Translation questions

Have questions or resources regarding Khmer Culture? This forum is all about the Kingdom of Cambodia's culture. Khmer language, Cambodian weddings, French influence, Cambodian architecture, Cambodian politics, Khmer customs, etc? This is the place. Living in Cambodia can cause you to experience a whole new level of culture shock, so feel free to talk about all things related to the Khmer people, and their traditions. And if you want something in Khmer script translated into English, you will probably find what you need.
User avatar
CKDewey
Tourist
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 28, 2014 9:06 am
Reputation: 0

Re: Translation questions

Post by CKDewey »

Username Taken wrote:
Jaap N. wrote:
sanjuro wrote:^I thought that was "ba" & "cha"...
Misinformed you: 'nung-ai' is for both man and women.
'Baat' is for men and 'cha' for women. Sorry for the confusion.
'nung-ai' is not interchangeable with 'baht' or 'ja/cha'.

'nung-ai' does meant 'yes', but, as in 'yes I agree with you'.
I think OP is hearing 'neung haeay.' It is an affirmation and its meaning is akin to 'absolutely,' 'exactly,' 'surely,' 'positively,' 'for sure,' 'that's it,' 'right on,' 'hell yeah!' etc.
milkncereal
Tourist
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed May 28, 2014 7:59 am
Reputation: 0

Re: Translation questions

Post by milkncereal »

CKDewey wrote:
Username Taken wrote:
Jaap N. wrote:
sanjuro wrote:^I thought that was "ba" & "cha"...
Misinformed you: 'nung-ai' is for both man and women.
'Baat' is for men and 'cha' for women. Sorry for the confusion.
'nung-ai' is not interchangeable with 'baht' or 'ja/cha'.

'nung-ai' does meant 'yes', but, as in 'yes I agree with you'.
I think OP is hearing 'neung haeay.' It is an affirmation and its meaning is akin to 'absolutely,' 'exactly,' 'surely,' 'positively,' 'for sure,' 'that's it,' 'right on,' 'hell yeah!' etc.
Thats it! exactly right on...hells yeah. :hattip:
User avatar
Joon
Expatriate
Posts: 568
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 3:02 pm
Reputation: 3
Location: M'Penh.
Cambodia

Re: Translation questions

Post by Joon »

StroppyChops wrote:
Rama wrote:And I don't expect StroppyChops will ever have to read or talk about any of the above. You might as well scribble it out of the alphabet it's an obsolete letter you'll never encounter, except during the first few months of learning the alphabet.
So effectively the word is used to demonstrate a letter that is no longer used, to children that will never use it? Cambodia.
The letter is archaic, yes. You won't encounter it in everyday language, except maybe in words with ancient roots and proper nouns. Although words that start with this letter are very rare as pointed out by Rama, I'm pretty sure I have encountered that letter in the middle of words.
So it is still used but very, very rarely.

Same deal with ឋ (ancient thor) though it is used more often than ឍ (ancient thô).
Disclaimer: I don't actually look like my avatar.
User avatar
Joon
Expatriate
Posts: 568
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 3:02 pm
Reputation: 3
Location: M'Penh.
Cambodia

Re: Translation questions

Post by Joon »

CKDewey wrote:
Username Taken wrote:
Jaap N. wrote:
sanjuro wrote:^I thought that was "ba" & "cha"...
Misinformed you: 'nung-ai' is for both man and women.
'Baat' is for men and 'cha' for women. Sorry for the confusion.
'nung-ai' is not interchangeable with 'baht' or 'ja/cha'.

'nung-ai' does meant 'yes', but, as in 'yes I agree with you'.
I think OP is hearing 'neung haeay.' It is an affirmation and its meaning is akin to 'absolutely,' 'exactly,' 'surely,' 'positively,' 'for sure,' 'that's it,' 'right on,' 'hell yeah!' etc.
CKDewey got it right.

The written and properly pronounced phrase is "neung haeay" (with an aspirated H) but slang and lazy tones make it sound as "neung-ai".
Disclaimer: I don't actually look like my avatar.
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10598
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1029
Australia

Re: Translation questions

Post by StroppyChops »

Joon wrote:The letter is archaic, yes. You won't encounter it in everyday language, except maybe in words with ancient roots and proper nouns. Although words that start with this letter are very rare as pointed out by Rama, I'm pretty sure I have encountered that letter in the middle of words.
So it is still used but very, very rarely.

Same deal with ឋ (ancient thor) though it is used more often than ឍ (ancient thô).
Thanks. Actually our tutor made a relevant comment yesterday when demonstrating "the old way" to write the Khmer for 'give' - that the grandparent generation use some characters, words and expressions that the youngest (literate) generation can't read. Thanks significant change - for obvious historical reasons - in just two generations.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
User avatar
Joon
Expatriate
Posts: 568
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 3:02 pm
Reputation: 3
Location: M'Penh.
Cambodia

Re: Translation questions

Post by Joon »

I love the Cambodian language, but it is becoming too archaic (as shown by the abandoned usage of some letters) and a little bit of a mess!

For instance, the alternate ways to write the SAME word: Samlor (soup) can be written សម្ល and សំឡ or the preposition "for" can be written សម្រាប់ and សំរាប់.

While I've been told that the "proper, official" way of writing is to use Ven. Choun Nath's rule of spelling (សម្ល and សម្រាប់ type of spelling), a lot of people says it doesn't matter as long as you keep consistent in your writing.
Disclaimer: I don't actually look like my avatar.
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10598
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1029
Australia

Re: Translation questions

Post by StroppyChops »

Yeah, this is the age old grammar versus communication debate. All (currently spoken) language is fluid and evolving, so where's the line between formal and too informal?
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
starkmonster
Expatriate
Posts: 129
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:45 pm
Reputation: 22

Re: Translation questions

Post by starkmonster »

Joon wrote:I love the Cambodian language, but it is becoming too archaic (as shown by the abandoned usage of some letters) and a little bit of a mess!

For instance, the alternate ways to write the SAME word: Samlor (soup) can be written សម្ល and សំឡ or the preposition "for" can be written សម្រាប់ and សំរាប់.

While I've been told that the "proper, official" way of writing is to use Ven. Choun Nath's rule of spelling (សម្ល and សម្រាប់ type of spelling), a lot of people says it doesn't matter as long as you keep consistent in your writing.
I wish English had this kind of flexibility, it would keep the spelling Nazis on this board in check.
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 95 guests