A Khmer expression

Have questions or resources regarding Khmer Culture? This forum is all about the Kingdom of Cambodia's culture. Khmer language, Cambodian weddings, French influence, Cambodian architecture, Cambodian politics, Khmer customs, etc? This is the place. Living in Cambodia can cause you to experience a whole new level of culture shock, so feel free to talk about all things related to the Khmer people, and their traditions. And if you want something in Khmer script translated into English, you will probably find what you need.
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13504
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1731
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:56 pm

taabarang wrote:
Sat Jun 17, 2017 3:59 pm
God damn it Father Punchy, you got me tied up against the ropes...."

Oops better reset that to cheese and crackers got all muddy. It wouldn't do to upset The Set of all Sets.

While I'm on the subject of markets another local Khmer usage comes to mind. The villagers tease me about only wanting to learn Khmer psar or psah which means colloquial

Khmer and they're right.

I'm certain colloquial has a more proper word, but I'll leave that to the monkeys, typewriters and The Set of all Sets.
sorry yeah i did miss this mate,
the closest translation i can get to "Colloquial" is
តាមភាសាសាមញ្ញ - Taam Piasaa Saamanh
which basically means - to speak the common language,
Taam doesnt actually mean speak it means more along the lines of to copy/imitate (someone) to take after (someone),
but in this context you can say they are copying (speaking) the common tongu.e

also a little of extra knowledge, there is another Psaa that sounds the same but without the khmer 'r' written,
ផ្សារ - Psar - Market
ផ្សា - Psaa - which means to hurt, be painful, endure or except (ones fate) (used often in Khmer songs) its also often associated with the burning stinging sensation (maybe from a bee sting, or the feeling of when citrus juice gets in a paper cut
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10587
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1001
Australia

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by StroppyChops » Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:58 pm

Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:56 pm
also a little of extra knowledge, there is another Psaa that sounds the same but without the khmer 'r' written,
ផ្សារ - Psar - Market
ផ្សា - Psaa - which means to hurt, be painful, endure or except (ones fate) (used often in Khmer songs) its also often associated with the burning stinging sensation (maybe from a bee sting, or the feeling of when citrus juice gets in a paper cut
Same pronunciation, Punchy?

Edit: ignore - saw the bit in bold after posting.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13504
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1731
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:09 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:58 pm
Jamie_Lambo wrote:
Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:56 pm
also a little of extra knowledge, there is another Psaa that sounds the same but without the khmer 'r' written,
ផ្សារ - Psar - Market
ផ្សា - Psaa - which means to hurt, be painful, endure or except (ones fate) (used often in Khmer songs) its also often associated with the burning stinging sensation (maybe from a bee sting, or the feeling of when citrus juice gets in a paper cut
Same pronunciation, Punchy?

Edit: ignore - saw the bit in bold after posting.
yeah pretty much mate
:thumb:
here (as you know i like to give audio examples when possible)...
you can here the word mentioned a couple of times in this song (very good song btw)

he says it at 1m 03s during the first verse, and again in the Chorus at 2mins

here are the lyrics for the use of the word...
អូនមានថ្មីហើយឱ្យបងខ្លោចផ្សា
Oun Mean Tmey Hauy Ouy Bong Klaoch Phsa
you have a new guy already which really hurts me

ឈឺផ្សាព្រោះស្នេហ៍កន្លង
Chur Phsa Pruah Snei Kanlong
this pain because the love has gone
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
taabarang
Expatriate
Posts: 3578
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 7:49 am
Reputation: 798
Location: Outside of Kampong Cham city
United States of America

Re: A Khmer expressionr. E

Post by taabarang » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:44 pm

For what it's worth most of the villagers where I live drop the "p" in psa. Eg. Nyom tau sah"
I'm going to the market. No pain involved.
As my old Cajun bait seller used to say, "I opes you luck.
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13504
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1731
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: A Khmer expressionr. E

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:57 pm

taabarang wrote:
Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:44 pm
For what it's worth most of the villagers where I live drop the "p" in psa. Eg. Nyom tau sah"
I'm going to the market. No pain involved.
yeah when speaking really colloquially words that start with a double consonant often the first gets dropped or so lightly spoken its near impossible to hear
eg
Khnyom - Nyom (I)
Psar - Saar (market)
Pteas - Teah (home)
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
taabarang
Expatriate
Posts: 3578
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 7:49 am
Reputation: 798
Location: Outside of Kampong Cham city
United States of America

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by taabarang » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:13 pm

Yeah, what is really strange to me is not where
"p"/gets dropped, but where it is added as a transitive substitute for " bong" preceding a verb. Eg. p'hian for bongrian. Go figure.
As my old Cajun bait seller used to say, "I opes you luck.
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13504
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1731
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:23 pm

taabarang wrote:
Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:13 pm
Yeah, what is really strange to me is not where
"p"/gets dropped, but where it is added as a transitive substitute for " bong" preceding a verb. Eg. p'hian for bongrian. Go figure.
are you talking about the word for teach/instruct/train? បង្រៀន Bongreun?
not sure im too familiar with this one,
but then again like most things in Khmer, you dont notice it until someone points it out
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
taabarang
Expatriate
Posts: 3578
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 7:49 am
Reputation: 798
Location: Outside of Kampong Cham city
United States of America

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by taabarang » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:42 pm

Yes that is the exact verb I mean. And it gets worse
An example from our village.

Ku p'hian hoap seuh. The teacher counts the students. And no I didn't forget the "r" in kru.

"but then again like most things in Khmer, you dont notice it until someone points it out.

What I' m pointing out is a dialect. I've no idea how widespread it is.
As my old Cajun bait seller used to say, "I opes you luck.
User avatar
Jamie_Lambo
The Cool Boxing Guy
Posts: 13504
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:34 am
Reputation: 1731
Location: Naklua
Contact:
Great Britain

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by Jamie_Lambo » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:58 pm

taabarang wrote:
Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:42 pm
Yes that is the exact verb I mean. And it gets worse
An example from our village.

Ku p'hian hoap seuh. The teacher counts the students. And no I didn't forget the "r" in kru.

"but then again like most things in Khmer, you dont notice it until someone points it out.

What I' m pointing out is a dialect. I've no idea how widespread it is.
haha yeah, the number five is the biggest victim from the lazy use of the R i think
:tophat: Mean Dtuk Mean Trei, Mean Loy Mean Srey
Punchy McShortstacks School of Hard Knocks :x
User avatar
StroppyChops
The Missionary Man
Posts: 10587
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 11:24 am
Reputation: 1001
Australia

Re: A Khmer expression

Post by StroppyChops » Sun Jun 18, 2017 10:37 pm

I'm constantly forgetting that a closing R is usually an H.

Any other teachers get called "cha" (contraction of teacher) by their students as a term of endearment/respect?
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
Post Reply Previous topicNext topic
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 38 guests