MSG?

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vladimir
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Re: MSG?

Post by vladimir » Sun Jun 29, 2014 6:57 am

OrangeDragon wrote:Digg3r, you do seem to have some internet crush on Stroppy. It's almost as bad as the one Bonez had on me on the other side.
LOL, I had WAY more admirers than you, OD!

The only real survivor now is nancyinasia, (and maybe NobW, but lawyers are inconsequential) :lol:
Jesus loves you...Mexico is great, right? ;)
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The Add Jay
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Re: MSG?

Post by The Add Jay » Wed Jul 02, 2014 11:34 pm

It took me a full month to get me to 70% when I first arrived. I never in my life had issues before. I can eat w.e I want at anytime and start or finish my day like a humming bird.

Its the bacteria in your stomach changing.

As for msg. My hair was falling out at an alarming rate. I realized it was my fried rice I was eating near my home. The cook was dumping 3 fat table spoons into a 6000 Riel meal. Also my body ached much more.

I stopped eating Khmer food for lunch and my body has re adjusted.
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wackyjacky
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Re: MSG?

Post by wackyjacky » Thu Jul 03, 2014 2:09 am

MSG & alcohol makes me really sleepy. 1 beer & Chinese food & it's like I ate a Xanax. My gf gets migraines and I got her to give up coffee & Red Bull & they decreased. Reading up on it I found out that MSG is maybe the biggest trigger. I shit my brains out the 1st 6 months here. Since then, I've had less problems than back in the States actually.
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Re: MSG?

Post by JBTrain » Thu Jul 03, 2014 6:14 am

wackyjacky wrote:. Reading up on it I found out that MSG is maybe the biggest trigger.
Where did you read this ? Far as I know no study has ever linked MSG with the symptoms often attributed to it.
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Soi Dog
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Re: MSG?

Post by Soi Dog » Thu Jul 03, 2014 6:27 am

vladimir wrote:
OrangeDragon wrote:Digg3r, you do seem to have some internet crush on Stroppy. It's almost as bad as the one Bonez had on me on the other side.
LOL, I had WAY more admirers than you, OD!

The only real survivor now is nancyinasia, (and maybe NobW, but lawyers are inconsequential) :lol:
Maybe that's because everyone else was banned.
Sailorman
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Re: MSG?

Post by Sailorman » Thu Jul 03, 2014 7:30 am

I can tell when I had a meal with MSG. The next day I can't drink enough water.
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JBTrain
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Re: MSG?

Post by JBTrain » Thu Jul 03, 2014 7:56 am

Sailorman wrote:I can tell when I had a meal with MSG. The next day I can't drink enough water.
So you don't eat local food ? Even if they don't add MSG Knorr Chicken Powder is as ubiquitous as rice. Every soup, noodle, or stir fry contains either or both.
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giblet
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Re: MSG?

Post by giblet » Thu Jul 03, 2014 10:36 am

I think if all of these symptoms from eating MSG existed, there would be at least a few studies to prove it, no?
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Kuroneko
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Re: MSG?

Post by Kuroneko » Thu Jul 03, 2014 11:40 am

giblet wrote:I think if all of these symptoms from eating MSG existed, there would be at least a few studies to prove it, no?
A few here. One says rigorous and realistic scientific evidence linking the syndrome to MSG could not be found. The next shows effects on alleged sensitive people to doses in excess of 2.5mg. However the first study notes the difficulty in doing double blind tests because of the strong taste of MSG. The last study links MSG to retinal cell destruction.

Monosodium L-glutamate: a double-blind study and review.
Tarasoff L1, Kelly MF.
Food Chem Toxicol. 1993 Dec;31(12):1019-35.

Abstract

71 healthy subjects were treated with placebos and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) doses of 1.5, 3.0 and 3.15 g/person, which represented a body mass-adjusted dose range of 0.015-0.07 g/kg body weight before a standardized breakfast over 5 days. The study used a rigorous randomized double-blind crossover design that controlled for subjects who had MSG after-tastes. Capsules and specially formulated drinks were used as vehicles for placebo and MSG treatments. Subjects mostly had no responses to placebo (86%) and MSG (85%) treatments. Sensations, previously attributed to MSG, did not occur at a significantly higher rate than did those elicited by placebo treatment. A significant (P < 0.05) negative correlation between MSG dose and after-effects was found. The profound effect of food in negating the effects of large MSG doses was demonstrated. The common practice of extrapolating food-free experimental results to 'in use' situations was called into question. An exhaustive review of previous methodologies identified the strong taste of MSG as the factor invalidating most 'blind' and 'double-blind' claims by previous researchers. The present study led to the conclusion that 'Chinese Restaurant Syndrome' is an anecdote applied to a variety of postprandial illnesses; rigorous and realistic scientific evidence linking the syndrome to MSG could not be found.

The monosodium glutamate symptom complex: assessment in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study.

Yang WH1, Drouin MA, Herbert M, Mao Y, Karsh J. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1997 Jun;99(6 Pt 1):757-62.

Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Considerable debate swirls about the validity of symptoms described by many people after ingestion of monosodium glutamate (MSG), and the question has remained unresolved largely because of a paucity of well-designed challenge studies.

METHODS:

We conducted oral challenge studies in self-identified MSG-sensitive subjects to determine whether they had a statistically significant difference in the incidence of their specific symptoms after ingestion of MSG compared with placebo. First, 5 gm MSG or placebo was administered in random sequence in a double-blind fashion. Subjects who reacted only to a single test agent then underwent rechallenge in random sequence in a double-blind fashion with placebo and 1.25, 2.5, and 5 gm MSG. A positive response to challenge was defined as the reproduction of > of 2 of the specific symptoms in a subject ascertained on prechallenge interview.

RESULTS:

Sixty-one subjects entered the study. On initial challenge, 18 (29.5%) responded to neither MSG nor placebo, 6 (9.8%) to both, 15 (24.6%) to placebo, and 22 (36.1%) to MSG (p = 0.324). Total and average severity of symptoms after ingestion of MSG (374 and 80) were greater than respective values after placebo ingestion (232 and 56; p = 0.026 and 0.018, respectively). Rechallenge revealed an apparent threshold dose for reactivity of 2.5 gm MSG. Headache (p < 0.023), muscle tightness (p < 0.004), numbness/tingling (p < 0.007), general weakness (p < 0.040), and flushing (p < 0.016) occurred more frequently after MSG than placebo ingestion.

CONCLUSIONS:

Oral challenge with MSG reproduced symptoms in alleged sensitive persons. The mechanism of the reaction remains unknown, but symptom characteristics do not support an IgE-mediated mechanism. According to Food and Drug Administration recommendations, the symptoms, originally called the Chinese restaurant syndrome, are better referred to as the MSG symptom complex.


A high dietary intake of sodium glutamate as flavoring (ajinomoto) causes gross changes in retinal morphology and function.

Ohguro H1, Katsushima H, Maruyama I, Maeda T, Yanagihashi S, Metoki T, Nakazawa M. Exp Eye Res. 2002 Sep;75(3):307-15

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of glutamate accumulation in vitreous on retinal structure and function, due to a diet high in sodium glutamate. Three different diet groups were created, consisting of rats fed on a regular diet (diet A), a moderate excess of sodium glutamate diet (diet B) and a large excess of sodium glutamate diet (diet C). After 1, 3 and 6 months of the administration of these diets, amino acids concentrations in vitreous were analyzed. In addition, retinal morphology and function by electroretinogram (ERG) of three different diet groups were studied. Significant accumulation of glutamate in vitreous was observed in rats following addition of sodium glutamate to the diet as compared to levels with a regular diet. In the retinal morphology, thickness of retinal neuronal layers was remarkably thinner in rats fed on sodium glutamate diets than in those on a regular diet. TdT-dUTP terminal nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining revealed significant accumulation of the positive staining cells within the retinal ganglion cell layers in retinas from diets B and C as compared with that from diet A. Similar to this, immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) within the retinal inner layers from diets B and C as compared with diet A. Functionally, ERG responses were reduced in rats fed on a sodium glutamate diets as compared with those on a regular diet. The present study suggests that a diet with excess sodium glutamate over a period of several years may increase glutamate concentrations in vitreous and may cause retinal cell destruction.
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Re: MSG?

Post by wackyjacky » Thu Jul 03, 2014 12:09 pm

JBTrain wrote:
wackyjacky wrote:. Reading up on it I found out that MSG is maybe the biggest trigger.
Where did you read this ? Far as I know no study has ever linked MSG with the symptoms often attributed to it.
.....You're right there's no definitive scientific proof. I read about 3 or 4 sites and they all mentioned MSG at or near the top of possible migraine triggers though. I read Wiki, Mayo Clinic, & WebMD as well. Just Google migraines. I had never heard of MSG being linked before either. Triggers are all over the place. I bet they listed 50-100. Makes it sound to me like it's psychosomatic. It's all very individual. It reminds me of the Silicone boobs thing. So many symptoms & problems with no actual proof. I remember the stuff 'Accent' that everyone's Mom used in the 70s, then 10 years later it was bad for you all of a sudden & 1/2 the Chinese restaurants had NO MSG signs up everywhere. Like I said before it makes me really tired, but only with a beer. I got the gf off of instant noodles, Red Bull, & caffeine & she only gets a migraine occasionally now compared to every other day.
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