Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

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bangkokhooker
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by bangkokhooker » Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:34 pm

Jerry Atrick wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:55 am
kocdim wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:52 am
superferret wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 12:21 am
I'm new to scooters and recently purchased a Yamaha Taurus 114 cc underbone, no idea what year but it was registered in 2012
The speedometer is not working, so possible the odometer is also not working.
Anyone know how often I'm supposed to change the oil on these things and is there anything else I need to do for routine maintenance?
It's a manual bike. Also it says on the registration card Type: Srey (i.e. woman) what does that mean?
I heard the oil change is 5 dollars, is that correct?

Thanks
I forgot. You need to change gear oil. They recommend I think every 5K to 20K. But you dont know when was previous changed so you should change it. It will damage you transmission and you might end up paying 200-300 dollar for parts if the transmission/gear oil is gone. It should be around 2.5USD-5USD to change it. Not sure the exact price. Some scooters use the engine oil. So check first.
Don't be confusing him. He's had good advice so far.

The semi-auto he is buying does not have separate gear oil to engine oil. That's just in two strokes, which are less common.
Now you’re confusing him!
Some 2 strokes have a separate oil supply that automatically mixes with petrol to lubricate the internal cylinder walls, pistons etc. (Some you pre mix it and stick in the tank.
The only 2T in Cambodia are those Today things.
What you’re talking about is a “dry sump” that only big bikes have, usually.

Those types of bikes, auto (Icon, Step, Zoomer) and semi auto (Dream, Wave, Smash, Taurus) scooters do not have gearbox oil, in the true sense of the word. They use the engine oil to lubricate any gears. It’s all enclosed.

Auto motos use a tiny amount of gear oil in the rear wheel assembly but that will last a long time before change because it’s a simple cog and gear. 500ml is all but you need proper hypoid gear oil.

Oil changes are 1000km and filer every 3000km. Go on KM not time.
The only bikes that need a change every 500km are those crappy “Honda” Wins, which are never made by Honda but Chinese, because they are crap and either lose oil or burn it, so you’re actually just replacing what’s lots!

Motos are not complicated. They are designed to run with no maintenance which is why a lot of them were designed for the Asian and African market.
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by kocdim » Tue Mar 06, 2018 2:59 pm

bangkokhooker wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:34 pm
Jerry Atrick wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:55 am
kocdim wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:52 am
superferret wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 12:21 am
I'm new to scooters and recently purchased a Yamaha Taurus 114 cc underbone, no idea what year but it was registered in 2012
The speedometer is not working, so possible the odometer is also not working.
Anyone know how often I'm supposed to change the oil on these things and is there anything else I need to do for routine maintenance?
It's a manual bike. Also it says on the registration card Type: Srey (i.e. woman) what does that mean?
I heard the oil change is 5 dollars, is that correct?

Thanks
I forgot. You need to change gear oil. They recommend I think every 5K to 20K. But you dont know when was previous changed so you should change it. It will damage you transmission and you might end up paying 200-300 dollar for parts if the transmission/gear oil is gone. It should be around 2.5USD-5USD to change it. Not sure the exact price. Some scooters use the engine oil. So check first.
Don't be confusing him. He's had good advice so far.

The semi-auto he is buying does not have separate gear oil to engine oil. That's just in two strokes, which are less common.
Now you’re confusing him!
Some 2 strokes have a separate oil supply that automatically mixes with petrol to lubricate the internal cylinder walls, pistons etc. (Some you pre mix it and stick in the tank.
The only 2T in Cambodia are those Today things.
What you’re talking about is a “dry sump” that only big bikes have, usually.

Those types of bikes, auto (Icon, Step, Zoomer) and semi auto (Dream, Wave, Smash, Taurus) scooters do not have gearbox oil, in the true sense of the word. They use the engine oil to lubricate any gears. It’s all enclosed.

Auto motos use a tiny amount of gear oil in the rear wheel assembly but that will last a long time before change because it’s a simple cog and gear. 500ml is all but you need proper hypoid gear oil.

Oil changes are 1000km and filer every 3000km. Go on KM not time.
The only bikes that need a change every 500km are those crappy “Honda” Wins, which are never made by Honda but Chinese, because they are crap and either lose oil or burn it, so you’re actually just replacing what’s lots!

Motos are not complicated. They are designed to run with no maintenance which is why a lot of them were designed for the Asian and African market.
As I novice he should know that THERE IS GEAR OIL. And that need to be changed. If his doesnt use Gear oil good. I'm not expert. I'm novice also. So how should I know if his motor uses gear oil or no. I just said go to the shop and ask if he need to change gear oil or no that all. And about this engine oil by a mile. Didn't work for me. If I dont change EVERY month I have problems. even if I did city driving. Thats from my side.
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by Heng Heng Heng » Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:02 pm

Any idea of the cost of a replacement shock absorber for a lightweight moto such as a Honda Today? Mine''s getting a bit bouncy on the potholes.
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by Bitte_Kein_Lexus » Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:06 pm

AndyKK wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 2:38 pm
Bitte_Kein_Lexus wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 6:51 am
I wouldn't touch the brake fluid unless you're sure it's leaking. Just check the pads. Oil every 2000km and you're good to go. I've got 12 000km on mine, bought it new. All I've done is oil changes, front pads once, then recently changed both tires, rear drum brake pads and chain/sprocket set. I change oil more regularly than 2000km,but do a lot of 80kmh highway rides, which stresses it out a bit. Manual says to change every 4000km or so, and manuals always err on the side of caution, so don't worry. 2000km is fine.
What is it with the brake fluid over here. I can see that temperature will take effect. My brakes have locked solid on one occasion. Also, a friend of mine had a high speed accident in Thailand on his 1000cc moto when his front brake locked up.
I've never had an issue. If they're locking up, it's probably because your lever is maladjusted or you've got air/water in the line.



bangkokhooker wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:34 pm
Now you’re confusing him!
Some 2 strokes have a separate oil supply that automatically mixes with petrol to lubricate the internal cylinder walls, pistons etc. (Some you pre mix it and stick in the tank.
The only 2T in Cambodia are those Today things.
What you’re talking about is a “dry sump” that only big bikes have, usually.

Those types of bikes, auto (Icon, Step, Zoomer) and semi auto (Dream, Wave, Smash, Taurus) scooters do not have gearbox oil, in the true sense of the word. They use the engine oil to lubricate any gears. It’s all enclosed.

Auto motos use a tiny amount of gear oil in the rear wheel assembly but that will last a long time before change because it’s a simple cog and gear. 500ml is all but you need proper hypoid gear oil.

Oil changes are 1000km and filer every 3000km. Go on KM not time.
The only bikes that need a change every 500km are those crappy “Honda” Wins, which are never made by Honda but Chinese, because they are crap and either lose oil or burn it, so you’re actually just replacing what’s lots!

Motos are not complicated. They are designed to run with no maintenance which is why a lot of them were designed for the Asian and African market.
The Honda Today's aren't two strokes. They're four strokes. Some of them sure do seem to smoke like two-strokes though...

kocdim wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 2:59 pm
As I novice he should know that THERE IS GEAR OIL. And that need to be changed. If his doesnt use Gear oil good. I'm not expert. I'm novice also. So how should I know if his motor uses gear oil or no. I just said go to the shop and ask if he need to change gear oil or no that all. And about this engine oil by a mile. Didn't work for me. If I dont change EVERY month I have problems. even if I did city driving. Thats from my side.
I think the main confusion here is that you're using the term "gear oil", but we don't say that in English. Saying gear oil impies it's only used for the gear box, like a two-stroke as Jackal mentioned. The vast majority of these scooters (barring a few Viet ones) are four strokes, so there's no separate oil compartment for the gears. Some of the auto bikes have gear oil as mentioned, but I think it's tiny. I've never owned one myself so not too sure, but I doubt it would need to be changed often at all.

Heng Heng Heng wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:02 pm
Any idea of the cost of a replacement shock absorber for a lightweight moto such as a Honda Today? Mine''s getting a bit bouncy on the potholes.
No clue, but can't they just replace the oil, or are they sealed?
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by Heng Heng Heng » Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:21 pm

Heng Heng Heng wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:02 pm
Any idea of the cost of a replacement shock absorber for a lightweight moto such as a Honda Today? Mine''s getting a bit bouncy on the potholes.
No clue, but can't they just replace the oil, or are they sealed?
[/quote]

I think it's sealed. I'm not sure why they fail. I thought maybe the spring gets weaker due to load, and the whole unit needs replacement? I'm no mechanic.
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by Kuroneko » Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:16 pm

Heng Heng Heng wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:21 pm
Heng Heng Heng wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:02 pm
Any idea of the cost of a replacement shock absorber for a lightweight moto such as a Honda Today? Mine''s getting a bit bouncy on the potholes.
No clue, but can't they just replace the oil, or are they sealed?
I think it's sealed. I'm not sure why they fail. I thought maybe the spring gets weaker due to load, and the whole unit needs replacement? I'm no mechanic.
[/quote]
They are generally sealed units usually containing hydraulic oil and nitrogen gas. Constant use causes them to wear out

From "your mechanic" What Causes Shock Absorbers Or Struts To Leak Or Otherwise Fail? Its primarily about car suspension but the principle is the same:

Even under normal conditions on a smooth road, shocks can cycle an average of 1,750 times for every mile traveled.

When a shock or strut is cycling and exchanging fluid between chambers, it is generating heat. This heat is produced because the unit is changing the movement of the suspension into thermal energy. The solution for managing this excess heat is nitrogen gas. The gas chambers in the shock or strut keep the shock oil under constant pressure, which reduces foaming. If the gas leaks out of the chambers, the unit will “fade” and not perform as intended. Note that the unit will not leak externally. Instead, the nitrogen will form tiny bubbles in the oil. Since nitrogen gas is compressible and is much thinner than the oil, the unit starts to fade and provides much less resistance and ride control.

The valve size is not constant on most shocks and struts. By using metal discs and springs, a valve can change the size of fluid passages depending on the type of rod movement. The discs and springs in the valves can suffer from metal fatigue due to the constant movement of the suspension and fluid, which can lead to wear and handling problems. This type of wear can’t be seen with the naked eye.

The seal between the piston and bore is one area of wear. The seal must prevent fluid from flowing between the two surfaces without creating excessive amounts of friction. If the seal allows too much fluid to pass, it will influence how the valves perform. Poor sealing surfaces will cause the unit to leak. If the pitting or lost chrome plating is large enough, it can damage the seal, which can lead to water and debris getting into the unit and damaging the valves and piston seal. https://www.yourmechanic.com/question/w ... rwise-fail
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by Heng Heng Heng » Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:50 am

Thanks for the info. I also found this https://www.scootershack.co.uk/threads/ ... ers.23689/
I'll get mine replaced on Womens's Day.
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by clutchcargo » Sat Jun 23, 2018 4:33 pm

Kuroneko wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:54 am
superferret wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 12:21 am
I'm new to scooters and recently purchased a Yamaha Taurus 114 cc underbone, no idea what year but it was registered in 2012
The speedometer is not working, so possible the odometer is also not working.
Anyone know how often I'm supposed to change the oil on these things and is there anything else I need to do for routine maintenance?
It's a manual bike. Also it says on the registration card Type: Srey (i.e. woman) what does that mean?
I heard the oil change is 5 dollars, is that correct?

Thanks
If you have any problem with the battery get a Yuasa from around Orussey Market for about $10. Yamaha batteries are expensive.
How do the genuine Yamaha battery prices compare with the Yuasa one?

Do all Yamaha scooters have the same type/model of battery if you get a Yuasa?

What is the average life expectancy of a new battery these days?

If you do a lot of short trips, do people find they have to occasionally do a longer trip to maintain the battery charge? Or is that a sign the battery is on the way out?
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by Kuroneko » Sat Jun 23, 2018 6:05 pm

clutchcargo wrote:
Sat Jun 23, 2018 4:33 pm
Kuroneko wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:54 am
superferret wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 12:21 am
I'm new to scooters and recently purchased a Yamaha Taurus 114 cc underbone, no idea what year but it was registered in 2012
The speedometer is not working, so possible the odometer is also not working.
Anyone know how often I'm supposed to change the oil on these things and is there anything else I need to do for routine maintenance?
It's a manual bike. Also it says on the registration card Type: Srey (i.e. woman) what does that mean?
I heard the oil change is 5 dollars, is that correct?

Thanks
If you have any problem with the battery get a Yuasa from around Orussey Market for about $10. Yamaha batteries are expensive.
How do the genuine Yamaha battery prices compare with the Yuasa one?

Do all Yamaha scooters have the same type/model of battery if you get a Yuasa?

What is the average life expectancy of a new battery these days?

If you do a lot of short trips, do people find they have to occasionally do a longer trip to maintain the battery charge? Or is that a sign the battery is on the way out?
Genuine Yamaha battery for Taurus/Jupiter bikes were $30. I bought my bike new and the battery lasted about 3 years. I replaced with a Yuasa, they seem to last at least 2. I am on my second Yuasa and have had the bike probably about 6.5 years. Note it is parked outside in the car park.

The bike starts first or second time even if I don't use it for a few days. You shouldn't need to do a longer trip to charge up the battery. If the starting gets sluggish the battery is on the way out. When that happened to me I just slung it and replaced. The Yuasa 12v is the same size and looks the same as the original.
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Re: Changing oil and maintenance of a Cambodian scooter

Post by that genius » Sat Jun 23, 2018 6:16 pm

I would think that any maintenance depends on the hours you ride and the mileage.

I ride maybe 100 km/week, so I change the oil/air filter/oil filter every month. I'm possibly over-maintaining, but better safe than sorry.

Not sure if you can do this with your bike, but an inline fuel filter does a lot of good, and grease any joints/bearings regularly

I keep a spare spark plug, but I would only replace it when the other one packed in or once a year
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