Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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John Bingham
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

Post by John Bingham »

Most graduates in the fields you are talking about are already working before they even finish their studies. They are in high demand and I can't see them going for a scheme like this that doesn't have similar benefits.
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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So, for it to work, it may require advertising before uni; or taking those who can't afford uni, and presenting it as an alternative, perhaps.
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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CaptainNemo wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 12:33 am I suppose I'm hoping for cheaper labour costs, and some motivation from someone that's a bit more than what I see in Thailand.
I think you're going to be disappointed. Many Khmer IT guys (low skilled) are getting paid pretty well despite their lack of initiative and inherent laziness.

JB is correct above, many are working before they graduate and if they are working then they don't need to attend university classes. They will get their uni degree simply because they paid the fees not due to passing their exams.

There is already a route for those who can't afford university. Passerelles Numériques Cambodia (PNC). The students from PNC all seem to be well motivated and thankful for the opportunity they have had. (Worth looking into).
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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Username Taken wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:02 am
CaptainNemo wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 12:33 am I suppose I'm hoping for cheaper labour costs, and some motivation from someone that's a bit more than what I see in Thailand.
I think you're going to be disappointed. Many Khmer IT guys (low skilled) are getting paid pretty well despite their lack of initiative and inherent laziness.

JB is correct above, many are working before they graduate and if they are working then they don't need to attend university classes. They will get their uni degree simply because they paid the fees not due to passing their exams.
Sounds worse than Thailand. I'm not looking for "IT guys", I'm looking for coding chicks, because I anticipate that they may have better habits.
I know how easy it is to be incredibly lazy in IT anywhere in the world; coding is a bit different - programmes won't code themselves, there are deadlines and qc to meet.
Username Taken wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:02 am There is already a route for those who can't afford university. Passerelles Numériques Cambodia (PNC). The students from PNC all seem to be well motivated and thankful for the opportunity they have had. (Worth looking into).
Thanks for that. That does look good. Maybe better than unis. I like the fact that they have a partner programme.
https://www.passerellesnumeriques.org/e ... r-partner/
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Passerelles numériques Cambodia also provides an intense curriculum to enhance graduates’ employability. Designed to match local company needs, it focuses on IT practice – via practical projects, English language, professional and soft skills (logical thinking, autonomy, initiative, etc.).

Students have the opportunity to put into practice their IT and soft skills during a four months internship at the end of the training.
https://www.passerellesnumeriques.org/e ... /cambodia/

It's networking and web development, so not the same thing that I'm interested in, but it's a good enough foundation to start learning C/C++/C#
CCNA R&S is a decent course, and would cost £1,000 at the cheapest college in the UK, a lot of online training mills try and milk a lot more out of people for it.
It might be worth me asking them if I can enrol to see what it's like!

Reminds me a bit of the Rajabhat system, where they have students in grey overalls/pajamas doing HNC/HND/FD type courses out of hours.

Is this one something like that? http://rpitssr.edu.kh/
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

Post by Phnom Poon »

you sound as though you're expecting to breeze in as some kind of rare golden opportunity for talented locals
and therefore pay then substandard rates
but i think there's already a well established IT community here

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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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Well I'm not intending to sound like that. I'm intending to sound like I don't know anything, and like I'm trying to find out what's what. It seems to have worked, because there have been a lot of helpful responses, and a useful lead to follow. Having said that, I do know that the languages and stuff I'm doing, and the chances to be trained in it are not common in the West. If everyone wants to be a web developer, then good luck to them, but what I'm talking about is more full on coding of standalone software and embedded systems.
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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girls dont study that stuff in KOW
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

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:fighting:
frank lee bent wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:12 am girls dont study that stuff in KOW
That's true, those who study IT are almost entirely male.
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

Post by taabarang »

John Bingham wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 12:34 am Most graduates in the fields you are talking abouts are already working before they even finish their studies. They are in high demand and I can't see them going for a scheme like this that doesn't have similar benefits.
It seems to me that you are looking for both ideas and inspiration. Google a similar program in the German educational system called "Practicum." They don't have the struggle of academic excellence that you will face. I can't help but feeling that you will have more success if you can find an educational institution willing to better prepare some students for your needs
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Re: Hiring young Cambodian graduates and training them - a feasibility study

Post by CaptainNemo »

John Bingham wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:25 am :fighting:
frank lee bent wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:12 am girls dont study that stuff in KOW
That's true, those who study IT are almost entirely male.
I'm sure that's true. The photos from RPITSSR show only a few girls, and one doing what looks like electrical technician work (12/45 in their student photo, so about 25%); the PNC place seems to want to present a more 50-50 representation, but that could be a western marketing agenda.
It's normal in the west too. On my electronics degree there was about 90 students, and about 4 of 5 girls at the start, and only 2 at the end, and that's with all the western pro-female facilitation and marketing; women have always tended to choose more "nurturing" and "humanities" subjects. However, I'm hoping there is more of a trend towards women in computer science. I guess one way of doing it is that I just try out PNC students on mobile app development using a game engine written by us. A bit like making the lego bricks and putting a set together for them to play with... not unlike mindstorms, but pointing a bit more towards the real-world, perhaps.

I think it's worth noting that IT is not the same thing as CS.
IT is a simpler non-mathematical subject for technicians rather than engineers.
Web Development is lightweight programming, sort of inbetween IT and CS, with a restricted range of simpler languages.
CS is programming theory and practice, it's mathematical, knowledge intensive and creative, and more demanding.
Computer/Software Engineering to my mind is CS that leans into Electronics, so embedded systems and firmware.
Engineers tend not to regard CS as engineering, unless it covers at least systems engineering or electronics.
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