Voltage stabiliser

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AE86
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by AE86 » Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:59 pm

I'm not an expert with electronics, but what I have been told is that the UPS itself is a good surge protector because of the battery acting as the buffer to absorb spikes in current. However when it comes to drop time, I don't know if the battery compensates or not for voltage drops. I want to say "no", but again, not an expert.

Personally though, I am planning on getting a stabliser anyway because the equipment I'm going to be plugging in is far too expensive to risk getting burnt.
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by juansweetpotato » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:35 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:37 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:30 pm
Spoiler:
AE86 wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:28 pm
Unless I'm wrong, I suppose you could get one of those plug in boxes (1kw probably sufficient) that you wire to the mains and can plug the icebox directly into that. I can't remember the prices though, but I want to say PP Electrical supply has the 1Kw Chinese units for $40 or so. It's what I had to do for our old food place where voltage was constantly dropping to the 150-160 range. That is of course, if the voltage is the main problem.

Image
Is that just another form of UPS?

Edit: I wonder if one of these would be better than a UPS?

Edit 2: Answering my own question, no - it's not another form of UPS, no significant battery.
Following up, AE86, given the dirty power in PP, do you think a voltage stabilizer in behind a UPS would protect the UPS significantly enough to be worth it?
I missed this thread, sorry Vlad. Not sure Stroppy but I know they give horrible harmonic hum on audio devices like hifi etc. Once again, unless Vlad uses it full load all the time, which is highly unlikely, it could double his electric bill.
Did you obtain your voltage readings in PP? I always thought it maybe better here. They stole my ring meter at Grand View when I first got back up here, so I've not collected any readings. My post is just out side my house, so no probs for me. No varrying on lights or AC. It's​ the voltage drop on insufficiently sized cable on long runs that causes it along with overloaded posts. It's nearly always way better if you measure directly at the post.

AE make sure you get a surge protector that doesn't dump to earth. There are two main types available. I had a good link but seemed to gave lost it.
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StroppyChops
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by StroppyChops » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:55 pm

juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:35 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:37 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:30 pm
Spoiler:
AE86 wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:28 pm
Unless I'm wrong, I suppose you could get one of those plug in boxes (1kw probably sufficient) that you wire to the mains and can plug the icebox directly into that. I can't remember the prices though, but I want to say PP Electrical supply has the 1Kw Chinese units for $40 or so. It's what I had to do for our old food place where voltage was constantly dropping to the 150-160 range. That is of course, if the voltage is the main problem.

Image
Is that just another form of UPS?

Edit: I wonder if one of these would be better than a UPS?

Edit 2: Answering my own question, no - it's not another form of UPS, no significant battery.
Following up, AE86, given the dirty power in PP, do you think a voltage stabilizer in behind a UPS would protect the UPS significantly enough to be worth it?
I missed this thread, sorry Vlad. Not sure Stroppy but I know they give horrible harmonic hum on audio devices like hifi etc. Once again, unless Vlad uses it full load all the time, which is highly unlikely, it could double his electric bill.
Did you obtain your voltage readings in PP? I always thought it maybe better here. They stole my ring meter at Grand View when I first got back up here, so I've not collected any readings. My post is just out side my house, so no probs for me. No varrying on lights or AC. It's​ the voltage drop on insufficiently sized cable on long runs that causes it along with overloaded posts. It's nearly always way better if you measure directly at the post.

AE make sure you get a surge protector that doesn't dump to earth. There are two main types available. I had a good link but seemed to gave lost it.
Your post has just given me pause for thought.

First, responding to your comments - I didn't read the 180v level myself, a qualified electrician told me the entire area that Vlad, UT and I live in is regulated to 180v. I'm directly across from the supply pole so there's no issue with run length for me, not sure about Vlad. There are definite periods in the day when that 180v is challenged. I can have a lukewarm shower during those periods, or a reasonably hot one at midnight, for example. Browning-out lights and a/c's is just so normal it doesn't even register any more. Although as posted elsewhere, the lines are being ripped down and being replaced with HD supply runs on new poles with new capacitors in the block behind us, so maybe we'll see an improvement. There are probably enough "important people" moving into the villas in this area now to warrant decent supply.

Second, the pause for thought. I recently bought a small practice amp that hums quietly with no inputs, as soon as I plug in a lead it howls. I figured it was munted and contacted the seller to organise a replacement, which I'm yet to go and collect. I'm now wondering if I'm going to have a harmonic issue with any sound gear. My keyboard doesn't hum, but I haven't tried it with an amp yet. A cheap pair of crap speakers hum and pulse when plugged into my PC - although I've just swapped in the new UPS and that seems to have abated.
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by juansweetpotato » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:56 pm

Duncan wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 12:56 pm
I bought a Sharp ,, fridge /freeze about one month ago,, which has a sticker on the door saying, ,, Wide Range Voltage. 113v---260 v.

Not too sure of the exact numbers as I'm not at home where that fridge is.,,, I would assume that means it would not need a Voltage Stabilizer.




But thats not the reason I bought a Sharp fridge, It's the only one I could find that has a key lock on it to stop the kids pinching my favorite ice-cream.
Spot on Duncan.
Have a look at the back of your fridge Vlad and see what the label says. The Cambodians know what works and what doesn't here so I'd be surprised if it is voltage related.
More than likely the landlord has put the smallest and cheapest connection available into his property and your running out of amps.

It's not as bad as it may seem though, because a job I did in SNVL had the exact same problem. Solution? Pay an EDC guy on the side to upgrade the trip in the outside post box from 10 to 20 amps. They cost under a tenner for a genuine Hager.
Of course it could just be your fridge is el fuckod.Find your trip in the box outside and see what the big number says. It should be either 10 or 20.
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by juansweetpotato » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:11 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:55 pm
juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:35 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:37 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:30 pm
Spoiler:
AE86 wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:28 pm
Unless I'm wrong, I suppose you could get one of those plug in boxes (1kw probably sufficient) that you wire to the mains and can plug the icebox directly into that. I can't remember the prices though, but I want to say PP Electrical supply has the 1Kw Chinese units for $40 or so. It's what I had to do for our old food place where voltage was constantly dropping to the 150-160 range. That is of course, if the voltage is the main problem.

Image
Is that just another form of UPS?

Edit: I wonder if one of these would be better than a UPS?

Edit 2: Answering my own question, no - it's not another form of UPS, no significant battery.
Following up, AE86, given the dirty power in PP, do you think a voltage stabilizer in behind a UPS would protect the UPS significantly enough to be worth it?
I missed this thread, sorry Vlad. Not sure Stroppy but I know they give horrible harmonic hum on audio devices like hifi etc. Once again, unless Vlad uses it full load all the time, which is highly unlikely, it could double his electric bill.
Did you obtain your voltage readings in PP? I always thought it maybe better here. They stole my ring meter at Grand View when I first got back up here, so I've not collected any readings. My post is just out side my house, so no probs for me. No varrying on lights or AC. It's​ the voltage drop on insufficiently sized cable on long runs that causes it along with overloaded posts. It's nearly always way better if you measure directly at the post.

AE make sure you get a surge protector that doesn't dump to earth. There are two main types available. I had a good link but seemed to gave lost it.
Your post has just given me pause for thought.

First, responding to your comments - I didn't read the 180v level myself, a qualified electrician told me the entire area that Vlad, UT and I live in is regulated to 180v. I'm directly across from the supply pole so there's no issue with run length for me, not sure about Vlad. There are definite periods in the day when that 180v is challenged. I can have a lukewarm shower during those periods, or a reasonably hot one at midnight, for example. Browning-out lights and a/c's is just so normal it doesn't even register any more. Although as posted elsewhere, the lines are being ripped down and being replaced with HD supply runs on new poles with new capacitors in the block behind us, so maybe we'll see an improvement. There are probably enough "important people" moving into the villas in this area now to warrant decent supply.

Second, the pause for thought. I recently bought a small practice amp that hums quietly with no inputs, as soon as I plug in a lead it howls. I figured it was munted and contacted the seller to organise a replacement, which I'm yet to go and collect. I'm now wondering if I'm going to have a harmonic issue with any sound gear. My keyboard doesn't hum, but I haven't tried it with an amp yet. A cheap pair of crap speakers hum and pulse when plugged into my PC - although I've just swapped in the new UPS and that seems to have abated.
Interesting that he told you that. I'm not sure if it's correct or not here in PP. In SNVL I was measuring higher rates than that, but they would brown out at around 180v. In fact, I've read most of the government studies on and implementation of, the electrical systems out here. They follow the Thai way, and they gurantee 220/ 50. Which makes me laugh.

Afa the amp goes.
Normally we just cut the earth on stage amps to cut the earth loops. :pirat:
But I doubt if many people have an earth to cut in Cambodia. Are you running it through a voltage regulator as in your pic, or a UPS? It could well clean it up if you are.
Otherwise, I would have to refresh my brain on a solution as I haven't been involved with that stuff for years.
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StroppyChops
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by StroppyChops » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:28 pm

juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:11 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:55 pm
juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:35 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:37 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:30 pm
Spoiler:


Is that just another form of UPS?

Edit: I wonder if one of these would be better than a UPS?

Edit 2: Answering my own question, no - it's not another form of UPS, no significant battery.
Following up, AE86, given the dirty power in PP, do you think a voltage stabilizer in behind a UPS would protect the UPS significantly enough to be worth it?
I missed this thread, sorry Vlad. Not sure Stroppy but I know they give horrible harmonic hum on audio devices like hifi etc. Once again, unless Vlad uses it full load all the time, which is highly unlikely, it could double his electric bill.
Did you obtain your voltage readings in PP? I always thought it maybe better here. They stole my ring meter at Grand View when I first got back up here, so I've not collected any readings. My post is just out side my house, so no probs for me. No varrying on lights or AC. It's​ the voltage drop on insufficiently sized cable on long runs that causes it along with overloaded posts. It's nearly always way better if you measure directly at the post.

AE make sure you get a surge protector that doesn't dump to earth. There are two main types available. I had a good link but seemed to gave lost it.
Your post has just given me pause for thought.

First, responding to your comments - I didn't read the 180v level myself, a qualified electrician told me the entire area that Vlad, UT and I live in is regulated to 180v. I'm directly across from the supply pole so there's no issue with run length for me, not sure about Vlad. There are definite periods in the day when that 180v is challenged. I can have a lukewarm shower during those periods, or a reasonably hot one at midnight, for example. Browning-out lights and a/c's is just so normal it doesn't even register any more. Although as posted elsewhere, the lines are being ripped down and being replaced with HD supply runs on new poles with new capacitors in the block behind us, so maybe we'll see an improvement. There are probably enough "important people" moving into the villas in this area now to warrant decent supply.

Second, the pause for thought. I recently bought a small practice amp that hums quietly with no inputs, as soon as I plug in a lead it howls. I figured it was munted and contacted the seller to organise a replacement, which I'm yet to go and collect. I'm now wondering if I'm going to have a harmonic issue with any sound gear. My keyboard doesn't hum, but I haven't tried it with an amp yet. A cheap pair of crap speakers hum and pulse when plugged into my PC - although I've just swapped in the new UPS and that seems to have abated.
Interesting that he told you that. I'm not sure if it's correct or not here in PP. In SNVL I was measuring higher rates than that, but they would brown out at around 180v. In fact, I've read most of the government studies on and implementation of, the electrical systems out here. They follow the Thai way, and they gurantee 220/ 50. Which makes me laugh.

Afa the amp goes.
Normally we just cut the earth on stage amps to cut the earth loops. :pirat:
But I doubt if many people have an earth to cut in Cambodia. Are you running it through a voltage regulator as in your pic, or a UPS? It could well clean it up if you are.
Otherwise, I would have to refresh my brain on a solution as I haven't been involved with that stuff for years.
I've done the really stupid thing and chucked a cheap multimeter straight into a wall socket. 180v. Read up on why that's such a bad idea and won't do it again. Thank God it didn't get all sparky on me.

This particular amp cord has the ground pin cut away, so earthage is not the problem. Perhaps it's just a dodgy unit - it's second hand, from a shipment of second hand amps.
Bodge: This ain't Kansas, and the neighbours ate Toto!
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by juansweetpotato » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:40 pm

StroppyChops wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:28 pm
juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:11 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:55 pm
juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:35 pm
StroppyChops wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:37 pm


Following up, AE86, given the dirty power in PP, do you think a voltage stabilizer in behind a UPS would protect the UPS significantly enough to be worth it?
I missed this thread, sorry Vlad. Not sure Stroppy but I know they give horrible harmonic hum on audio devices like hifi etc. Once again, unless Vlad uses it full load all the time, which is highly unlikely, it could double his electric bill.
Did you obtain your voltage readings in PP? I always thought it maybe better here. They stole my ring meter at Grand View when I first got back up here, so I've not collected any readings. My post is just out side my house, so no probs for me. No varrying on lights or AC. It's​ the voltage drop on insufficiently sized cable on long runs that causes it along with overloaded posts. It's nearly always way better if you measure directly at the post.

AE make sure you get a surge protector that doesn't dump to earth. There are two main types available. I had a good link but seemed to gave lost it.
Your post has just given me pause for thought.

First, responding to your comments - I didn't read the 180v level myself, a qualified electrician told me the entire area that Vlad, UT and I live in is regulated to 180v. I'm directly across from the supply pole so there's no issue with run length for me, not sure about Vlad. There are definite periods in the day when that 180v is challenged. I can have a lukewarm shower during those periods, or a reasonably hot one at midnight, for example. Browning-out lights and a/c's is just so normal it doesn't even register any more. Although as posted elsewhere, the lines are being ripped down and being replaced with HD supply runs on new poles with new capacitors in the block behind us, so maybe we'll see an improvement. There are probably enough "important people" moving into the villas in this area now to warrant decent supply.

Second, the pause for thought. I recently bought a small practice amp that hums quietly with no inputs, as soon as I plug in a lead it howls. I figured it was munted and contacted the seller to organise a replacement, which I'm yet to go and collect. I'm now wondering if I'm going to have a harmonic issue with any sound gear. My keyboard doesn't hum, but I haven't tried it with an amp yet. A cheap pair of crap speakers hum and pulse when plugged into my PC - although I've just swapped in the new UPS and that seems to have abated.
Interesting that he told you that. I'm not sure if it's correct or not here in PP. In SNVL I was measuring higher rates than that, but they would brown out at around 180v. In fact, I've read most of the government studies on and implementation of, the electrical systems out here. They follow the Thai way, and they gurantee 220/ 50. Which makes me laugh.

Afa the amp goes.
Normally we just cut the earth on stage amps to cut the earth loops. :pirat:
But I doubt if many people have an earth to cut in Cambodia. Are you running it through a voltage regulator as in your pic, or a UPS? It could well clean it up if you are.
Otherwise, I would have to refresh my brain on a solution as I haven't been involved with that stuff for years.
I've done the really stupid thing and chucked a cheap multimeter straight into a wall socket. 180v. Read up on why that's such a bad idea and won't do it again. Thank God it didn't get all sparky on me.

This particular amp cord has the ground pin cut away, so earthage is not the problem. Perhaps it's just a dodgy unit - it's second hand, from a shipment of second hand amps.
180v and your supply box us close to the house? Interesting. What time of day did you take the reading? Was it in very hot weather when everyone starts booting their ACs up?

It could well be the amp, I've owned loads of guitar Amps in the 70's and 80's.and most of them hummed like a bastard. Fender, Marshall, Redmere, Orange, H and H, Selmer etc etc.
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by StroppyChops » Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:06 pm

juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:40 pm
180v and your supply box us close to the house? Interesting. What time of day did you take the reading? Was it in very hot weather when everyone starts booting their ACs up?

It could well be the amp, I've owned loads of guitar Amps in the 70's and 80's.and most of them hummed like a bastard. Fender, Marshall, Redmere, Orange, H and H, Selmer etc etc.
The landlord had EDC upgrade the provisioning to the maximum available (three lines to the box?) for a fee. I don't remember the conditions when I tested, possibly mid-afternoon on a mild day.

Yeah, this is a little practice Fender that's been bashed about a bit, I suspect it's dodgy.
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by vladimir » Sun Jun 25, 2017 6:07 am

juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:56 pm
It's not as bad as it may seem though, because a job I did in SNVL had the exact same problem. Solution? Pay an EDC guy on the side to upgrade the trip in the outside post box from 10 to 20 amps. They cost under a tenner for a genuine Hager.
Of course it could just be your fridge is el fuckod.Find your trip in the box outside and see what the big number says. It should be either 10 or 20.
Yeah, we did the trip upgrade the day we moved in.

We'll get someone from a decent Fridge repair company to have a look, but the guy has told me already that it would be the supply, because we switch on the hwc and the aircon drops.
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Re: Voltage stabiliser

Post by juansweetpotato » Sun Jun 25, 2017 6:21 am

vladimir wrote:
Sun Jun 25, 2017 6:07 am
juansweetpotato wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:56 pm
It's not as bad as it may seem though, because a job I did in SNVL had the exact same problem. Solution? Pay an EDC guy on the side to upgrade the trip in the outside post box from 10 to 20 amps. They cost under a tenner for a genuine Hager.
Of course it could just be your fridge is el fuckod.Find your trip in the box outside and see what the big number says. It should be either 10 or 20.
Yeah, we did the trip upgrade the day we moved in.

We'll get someone from a decent Fridge repair company to have a look, but the guy has told me already that it would be the supply, because we switch on the hwc and the aircon drops.
Blimey, hot water ay. Yes, that'll suck some power.
I looked deep into the fridge problem, still couldn't work out the reason why it was failing. Let us know if you get it fixed and what the problem was. Cheers.
Last edited by juansweetpotato on Sun Jun 25, 2017 11:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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