, although a little more basic in terms, but just what a spray painter would do if he was using two colours, or protecting another area from the paint being applied (overspray).
2. Banksy being who he was and what he did could have landed him in big trouble, so the stencil also was an aid to him, via speed, apply fast and leave.

One more thing on this subject, you quote - Spray Painter - Now would you consider that too be correct, (its not a trick question). Or on the other hand, why not - Paint Sprayer.

Graffiti is it Street Art or more of an underground illegal activity. (I am not saying it is not art). Basically its against the law, so it is a criminal act, damaging or defacing property and will see the offender in a court of law, and charged with the offence.
Where Street Art would probably have permission by the appropriate authorities, possibly a commissioned painting on someone's property, being the purpose to please the people, but it would be more certainly, be within the law, legal.

You mentioned Thai artists, take a look at this Thai artist I was linked to this guy by a Khmer acquaintance in a photo club, and he is heading in the same direction.

angsta you seem to enjoy art, its nice to know.



"Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free." ~ Jim Morrison
Banksy was apparently hiding under a train after being chased by the police and saw the way rolling stock had its identification and number attached as a plate to the steel of the train carriage. He decided that this was a quicker and less risky way to get his name up and started designed stencils. As you say using a stencil means that he could hit much more prominent spots in the middle of cities rather than just leaving a generic 'tag'. The 'One Nation Under CCTV' piece is a prime example, I went to one of his first exhibitions on Clink Street in 2001. He wasn't that famous when he started stenciling although he did organise the 'Walls on Fire' exhibition in Bristol in 2000.
Most writers would consider themselves vandals first and possibly artists second. Most Street Artists have never even painted illegally and only use permission walls. Thats a major difference. In Thailand lots of writers have a background in tattooing hence all the character based pieces. I like the writer 'Leo TMC' from Korat.
User avatar
AndyKK
Expatriate
Posts: 3264
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:32 am
Reputation: 1039
Great Britain

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by AndyKK » Tue Dec 10, 2019 8:47 pm

Image
He also was I would say a political artist of the times. Possibly anti government, freedom rights for the people.

Graffiti artist Banksy unmasked ... as a former public schoolboy from middle-class suburbia

He is perhaps the most famous, or infamous, artist alive. To some a genius, to others a vandal. Always controversial, he inspires admiration and provokes outrage in equal measure.
Since Banksy made his name with his trademark stencil-style 'guerrilla' art in public spaces - on walls in London, Brighton, Bristol and even on the West Bank barrier separating Israelis and Palestinians - his works have sold for hundreds of thousands of pounds.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/arti ... urbia.html

I was aware of some of his works, and had even seen some. I think at the time I had work in the Bristol area.

Old video surfaces of Banksy painting in 'broad daylight' in Bristol
A 20-year-old video from the now-iconic 'Walls on Fire' event has emerged

https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bris ... ng-1944146

'Leo TMC' from Korat. The artist you quoted of above, I think also very brave of the painters "taggers" in Thailand, with the laws being very opposed to Graffiti.



In reference too, the Thai artist I quoted, Buktan Hummen, digital artist from Thailand is from Nakhon Ratchasima Korat.

Always "hope" but never "expect".
User avatar
John Bingham
Expatriate
Posts: 7956
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:26 pm
Reputation: 3765
Yemen

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by John Bingham » Tue Dec 10, 2019 9:49 pm

Banksy is popular because the message, although subversive, is very easily understood.

I remember seeing this one appearing in London in the early 2000s, I found it hilarious.
Image

I did my fair bit of graffiti/ vandalism in my wayward youth. I even got into making stencils because they were easier to put up quickly while doing a freehand piece could take a lot of time and you were likely to be apprehended. My stencils were too small and detailed too though with confusing messages. Many young Cambodians interested in art who I talk with seem to like his work, it has a populist appeal.
User avatar
angsta
Expatriate
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu May 15, 2014 7:54 am
Reputation: 62
Saudi Arabia

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by angsta » Tue Dec 10, 2019 9:56 pm

AndyKK wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 8:47 pm
Image
He also was I would say a political artist of the times. Possibly anti government, freedom rights for the people.

Graffiti artist Banksy unmasked ... as a former public schoolboy from middle-class suburbia

He is perhaps the most famous, or infamous, artist alive. To some a genius, to others a vandal. Always controversial, he inspires admiration and provokes outrage in equal measure.
Since Banksy made his name with his trademark stencil-style 'guerrilla' art in public spaces - on walls in London, Brighton, Bristol and even on the West Bank barrier separating Israelis and Palestinians - his works have sold for hundreds of thousands of pounds.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/arti ... urbia.html

I was aware of some of his works, and had even seen some. I think at the time I had work in the Bristol area.

Old video surfaces of Banksy painting in 'broad daylight' in Bristol
A 20-year-old video from the now-iconic 'Walls on Fire' event has emerged

https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bris ... ng-1944146

'Leo TMC' from Korat. The artist you quoted of above, I think also very brave of the painters "taggers" in Thailand, with the laws being very opposed to Graffiti.



In reference too, the Thai artist I quoted, Buktan Hummen, digital artist from Thailand is from Nakhon Ratchasima Korat.

Yeah that was just off Oxford Street. I am pretty sure its gone now. The YouTube video of the real Banksy is the one in Jamaica where he is painting King Tubby's or Jah Shaka's studio. His name is Robin Guttheridge or something like that. He also did a famous blockbuster monkey piece on the ledge, a track side in Royal Oak, London.

The law in Thailand might claim to be strict but a bribe usually does the trick.

User avatar
angsta
Expatriate
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu May 15, 2014 7:54 am
Reputation: 62
Saudi Arabia

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by angsta » Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:06 pm

John Bingham wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 9:49 pm
Banksy is popular because the message, although subversive, is very easily understood.

I remember seeing this one appearing in London in the early 2000s, I found it hilarious.
Image

I did my fair bit of graffiti/ vandalism in my wayward youth. I even got into making stencils because they were easier to put up quickly while doing a freehand piece could take a lot of time and you were likely to be apprehended. My stencils were too small and detailed too though with confusing messages. Many young Cambodians interested in art who I talk with seem to like his work, it has a populist appeal.
http://jdorange.blogspot.com/2008/07/ba ... anksy.html
User avatar
John Bingham
Expatriate
Posts: 7956
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:26 pm
Reputation: 3765
Yemen

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by John Bingham » Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:56 pm

I saw that when it came out. I don't really care who Banksy is, it's just amusing having a public figure/ well-known artist whose pieces sell for millions with such mystery around them.
User avatar
Ghostwriter
Expatriate
Posts: 659
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:01 am
Reputation: 435
France

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by Ghostwriter » Wed Dec 11, 2019 1:30 am

Image

Withus Oragainstus specimen pinned on a US museum wall.

Brilliant.
User avatar
SternAAlbifrons
Expatriate
Posts: 3393
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 am
Reputation: 2038
Location: Gilligan's Island
Pitcairn Island

Re: Banksy- art makes you think

Post by SternAAlbifrons » Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:02 am

I see on this thread the words vandal, illegal, graffiti, mentioned, i see all kinds of interesting info and eye-opening ways of looking at this art. Fab.
But I am a little surprised not to see any mention of the words "revolutionary act".
To me, that is a a crucial component of street art.
Otherwise it is just public decoration.

"Artistically" i personally do not like most modern-graffiti style of street art - that blocky stuff. Much of it is hideous (to me)
But i appreciate the fact that it is a big kick-back at The MAchine. and i love that.

Tutters of defacing public or private property leave cold.
Advertisers have already hijacked our "visual amenity" with wall to wall commercial crap. Governments sell, deface and destroy our our natural and cultural heritage every day.
I have always seen even tagging and poor quality spray jobs not as "vandalism" but as asymmetric warfare.

Bansky leaves me cold these days too.
Sure, I like his decorations - accessibly warm fuzzy and feel-good. Catchy motifs and themes but he is part of The MAchine now. imo. About as revolutionary as a Benetton billboard.
Somebody worth tagging -even in a gallery.
:stir:
i like Angst's word "writer" - it implies sending a message.

PS, i see The Ghost's post just pop up ^^^ A fab depiction, and act, of street-art as asymmetric warfare.
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post