We are guests in this country

This is a part of our Cambodia forums to chat about anything Cambodia-related. This discussion forum is at the top of our site because it's usually the busiest part of the expat community chatter with random topics on just about everything, including expat life, Khmer politics, Cambodian blogs we have or have come across, or whatever else our members want to discuss. Whether you're an expatriate, tourist, Cambodian or random traveler just passing through South East Asia, you are welcome to talk about anything or start new topics yourselves.
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JBTrain
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by JBTrain » Thu Jun 26, 2014 8:08 am

Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
giblet wrote:Good point. In most (all?) of the countries that we come from, an immigrant can gain citizenship after a certain number of years and participate in the political process. It's not the same here.
Germany still has a very similar (seemingly identical? I'm using my phone so don't like clicking links) "citizenship by blood" policy. They've changed it a bit, but you could live in Germany for years, speak fluent German and so forth, but wouldn't be able to become a citizen, nor would your German-born children. Getting citizenship was/is damn hard. Until very recently, it didn't go by time spent there like in other countries.
Cambodia is not unique in that regard. It is unusual in historically calling out particular nationalities (Vietnamese and Chinese) as being excluded from the path to naturalization.
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OrangeDragon
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by OrangeDragon » Thu Jun 26, 2014 8:27 pm

JBTrain wrote:
Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
giblet wrote:Good point. In most (all?) of the countries that we come from, an immigrant can gain citizenship after a certain number of years and participate in the political process. It's not the same here.
Germany still has a very similar (seemingly identical? I'm using my phone so don't like clicking links) "citizenship by blood" policy. They've changed it a bit, but you could live in Germany for years, speak fluent German and so forth, but wouldn't be able to become a citizen, nor would your German-born children. Getting citizenship was/is damn hard. Until very recently, it didn't go by time spent there like in other countries.
Cambodia is not unique in that regard. It is unusual in historically calling out particular nationalities (Vietnamese and Chinese) as being excluded from the path to naturalization.
Not completely unique about it though:
Passed before the heated immigration debates of the 1990s, the Immigration Act of 1990 reflects congressional concerns with the racial composition of the immigrant stream. The law created a new immigrant visa program that effectively represents affirmative action for white immigrants, a group that benefitted from preferential treatment under the national origins quota system until 1965. Congress, in an ironic twist of political jargon, established the "diversity" visa program, which though facially neutral prefers immigrants from nations populated primarily by white people. As congressional proponents envisioned, many Irish immigrated under the program. Indeed, a transitional diversity program required that forty percent of the visas would be issued to Irish immigrants. In fiscal year 1995, the leading source of immigrants under the permanent diversity visa program was Poland.
http://academic.udayton.edu/race/02rights/immigr09.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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ali baba
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by ali baba » Thu Jun 26, 2014 9:41 pm

Looks like LTO has abandoned the thread.
Disappointing.
Scarier than malaria.
King Keil
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by King Keil » Thu Jun 26, 2014 9:54 pm

I would really like to see those links about german citizenship "by blood". Lived there for quite a long time and never heard of it.
thePeck
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by thePeck » Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:10 pm

As stated before, this is not my country, I'm an expatriate.

No matter the number of years I have spent her or the family I may come to squire. Even if they feel I may be Khmer because of living, speaking and breathing their culture.

Unlike other Western culture countries that are a melting pot of it's easier to become one. Here is not the case.

I even feel people of Khmer blood come back here I don't think they are the same either. Maybe a little bit more legit, but still different.

Should I as or Irish/English ancestry feel the right to go back to those respective countries and voice my concern? The answer is no.
OrangeDragon
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by OrangeDragon » Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:23 pm

Khmer vs Cambodian. There's a difference there that people seem to forget frequently. You can never become Khmer, it's a race. Cambodian is a nationality.
bong.kuit
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by bong.kuit » Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:29 pm

King Keil wrote:I would really like to see those links about german citizenship "by blood". Lived there for quite a long time and never heard of it.
"Between 1995 and 2004, 1,278,424 people have obtained German citizenship by naturalization. This means that about 1.5% of the total German population had been naturalized during that period."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_nat ... statistics" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
OrangeDragon
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by OrangeDragon » Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:40 pm

giblet wrote:Good point. In most (all?) of the countries that we come from, an immigrant can gain citizenship after a certain number of years and participate in the political process. It's not the same here.
It is the same here actually... it's just complicated by corruption to the point the process breaks down. That and most people won't go through the required steps, which our countries also have, for gaining citizenship. Becoming fluent in the language, knowledgable enough to pass the test, etc.
ARTICLE 8:
Foreigners who may apply for naturalization shall fulfil the following conditions:

1. Shall have a paper certifying that he/she has good behaviour and moral conduct issued by the chief of
the commune (Khum) or district (Sangkat) of his/her own residence. Will probably require a bribe or may just end up being impossible to get.

2. Shall have a letter of certification of past criminal records which stated that he/she had never been
previously convicted of any criminal offense.

3. Shall have a document certifying that such person has his/her residence in the Kingdom of Cambodia
and been living continuously for seven (7) years from the date of reception of the residence card which
was issued under the framework of the Law on Immigration. Still haven't seen how one gets a residence card...

4. Shall have residence in the Kingdom of Cambodia when applying for naturalization.

5. Shall be able to speak Khmer, know Khmer scripts and has some knowledge of Khmer history and
prove evidence clearly that he/she can live in harmony in Khmer society as well as can accept good
Khmer customs and traditions. This is the step that a lot of people won't do, which isn't that unlike similar exams in the US citizenship program.

6. Shall have his/her mentality and physical aptitude that will neither cause danger nor burden to the
nation. Will probably require a bribe or may just end up being impossible to get.
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Joon
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by Joon » Fri Jun 27, 2014 4:35 am

ali baba wrote:Looks like LTO has abandoned the thread.
Disappointing.
You have to stop assuming that people are tuned to forums 24/7 and will respond within the next 24 hours.
It's an interesting thread and everybody's chipping in. LTO will chip in when he feels he wants to.
Disclaimer: I don't actually look like my avatar.
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LTO
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Re: We are guests in this country

Post by LTO » Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:55 am

LTO is 24 hours into a 33-hour plane and airport experience and will get back to chattering on Internet eventually.
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"Kafka is 'outdone' in our country, the new fatherland of Angkor" - Norodom Sihanouk
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