Cambodian Kitchens

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taabarang
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by taabarang » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:23 pm

PSD-Kiwi wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:17 pm
Normally after about 1500 the markets have freshly butchered meat, that's why locals usually go twice a day... Once early in the morning for their breakfast & lunch produce, and around 3-4 to get produce for their evening meals.
Except in small rural villages, either you get what you need in the morning or it's mii good
for supper. Local food stands serve only one meal-breakfast.
As my old Cajun bait seller used to say, "I opes you luck.
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by StroppyChops » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:38 pm

We buy pork and chicken from the local wet markets in the morning, and then it's either straight into the freezer or cooked and eaten that day - never been sick from it, but we have a good relationship with our meat sellers who only sell us the best/freshest, and seem to take very great pleasure in us repeatedly coming back. We don't eat Cambodian beef as it's not drained correctly and (unlike pork and chicken) will be sold for days after it's slaughtered.
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by vladimir » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:58 pm

Yeah, buying in the afternoon is asking for trouble
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by Luigi » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:27 pm

PSD-Kiwi wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:56 pm
Forgot to mention, the lack of fridges is obviously a throwback, but also because food is generally purchased fresh from the markets twice daily... Plus saves money on electricity bills. Anything that needs to be kept cold is usually kept in a chilly bin with ice.
No way is that a cost saving long run. No way. But your point is well taken. What is reality and what is perceived is often quite contrary.
As T. S. Elliot wrote:
Between the idea and the reality falls the shadow.
Works on mny levels.
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by Luigi » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:32 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:38 pm
We buy pork and chicken from the local wet markets in the morning, and then it's either straight into the freezer or cooked and eaten that day - never been sick from it, but we have a good relationship with our meat sellers who only sell us the best/freshest, and seem to take very great pleasure in us repeatedly coming back. We don't eat Cambodian beef as it's not drained correctly and (unlike pork and chicken) will be sold for days after it's slaughtered.
And if the cow, pig, duck, chicken, was sick & just died from whatever it we still be sold in the market place.
Caveat Emptor
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by Luigi » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:35 pm

Username Taken wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:04 pm
Luigi wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 12:54 pm
Thanks UT. So that grows in stagnant waters?
No. You will see it floating down the Tonle Sap, the Mekong, etc (it has purple flowers like a hyacynth).
OK. Doesn't fit the true sefinition of stagnat but fish & plant life growing in those waters....
Gotta be good right?
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by StroppyChops » Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:36 pm

Luigi wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:32 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:38 pm
We buy pork and chicken from the local wet markets in the morning, and then it's either straight into the freezer or cooked and eaten that day - never been sick from it, but we have a good relationship with our meat sellers who only sell us the best/freshest, and seem to take very great pleasure in us repeatedly coming back. We don't eat Cambodian beef as it's not drained correctly and (unlike pork and chicken) will be sold for days after it's slaughtered.
And if the cow, pig, duck, chicken, was sick & just died from whatever it we still be sold in the market place.
Caveat Emptor
I would have thought this was implied among seasoned expats, but okay. You're right.
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Re: Cambodian Kitchens

Post by Luigi » Sun Jul 09, 2017 10:01 pm

ha! My gf tells me of her mothers neighbor poisoning some pigs that at his rice plantings or his rice in shed. Not sure. Maybe both.
But the story ends with the pigs that were, were in the market the next day. Or at least that partr of the story. I theory the poison shut down their organs & never made it to the bacon. :shrug:
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