Big demand for Keo Romeat mangoes by Thai fruit processors.

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Luigi
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Re: Big demand for Keo Romeat mangoes by Thai fruit processors.

Postby Luigi » Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:44 pm

Just in case you relly wanted to know USofA regs.

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

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e-CFR data is current as of November 17, 2016

Title 7 → Subtitle B → Chapter I → Subchapter M → Part 205 → Subpart G → §205.605

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Title 7: Agriculture
PART 205—NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM
Subpart G—Administrative
§205.605 Nonagricultural (nonorganic) substances allowed as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as “organic” or “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)).”

The following nonagricultural substances may be used as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as “organic” or “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s))” only in accordance with any restrictions specified in this section.

(a) Nonsynthetics allowed:

Acids (Alginic; Citric—produced by microbial fermentation of carbohydrate substances; and Lactic).

Agar-agar.

Animal enzymes—(Rennet—animals derived; Catalase—bovine liver; Animal lipase; Pancreatin; Pepsin; and Trypsin).

Attapulgite—as a processing aid in the handling of plant and animal oils.

Bentonite.

Calcium carbonate.

Calcium chloride.

Calcium sulfate—mined.

Carrageenan.

Dairy cultures.

Diatomaceous earth—food filtering aid only.

Enzymes—must be derived from edible, nontoxic plants, nonpathogenic fungi, or nonpathogenic bacteria.

Flavors, nonsynthetic sources only and must not be produced using synthetic solvents and carrier systems or any artificial preservative.

Gellan gum (CAS # 71010-52-1)—high-acyl form only.

Glucono delta-lactone—production by the oxidation of D-glucose with bromine water is prohibited.

Kaolin.

L-Malic acid (CAS # 97-67-6).

Magnesium sulfate, nonsynthetic sources only.

Microorganisms—any food grade bacteria, fungi, and other microorganism.

Nitrogen—oil-free grades.

Oxygen—oil-free grades.

Perlite—for use only as a filter aid in food processing.

Potassium chloride.

Potassium iodide.

Sodium bicarbonate.

Sodium carbonate.

Tartaric acid—made from grape wine.

Waxes—nonsynthetic (Carnauba wax; and Wood resin).

Yeast—When used as food or a fermentation agent in products labeled as “organic,” yeast must be organic if its end use is for human consumption; nonorganic yeast may be used when organic yeast is not commercially available. Growth on petrochemical substrate and sulfite waste liquor is prohibited. For smoked yeast, nonsynthetic smoke flavoring process must be documented.

(b) Synthetics allowed:

Acidified sodium chlorite—Secondary direct antimicrobial food treatment and indirect food contact surface sanitizing. Acidified with citric acid only.

Activated charcoal (CAS #s 7440-44-0; 64365-11-3)—only from vegetative sources; for use only as a filtering aid.

Alginates.

Ammonium bicarbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

Ammonium carbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

Ascorbic acid.

Calcium citrate.

Calcium hydroxide.

Calcium phosphates (monobasic, dibasic, and tribasic).

Carbon dioxide.

Cellulose—for use in regenerative casings, as an anti-caking agent (non-chlorine bleached) and filtering aid.

Chlorine materials—disinfecting and sanitizing food contact surfaces, Except, That, residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act (Calcium hypochlorite; Chlorine dioxide; and Sodium hypochlorite).

Ethylene—allowed for postharvest ripening of tropical fruit and degreening of citrus.

Ferrous sulfate—for iron enrichment or fortification of foods when required by regulation or recommended (independent organization).

Glycerides (mono and di)—for use only in drum drying of food.

Glycerin—produced by hydrolysis of fats and oils.

Hydrogen peroxide.

Magnesium carbonate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Magnesium chloride—derived from sea water.

Magnesium stearate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Nutrient vitamins and minerals, in accordance with 21 CFR 104.20, Nutritional Quality Guidelines For Foods.

Ozone.

Peracetic acid/Peroxyacetic acid (CAS # 79-21-0)—for use in wash and/or rinse water according to FDA limitations. For use as a sanitizer on food contact surfaces.

Phosphoric acid—cleaning of food-contact surfaces and equipment only.

Potassium acid tartrate.

Potassium carbonate.

Potassium citrate.

Potassium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables except when used for peeling peaches.

Potassium phosphate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specific ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Silicon dioxide—Permitted as a defoamer. Allowed for other uses when organic rice hulls are not commercially available.

Sodium acid pyrophosphate (CAS # 7758-16-9)—for use only as a leavening agent.

Sodium citrate.

Sodium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables.

Sodium phosphates—for use only in dairy foods.

Sulfur dioxide—for use only in wine labeled “made with organic grapes,” Provided, That, total sulfite concentration does not exceed 100 ppm.

Tocopherols—derived from vegetable oil when rosemary extracts are not a suitable alternative.

Xanthan gum.

(c)-(z) [Reserved]

[68 FR 61993, Oct. 31, 2003, as amended as 68 FR 62217, Nov. 3, 2003; 71 FR 53302, Sept. 11, 2006; 72 FR 58473, Oct. 16, 2007; 73 FR 59481, Oct. 9, 2008; 75 FR 77524, Dec. 13, 2010; 77 FR 8092, Feb. 14, 2012; 77 FR 33298, June 6, 2012; 77 FR 45907, Aug. 2, 2012; 78 FR 31821, May 28, 2013; 78 FR 61161, Oct. 3, 2013; 81 FR 51709, Aug. 3, 2016]
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Re: Big demand for Keo Romeat mangoes by Thai fruit processors.

Postby Username Taken » Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:38 pm

You are, of course, correct. But the Koreans only asked for the fruit to washed in hot water. Can't be too difficult.
... give 'em a quick, short, sharp shock ...

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Re: Big demand for Keo Romeat mangoes by Thai fruit processors.

Postby Mr Curious » Tue Nov 22, 2016 4:13 am

can't be too difficult? It's Cambodia, geez. As to size of fruit, blemishes, etc. that's a non issue as it'll be diced in tiny cubes in many cases, repackaged with Thai pineapple and some sunflower or nuts and sold in the U.S. IF the leeches that control the country allowed real production, Cambodians MIGHT wash and process the stuff themselves and export in bulk.
Never happen. I'm reminded of a story a Texas rancher told me of finding bulls that went down and then were practically drained of blood by mosquitos. The mosquitos of Cambodia are doing such a fine job that eventually I suppose China might step in as the French did years ago.
btw, aresenic is organic too. Organic is a total bullshit label applied to sell to fools.
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Re: Big demand for Keo Romeat mangoes by Thai fruit processors.

Postby Anchor Moy » Tue Nov 22, 2016 12:40 pm

Sorry I mentioned the word organic since it has nothing to do with this.
My question is why can nothing be done to make Cambodian mangoes fit for Korean consumption ? Cambodia is already selling mangoes to Thailand and Vietnam for processing and export worldwide, so the pesticide levels in the fruit itself must be within acceptable international norms. Mustn't they ??

I don't know anything about mango production, but I'm curious as to the true problem here. Is it the type of pesticides used, is it too much bother to organize a chain of production to clean them up, is it because the Cambodians are just waiting for someone else to step in with the money and the knowhow ? (Korea, China ?)
And what were S. Korea and Cambodia envisaging when they signed this trade agreement ? Surely, there was some sort of plan at the time about putting quality control in place ? I can believe that the Cambodians would sign up with eyes closed, but the Koreans not so much. Years later, and where's the plan ?

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